fire-red, gas-blue, ghost-green

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by johnapril, May 9, 2006.

  1. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Why does Scott Fitzgerald repeat this phrase in both Babylon Revisited and Tender is the Night? Can an author plagiarize his own work?
     
  2. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    No, you can't plagiarize yourself. You can however, quote yourself. And that's exactly what he did.

    Jon.
     
  3. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    No, you can't plagiarize yourself. You can however, quote yourself. And that's exactly what he did.

    Jon.


    Why?
     
  4. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Why?

    Chuck Norris, he won't allow it.

    Jon.
     
  5. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Maybe had had wit-block for a while.
     
  6. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Homer used the phrase "wine-dark" to describe blood all over the Iliad. Maybe Fitzgerald was attempting to color his work in this classical manner. But to only do it once. It strikes me as an accident, unintentional.
     
  7. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Fitzgerald seemed fond of colorful prose, eggs and all. His style is entirely distinctive.
     
  8. 4Mica

    4Mica Senior member

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    Homer used the phrase "wine-dark" to describe blood all over the Iliad. Maybe Fitzgerald was attempting to color his work in this classical manner. But to only do it once. It strikes me as an accident, unintentional.

    He also used it to describe the sea in the Odyssey, the plot thickens. (Actually, Homer's use is a device that is used in oral epic poetry)
     
  9. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    He also used it to describe the sea in the Odyssey, the plot thickens. (Actually, Homer's use is a device that is used in oral epic poetry)

    Thank you for the term. I noticed in both of Fitzgerald's stories there is an element of incest, and the revelation of the incest is made soon after this particularly colorful phrasing. Does anyone know what the neon lights might have been a reference to in 1920s Paris?
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Homer used the phrase "wine-dark" to describe blood all over the Iliad. Maybe Fitzgerald was attempting to color his work in this classical manner. But to only do it once. It strikes me as an accident, unintentional.

    didn't he use that to describe the sea, as well?
     
  11. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    didn't he use that to describe the sea, as well?

    Yes, everything was pretty much wine-dark.
     
  12. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    Fitzgerald was a pretty gifted symbolist. Remember Jay Gatsby staring off into the distance at the green light situated on the end of Daisy's dock in East Egg? In this case, I think Fitz used green to describe the American Dream of wealth and prestige, embodied in Daisy. The Valley of Ashes? Dr. Eckleburg's eyes?
     
  13. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Fitzgerald was a pretty gifted symbolist. Remember Jay Gatsby staring off into the distance at the green light situated on the end of Daisy's dock in East Egg? In this case, I think Fitz used green to describe the American Dream of wealth and prestige, embodied in Daisy. The Valley of Ashes? Dr. Eckleburg's eyes?

    Yes, like that. I had thought perhaps the red, blue, and green might refer to a red light district. And that might foreshadow the mentioning of incest in the plot.
     

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