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Finding Bigfoot

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by idfnl, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    ^Potent stuff, snake venom--a real witches' brew of nasty toxins. An unpleasant fact is that rattlesnake venom in the USA has become a good deal more toxic in recent decades. There are several theories about this--transmittal from the extremely toxic Mojave rattlesnake through hybridization, or that the snakes are in an "arms race" with prey species of rodents that are developing more immunity or resistance to venom.
     
  2. Philip1978

    Philip1978 Senior member

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    Nothing new to post?
     
  3. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    ^It would seem that idfnl has given up fighting the good fight for the Big Guy. He was the heart and soul of this thread, really. I was just mere skeptic and naysayer. It saddens me to see this thread become moribund. It has been one of my three favorite threads in the decade I've been on SF. The others were the one about animals fighting and the one I started about ghosts.
     
  4. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    I see that Discovery Channel on their "Destination America" subdivision (or whatever it may be) is planning to run a show on "Killing Bigfoot." The hunters are a group of rustic looking Southern white males styling themselves the Gulf Coast Bigfoot Research Association. Their plan is to bag one for science. They say only an adult male BF carcass will prove the existence of the critters. (I don't know why a juvenile female wouldn't establish their existence just as conclusively, but that's what they said.) The promotional photo shows them clad in ghillie suits. Let us hope they don't shoot each other by mistake! Anyway it is scheduled to air this Friday (October 17).
     
  5. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    I wonder if that's the guy who approached me to do a Bigfoot hunting show.

    lefty
     
  6. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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  7. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    Great to see this thread revived. Isn't this supposed to be an "enhanced" version of the PGF to prove that "Patty" is walking like a normal man?

    On another note, since Dr. Brian Sykes of Oxford was often mentioned in this thread, I was surprised to discover that he was the author of a book I had acquired and read some year back entitled Seven Daughters of Eve. It was about seven women in prehistory who left their genetic imprint on many contemporary humans, with imaginative accounts of what their lives might have been like.

    Well, in a few weeks it will have been 57 years since Jerry Crew discovered the famous tracks by his bulldozer. It is really quite amazing what a tenacious, durable modern myth that prank created.

    Oh, I just saw that a woman in South Carolina had taken a pretty good photo of a "lizard man." If that thing is not a costume hoax, this world is a far more complex (and scary) place than I ever imagined.
     
  8. Hombre Secreto

    Hombre Secreto Senior member

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    Can't taking a bunch of aspirin thin the blood out again?
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2015
  9. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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  10. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    idfnl hasn't been heard from in a while so I would say yes.

    lefty
     
  11. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    Since this delectable thread has just been resuscitated, I thought I would mention an interesting and entertaining book I just purchased,Abominable Science by Daniel Loxton and Donald R. Prothero. This book was originally published in hardcover in 2013, but the paperback, which I discovered at the local B&N, only came out this year. This book is a witty and entertaining critique of the "science" of cryptozoology. I might mention that I was an early member of the International Society of Cryptozoology, which attempted to tackle these matters scientifically. It folded many years ago. Anyway, the book analyzes the evidence for four "star" crypto critters--Bigfoot, the Yeti, the sea serpent (with special focus on the British Columbian version known as Cadborosaurus) and the Mokele-Mbembe (a dinosaur or dinosaur-like beast reputed to live in central Africa).

    The authors pretty well demolish the cases for the existence of any of the these creatures. With regard to Bigfoot, I was gratified to see how closely their arguments parallel those I have raised in this thread. On the matter of the Yeti, it was interesting to learn that the Dalai Lama, who ought to be in a good position to know, believes that the legend is simply based on brown bears.

    Still, I would not discount the possibility that a few large animals remain to be discovered in remote parts of the world or in its oceans.

    On a separate note, Bigfoot buffs will often argue that the absence of BFs from the North American fossil record is meaningless. With that in mind, I consulted Bjorn Kurten and Elaine Anderson's monumental work Pleistocene Mammals of North America. I checked for every large mammal currently native to North America. By "large" I mean animals like woodchucks and skunks on up. I didn't bother with really small stuff like mice, rats, bats, voles and such. And what did I find? Every larger mammal currently extant is well represented in the Pleistocene fossil deposits. Doesn't that tell you something?
     

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