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First Chinese chef/restaurant awarded Michelin 3 stars

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by von Rothbart, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Distinguished Member

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  2. whoopee

    whoopee Distinguished Member

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    Never in the many times I've been there have I thought it to be a three star restaurant.
     


  3. Dragon

    Dragon Distinguished Member

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    Never in the many times I've been there have I thought it to be a three star restaurant.

    +1
     


  4. July

    July Well-Known Member

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    Never been. I might line it up on the docket for my HK trip in February. If not 3-star worthy, is it still worth going (sans expense account)?
     


  5. apropos

    apropos Distinguished Member

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    Any article that mentions 'chinese food' and 'clarity' or 'subtlety' or 'small portions' or 'foie gras' in the same breath sends my BS meter into overdrive. This bit in particular made me laugh:
    What the restaurant also fails to mention is that Chinese people would eat its food if it had a Ralph Lauren, LV, or Lacoste logo emblazoned on it. As the article hinted, the Chinese do not always dine for their own pleasure - a large part of it is 'impressing guests'. I will be opening a taco stand soon. And it will have foie gras in it. Watch for the first 3 Michelin star Mexican food stand.
     


  6. rsgould

    rsgould Well-Known Member

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    What the restaurant also fails to mention is that Chinese people would eat its food if it had a Ralph Lauren, LV, or Lacoste logo emblazoned on it. Watch for the first 3 Michelin star Mexican food stand.[/I]

    Gross generalization. Perhaps more true in Hong Kong than in, say, Guizhou.

    But anyway, I would agree in the broad sense that much of the high-end Cantonese cuisine that can be found in HK tends to be underwhelming at best.
     


  7. whoopee

    whoopee Distinguished Member

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    Never been. I might line it up on the docket for my HK trip in February. If not 3-star worthy, is it still worth going (sans expense account)?

    It's worth going to and not very expensive, but don't expect to be blown away as you would expect at a 3 star restaurant. The dim sum and food in general is very well-done, as they are at most of HK's 5 star hotels' restaurants. This one gets more creative than the other but isn't all that wild. Fine service and presentation, which I believe partly accounts for Lung King Heen's 3 stars. Michelin probably thought they needed to give out one "3 star" designation to avoid being lynched, and personally I can't think of any obvious choices.

    FWIW, I find the most satisfying Cantonese meals in HK are to be had in more traditional restaurants. The service and presentation are quite different.
     


  8. apropos

    apropos Distinguished Member

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    Gross generalization. Perhaps more true in Hong Kong than in, say, Guizhou.
    My bad - you are 100% correct.

    IME, Hongkongers are by far the most egregious offenders I have come across in the 'conspicuous consumption' department.
     


  9. rsgould

    rsgould Well-Known Member

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    IME, Hongkongers are by far the most egregious offenders I have come across in the 'conspicuous consumption' department.


    True. Although slowly but surely, Shanghainese are starting to give HKers a run for their money in this regard. I was at one of the upscale malls in TST a month or two ago and was trying to ask a saleswoman a few questions, but she spoke no English (and I don't speak Cantonese). But we ended up chatting in Mandarin, and she said all the salespeople in TST are learning Mandarin to accommodate the Mainlanders who come to shop at the big name designer boutiques. She even said I could pay in RMB instead of HKD.

    Sure enough, walk around certain boutiques and more and more Mainlanders are there, dropping huge sums of money (in cash, naturally), buying--shall we say--less than tasteful items.

    FWIW, I find the most satisfying Cantonese meals in HK are to be had in more traditional restaurants. The service and presentation are quite different.

    Agreed. I find Guangzhou-style Cantonese a bit more down-to-earth and homely than HK-style, even at the top restaurants in GZ. That being said, Cantonese street food (noodles, siu mei, etc) tends to be much better in HK, mostly because there are actual health standards in HK.


    Anyway....anyone have a (Chinese) restaurant choice in Greater China worthy or 3 Michelin Stars? I'm going to give it some thought but nothing comes to mind.
     


  10. apropos

    apropos Distinguished Member

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    Sure enough, walk around certain boutiques and more and more Mainlanders are there, dropping huge sums of money (in cash, naturally), buying--shall we say--less than tasteful items.
    Understatement of the century. [​IMG] I place the blame squarely on them (and the Russians) for the following example of 'progress' - the evolution of the Polo Ralph Lauren polo shirt:

    small monochrome polo player -> small multicolor polo player -> big number, small monochrome polo plater -> big number, big monochrome polo player -> big number, big multicolour polo player -> big number, big monochrome polo players -> -> big number, big multicolour polo players

    [​IMG]

    I predict for A/W 2009, a line of 10 multicolour polo players across the front of the shirt, complete with flashing LEDs and electronic whinnying.
     


  11. rsgould

    rsgould Well-Known Member

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    There are a number of brands introducing product lines solely for the Chinese market. Vuitton, Gucci, Boss, and Zegna come to mind. Wouldn't be shocked at all if RL does the same thing in coming seasons--or maybe they already do.

    So far, the aforementioned product lines have a few things in common: 1) they are ugly, 2) they feature incredibly garish logos or trademarked patterns (right up there with giant polo players), 3) workmanship is lower but prices are the same as products for Euro/US market, 4) pairings of navy and black.*


    *If a light blue shirt with a navy tie is the "Italian background", than certainly a navy jacket over black pants is the Mainland equivalent--and Boss is putting this in the windows in boutiques across China)
     


  12. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior Member

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    I thought this thread was supposed to be about Cantonese cuisine which I believe truly is the best of the different styles of chinese cooking.
     


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