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Finding Bigfoot

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by idfnl, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    As I recall, the natives of New Guinea were supposed to have Neanderthal DNA. I know that Melanesians are claimed to have the DNA of the newly discovered, Neanderthal-ish Denisovans.

    I guess the question of the origins of the Australian Aborigines is complex. Some investigatprs posit multiple migrations of different human groups.

    On a related note, I have recently learned of the Solutrean Hypothesis that North America was partially settled by European immigrants during the latter part of the Wisconsinian glaciation. This seems plausible to me. I have long noted that the Northeastern forest Indians, to judge from the portraits of such notables as Joseph Brant (supposedly an ancestor of mine), Little Turtle and Tecumseh, look much more "Caucasoid" than their Western counterparts. I am aware that DNA analyses supposedly show all the American Indians to be descended from a single Asian, migration. However, as I have said before, I remain profoundly distrustful of a lot of these DNA analyses, even though some might say this puts me in the same league as Flat Earthers, Young Earthers and moon mission deniers.

    Coincidentally, a couple of weeks ago I mentioned Julia Pastrana, the Mexican "ape-woman" in this thread. I just noticed on the Net that her remains are finally getting a decent burial.
     
  2. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Its also heavily speculated that Vikings made it to N America way before Colombus did.



    _______


    This vid shows shit until the last few seconds until the comparison is done. Still very inconclusive. Note, night vision changes the potential Sasquatche's colors:



    http://wildmanohio.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-bigfoot-video.html
     
  3. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    I don't think that's very speculative, and cod fishermen from England and other places most likely bumped into America before Colombus as well.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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  5. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    It's cool that there is good evidence of Viking presence on Baffin, but it is hardly a big surprise. Look at the map on this page and you'll see why:

    http://www.archeurope.com/index.php?page=map---viking-settlement-in-greenland

    "It's speculated" covers a wide range of sins, up to and including that Chariot of the Gods bullshit and the LaRouchian nonsense about Phoenician explorers discovering NA 3,000 years ago. Learn to be a little more skeptical, unless you genuinely enjoy sucking up the ravings of hucksters, conmen and lunatics.
     
  6. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    ^^ What about Zecharia Sitchin?

    Wrote a bunch of books based on the premise that there is a planet called Nibiru on a 3600 year elliptical orbit whose population the "Anunnaki" visited Earth in the distant past and believes Sumerian culture was spawned by it and that Sumerian mythology reflects the view.

    Sold millions.
     
  7. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Set the quality to HD



    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2013
  8. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    Like I said, the ravings of hucksters, conmen and lunatics.
     
  9. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    I suppose it is not impossible that the New World may have been visited by Phoenicians, Egyptians, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, Celts, Chinese, Polynesians or whomever, but the fact remains that if it was, it was of no historical consequence. Columbus' "discovery" had enormous historical consequences. Not long ago I read a book entitled Grey Wolf that made a halfway plausible case that Hitler actually didn't die in the bunker in 1945 but escaped to Patagonia and died there of natural causes in the early 1960s. Again, whether he died of suicide in Berlin on April 30, 1945 or died in obscurity in exile in Patagonia is inconsequential. After April 1945 he permanently ceased to be a player on the world stage. That's about how I feel on the question of whether some luckless Phoenician mariners might have been blown over to the New World. They never made it back, and that was that. A lot of these hypotheses have their origin in 19th century racism: The comparatively high levels of civilization achieved by the Aztecs, Mayans and Incas were an embarrassment to the white supremacists of that era, who posited that they must have been jump-started by visitors from "higher' (e.g., white) civilizations.

    That the Norse visited and briefly settled in North America is certainly non-controversial. Lusty fellows though they may have been, I doubt they would have been able to have had a significant impact on the genetic composition of the Northeastern Indians.
     
  10. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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  11. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    This is claimed to be a BF climbing and shaking a tree....


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
  12. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    FTFY
     
  13. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Point taken and largely agreed with, but some minor considerations:

    The Hollywood version of chaos theory aside (butterfly flaps wings leading to hurricane in Japan), we have no proof if they were inconsequential. A mixing of Norse with an Indian tribe may have set in a variation on that tribe that over a series of generations that led to a resistance to a disease. Or seeing a white skinned man led to a legend that led to a significant event that changed history. Or the reverse, a Norse sees indians for the first time and that has a knock on effect within his own culture, who knows, maybe leading to Columbus hearing a story as a boy that caused him to seek the new world.

    In most cases these events lead to dead ends, but you cant discount the potential within it to change history. That James Burke show Connections explores these kinds of minor events leading to world changing things very well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2013
  14. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    I just saw in the paper today that an episode of "Finding Bigfoot" being aired tonight deals with the Orang Pendek of Sumatra. Of all the crypto man-beasts, this one might well be a real animal. As I recall (without googling the topic), an Englishwoman with scientific credentials claimed to have seen one and said it was definitely an ape. My Dutch grandmother had lived in Sumatra with her husband, who was an army officer and a keen outdoorsman, spoke as if the Orang Pendek were a very familiar animal. However, her English was even worse than my rudimentary Dutch, so communication between us was kind of garbled, and she was rather on the dingy side anyway.
     
  16. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    The Sumatran Rat Monkey was the cause of the outbreak in Dead Alive. In my opinion, if there's anything living in Sumatra we should kill it. Nuke the whole country from orbit, it's the only way to be sure.
     
  17. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    You do realise that Sumatra isn't a country right? Oh I almost for got you're 'merkin of course you don't.
     
  18. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    Good job getting the film reference.
     
  19. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Merkins don't make films.
     
  20. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    In this case it was a Kiwi.
     

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