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Fish for people who don't eat fish

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Renault78law, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    Not sure why, but I never liked the taste and/or texture of fish. I'm trying to eat healthier so I want to start eating it. Specifically, cooked fish. Anyone have a recommendation for a type of fish that is most approachable for persons that don't like fish? Or maybe the best cooking method to make fish the most palatable for someone new to fish. I was assuming that I would grill or pan sear it.

    As an aside, I should disclose that somehow, I enjoy sushi. However, I've never enjoyed making sushi at home, which is a shame because I have access to plenty of high quality sushi/sashimi at local Japanese markets.
     
  2. anon

    anon Senior member

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    Salmon was the first fish I could tolerate. You might also enjoy swordfish.
     
  3. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I like smoked salmon, crab cakes, fish sticks. I have slowly gotten to like simple broile fish, if it is very fresh
     
  4. M. Bardamu

    M. Bardamu Senior member

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    Scallops, if you're including shellfish.
     
  5. makewayhomer

    makewayhomer Senior member

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    anything "steaky", like Tuna or Swordfish, will have a texture that is easiest to acquire. grill them for just a few minutes, at the beginning don't leave them rare in the middle. and never do that with swordfish anyways.

    after that you can graduate to cooking tuna that is left more rare, then to other fishes, etc
     
  6. Valor

    Valor Senior member

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    Probs start with grilled salmon or maybe tuna mixed with mayo. Those are pretty "non fish" textured foods.
     
  7. 1up

    1up Senior member

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    I hate Fish..and I hate the smell..but I'm pretty big into working out and the nutritional benefits of Tuna are unrivaled. Here's what I do.

    In a bowl mix together

    -1 can of flaked tuna (drain the water)
    -Few TBSP of Miracle whip (I use non-fat)
    -Salt + Pepper
    -Franks Red Hot
    -Finely chopped green onion
    -bit of lemon juice (masks the smell)

    Then I just smear that mix over a couple pieces of bread, shred some low-fat cheese over it and toast it until it's all melted...then I toss on a tomato after..

    mm [​IMG]
     
  8. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors.

    I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.
     
  9. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors.

    I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.


    +1, batter and fry it up and it's like eating a light fried chicken breast.
     
  10. WhateverYouLike

    WhateverYouLike Senior member

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    +1, batter and fry it up and it's like eating a light fried chicken breast.

    Defeats his "I'm trying to eat healthier" part, unfortunately.

    OP, why dont you just eat chicken? You're never going to stick to a diet where you eat food that you hate.
     
  11. Cavalier

    Cavalier Senior member

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    I love fish, but salmon is one that is still taking me time to enjoy -- I can get a smaller portion (4-6ozs) but could not eat much more in one sitting -- powerful flavor and takes time to get used to.

    I'd recommend Chilean sea bass
     
  12. robertorex

    robertorex Senior member

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    it's hard not to love smoked salmon.
     
  13. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    it's hard not to love smoked salmon.

    While I do enjoy smoked salmon, I disagree. I think it's pretty easy to dislike - the favor is very strong and it is quite oily. I can see people not enjoying it. In fact, I used to rather dislike it.
     
  14. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

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    I love fish, but salmon is one that is still taking me time to enjoy -- I can get a smaller portion (4-6ozs) but could not eat much more in one sitting -- powerful flavor and takes time to get used to.

    I'd recommend Chilean sea bass


    There are a number of different varieties of salmon, some oilier and stronger; others are very mild. I have two kids and they prefer Spring salmon (which is also called Chinook or King) over the very rich and oily sockeye. Spring is very mild and a pale colour. In the Fall, it's nearly white fleshed.

    Other mild fish to consider are arctic char and rainbow trout.
     
  15. Monaco

    Monaco Senior member

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    Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors.

    I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.


    Exactly, salmon has such a distinct fish stench and has strong taste.

    If you are just starting out with fish and want something light, what he said above, maybe some tilapila would be good for you.
     
  16. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    Tilapia is the light beer of the fish world. It really doesn't taste like anything. Try that out first.
     
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    To the OP: I think you just need to try a lot of fish. We all have different tastes. For instance, I hate tilapia. I find it to be unappetizing, probably due to the farming conditions (put a pound of crap in the water, get a pound of fish out). Salmon I do find to be extra "fishy" on a regular basis. Tuna is very meat like.

    I would agree with what is being called Chilean sea bass. Very rich and firm fish. Try mahi and ono, very mild and firm. Try orange roughie. Find your way to cook them. For instance, poached ono with wasabi aoili is incredible. For roughie, you can lightly coat in panko then back with a little spritz of olive oil.

    I think you just need to taste and try.
     
  18. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    Red snapper is a good middle fish, I think. It has [good] fishy characteristics, but not overwhelming to someone new to fish.

    As said before, swordfish and tuna steaks are more meat-like. Chilean sea bass, which can be a bit difficult to find now given all the hoopla going on surrounding their near-extinction status, is a great fish to eat (one of my favorites) because the meat is sweet and succulent.

    Like Pio, I'm not a fan of tilapia. They're pretty flavorless.

    Wild caught salmon is phreaking delicious.
     
  19. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    Yes, the Patagonian Toothfish suggestion is a good one. Talk about a name change and blank canvas turning a little-known nothing into a worldwide hit (and threatened species).
     
  20. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Poach your fish in some milk if you want to remove the "fishy" taste. Grilling or searing is clearly not the way to go if you don't like the taste/smell of fish - it will bring it out.
     

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