first vitals, now cargo ...

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by hermes, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    There are two Arena magazines for men. One of them is called Arena, which is like a British version of Maxim.

    The other is Arena Homme Plus, which is what you would want, full of clothes, fashion, and related subjects.
     


  2. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    Vitals started off promising, but I lost interest after the second issue. My reaction to Men's Vogue has been much the same. I never was into Cargo. The only magazine in this genre whose demise I would mourn at all would be Menswear.
     


  3. Jovan

    Jovan Banned for Good

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    I lost interest in GQ after a few issues, since all their articles on clothes were just the same brands repeated.
     


  4. Flame

    Flame Senior member

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    When I first saw Arena Homme a couple of years ago, the magazine was 99% clothing. A year or two ago they changed the format around and added more articles, photo spreads of chicks (not that I minded that), and all kinds of other stuff. I haven't gotten it since. (not that I wouldn't, I just haven't gotten it since) It reminds me of Details and Interview. They have both changed quite a bit since their inception.
    Arena Homme has a more Amjack-lifestyle feel these days. The plus version is much better. I haven't seen a magazine that goes into so much detail about clothing. More couture and high-fashion as opposed to what is normally discussed here, but much better than its compeititors. Oh yea they only come out twice a year. I have to address Details here. They seem like a Hollywood interview magazine showing the interviewed in different outfits. Well I can't stomach it due to the endorsement of certain cheesy labels. Is there a way to get GQ UK state-side? I think it's big step-up over its American counterpart.
     


  5. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If you filtered this content and had regular expectations of people WRT articles vs. relying on volunteerism and the issues of the day, contributors would start asking for $$. I have yet to hear of a magazine that sustains itself largely on the subscriber base - to do so would require a very high cost (think Visionaire), further shrinking the likely market.

    Doesn't "Cook's Illustrated" do this? I seem to recall that they don't accept advertising.
     


  6. Duveen

    Duveen Senior member

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    Doesn't "Cook's Illustrated" do this? I seem to recall that they don't accept advertising.

    They may. But they also have a catalogue that sells 'approved' cooking appliances, etc - so that is one way to cash in on the branding. Not sure that this model would work for high-end menswear.

    My GF reads Cook's Illustrated - I'll ask her...
     


  7. Tck13

    Tck13 Senior member

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    Arena Homme has a more Amjack-lifestyle feel these days. The plus version is much better. I haven't seen a magazine that goes into so much detail about clothing. More couture and high-fashion as opposed to what is normally discussed here, but much better than its compeititors.
    I didn't realize Arena Homme and Arena Homme + were two different issues! I guess that is why they seemed so different!
    Barnes and Noble seems to have the best selection of men's fashion mags. They always have GQ UK there. Has anyone ever purchased men's vogue? I see the subscription is only $34. I didn't know they had that in the states. Is that new?
     


  8. Get Smart

    Get Smart Don't Crink

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    Has anyone ever purchased men's vogue? I see the subscription is only $34. I didn't know they had that in the states. Is that new?


    $34 for a year's subscription to US Men's Vogue is awfully high. I think mine was $12/yr...and yes it is fairly new, issue #2 is the most recent.
     


  9. Tck13

    Tck13 Senior member

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    $34 for a year's subscription to US Men's Vogue is awfully high. I think mine was $12/yr...and yes it is fairly new, issue #2 is the most recent.

    Oops, I was thinking of Menswear. Your right, it was $15. Is it any good?
     


  10. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Oops, I was thinking of Menswear. Your right, it was $15. Is it any good?

    If you mean MV, the first issue was spectacular. The second got mixed reviews around these parts, but I still liked it well enough. I've subscribed.

    You can get a free subscription to Menswear by going here: http://www.subnow.com/menswear

    Click on "new subscription" on the left. (I found this through Ask Andy, btw. Credit where credit is due.)
     


  11. Get Smart

    Get Smart Don't Crink

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    Oops, I was thinking of Menswear. Your right, it was $15. Is it any good?


    I have some issues of Menswear and I think it's great. Not too thick but it solely focuses on clothes on every page. Men's Vogue doesnt really impress me, at least the 2nd issue. The first was pretty good but the latest is poor. Ima reserve final judgement until they get thru a year's worth of issues but for the subscription price I think it's worth the trial.
     


  12. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    That is the function of these sites - yours included. What business model could you think of that would support the development of this content?

    These sites are about the closest to an operational model you can get: unfiltered content, a few high-value posters who volunteer and the ability to get interactive feedback.

    If you filtered this content and had regular expectations of people WRT articles vs. relying on volunteerism and the issues of the day, contributors would start asking for $$. I have yet to hear of a magazine that sustains itself largely on the subscriber base - to do so would require a very high cost (think Visionaire), further shrinking the likely market.


    You raise some excellent points. However, I didn't explain myself properly. I dont have an issue with magazines supported by advertisers vs. subscribers.

    It is common knowldge many of the actual articles in men's fashion magazines are paid advertisements in themselves. Again, I have no problem with advertisers per se for a magazine. But when a magazine only does an article on a certain make of shirt because it was paid by the shirtmaker to do so, I think that's dishonest, especially if the article is telling you their shirts are wonderful for that reason. However, Paul Stuart's catalog, which is trying to get you to buy a look they put hard work into creating and believe makes a man look great within the definitions of their look, I think that is fine.
     


  13. hermes

    hermes Senior member

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    i find all of the bi-annual fashion mags are generally better as they seem to solely concentrate on just clothes and clothing topics all in huge thick issues

    "arena" has "arena homme +"
    "loaded" has "loaded fashion" (now just called "fashion")
    "uk fhm" has "fhm fashion"
    "another magazine" has "another man"
    both "uk gq" and "german gq" have "gq style"
    "10" has "10+"
    "v" does "v man"

    "paris vogue homme international" is decent for a bi-annual issue
    "upstreet" is also decent, there is both a french and english version but i have not seen the english version since spring 2005 and think it may have folded

    there are others out there as well
     


  14. Duveen

    Duveen Senior member

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    It is common knowldge many of the actual articles in men's fashion magazines are paid advertisements in themselves. Again, I have no problem with advertisers per se for a magazine. But when a magazine only does an article on a certain make of shirt because it was paid by the shirtmaker to do so, I think that's dishonest, especially if the article is telling you their shirts are wonderful for that reason.
    Sorry - I elided the fact that pay-for-column inches was the rule for advertisement-supported magazines, esp in the clothing/high-end trade. Sad to say, that is what I mean when I say 'advertising supported'. Obviously some magazines have a bit more separation b/w editorial and content, but the line is blurry at more places than we'd like to admit. The question I'd have is - has it become so expensive to run a magazine/owners demand such high margins that the only way to get enough $$$ out of advertisers is to do the 'payola' scam on content? What is the story? Maybe you are right and clothing mags ought to be more like the Atlantic - maybe there would be a market. But one wonders...
     


  15. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    Sorry - I elided the fact that pay-for-column inches was the rule for advertisement-supported magazines, esp in the clothing/high-end trade. Sad to say, that is what I mean when I say 'advertising supported'.

    Obviously some magazines have a bit more separation b/w editorial and content, but the line is blurry at more places than we'd like to admit.

    The question I'd have is - has it become so expensive to run a magazine/owners demand such high margins that the only way to get enough $$$ out of advertisers is to do the 'payola' scam on content? What is the story?

    Maybe you are right and clothing mags ought to be more like the Atlantic - maybe there would be a market. But one wonders...


    It seems we are in complete agreement.

    Part of the larger problem is the "fashion" industry and the clothes industry which just wants you to buy what they have or make irrespective of good taste or whether it is appropriate or flattering on a person.

    I imagine there is a fair amount of captivity with writers for these magazines (who may not know much about clothes, or style) depending on the manufacturer to tell them what is hot and what is not.

    Someone who sells shirt collar pins told me, after asking how one wears them and my answering as to the proper way, that basically men who know how to dress well generally want to keep it a secret, and that it is rare that they can communicate well on paper even if they want to share their skills.

    I think it is a lot better to have talented amateurs write about what they like to see being made and what they are impressed with worn by others. Hopefully amateurs with taste will contribute enough to raise the bar of quality articles across the board. in the meantime, keep buying the magazines for the eye candy and dont believe all the hype in the articles themselves.
     


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