• We would like to welcome Craftsman Clothing back as an official Affiliate Vendor. Craftsman Clothing is a brand for the refined men who want to look good with minimal effort, and care about products that are well-made. In additon to being a go-to brand for all things essential, Craftsman Clothing also offers bespoke outerwear that’s uniquely crafted for you. Please visit their thread and give them a warm welcome.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

lineate

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2012
Messages
128
Reaction score
40
Man, you guys move quick! I got buried in work and you've gone from the virtues of MiUSA straight through to what bag to pack for what trip. Lovely.

oh my. I'd totally forgotten to list my 48 hour. I love that bag - really great to carry on a plane but not as great when carrying it to a meeting but I may try that this time. I'm only with the client for 3 hours in the morning then totally solo the rest of the time. The 48 might be a good solution. The medium duffle is way overkill for this trip...
This made me laugh. I'm not proud to admit it, but I've definitely done a quick (last minute) business trip to Spain out of my standard briefcase. Just a change of shirt, underwear, socks, toiletries, and laptop and off we go.

The MiUSA conversation is particularly interesting to me. I am American, grew up in New York, but have lived in London for 10 years now. It's only been the last few years that my "American-ness" has started to mean a lot more to me. When I was growing up, social scene or subculture was everything. You were judged by music, books, films, whatever. I don't know if it's getting deeper into my 30s or what, but where I came from is starting to feel like a bigger part of who I am. Much bigger than those other cultural touchpoints that felt so big.

The downside is that I've been buying stuff like Filson and Red Wing that I could have easily stollen from my Dad or Grandpa should I have stayed in the States. And I'm often paying European prices, which is insane. But do I wait until my next trip to the US? Of course not, I gotta have it now.
 

OtterMeanGreen

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
3,429
Reaction score
1,386
Man, you guys move quick! I got buried in work and you've gone from the virtues of MiUSA straight through to what bag to pack for what trip. Lovely.



This made me laugh. I'm not proud to admit it, but I've definitely done a quick (last minute) business trip to Spain out of my standard briefcase. Just a change of shirt, underwear, socks, toiletries, and laptop and off we go.

The MiUSA conversation is particularly interesting to me. I am American, grew up in New York, but have lived in London for 10 years now. It's only been the last few years that my "American-ness" has started to mean a lot more to me. When I was growing up, social scene or subculture was everything. You were judged by music, books, films, whatever. I don't know if it's getting deeper into my 30s or what, but where I came from is starting to feel like a bigger part of who I am. Much bigger than those other cultural touchpoints that felt so big.

The downside is that I've been buying stuff like Filson and Red Wing that I could have easily stollen from my Dad or Grandpa should I have stayed in the States. And I'm often paying European prices, which is insane. But do I wait until my next trip to the US? Of course not, I gotta have it now.

What made you pack up and move to London, if you don't mind me asking? How is "American Pride" viewed in London?
 

OtterMeanGreen

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
3,429
Reaction score
1,386
The 48 hour wins the day. One night business trip. One bag.

Did decide to add my wider leather strap instead of the cotton webbed one it comes with. I think it just looks better.

View attachment 1124656
Nice Patina on your Otter Green 48HR, how are you liking it as it gets more broken in? Also that's a nice looking crocodile leather shoulder strap you got there (at least from this angle) :fonz:
 

FilsonDude

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Messages
129
Reaction score
92

M635Guy

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
8,088
Reaction score
19,528
For a damp, drizzly, cool day, I'm wearing my Filson Lovat moleskin workshirt today - perfect :)
 

Stratkat

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2018
Messages
439
Reaction score
193
I love both Filson and Levi’s but man that’s steep for a denim jacket
It’s not very pretty either! I don’t understand the collaboration thing. If I want levi’s I’ll buy Levi’s, if I want Filson I’ll buy that. Don’t even get me started on a Harley Davidson F150!!!
 

lineate

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2012
Messages
128
Reaction score
40
What made you pack up and move to London, if you don't mind me asking? How is "American Pride" viewed in London?
I came for work, for six months, and ended up loving it and having quite an adventure. Now I’m married to a born Londoner who will never live anywhere else, so I guess I’m here to stay?

“American Pride” is a bit of a weird one. I work in advertising, so you have to take everything I say with a grain of salt because I think about brand and branding many thousands of times more than a “normal” person.

I have a good friend who is a bit older than me, Scottish, and so down with Americana it’s unreal. He can nerd out on American provenance and heritage stories for anything from military surplus to Engineered Gaments reference points to New Balance trainers. All balanced with a healthy love of football (soccer) that is just beyond me. We can talk about these things passionately.

But that’s in my bubble, one extreme.

My immediate colleagues don’t think of me as that American at all, weirdly. They think I’m more into Japanese minimalism and stuff

In the middle, most people I know have been to, or desire to, visit the US.

Then there’s the other side.

Once, when I first moved to London, I went out to the countryside for a weekend with a friend. We’d been drinking, having a great time, and went to get some food late night at a chip shop. We were talking, I was probably quite loud. I only have an outdoor voice. A woman, a total stranger, in front of in the line to order turned around and punched me square in the face. Like, full on, proper punch that made me whip around. Killer hook.

I said “what the fuck was that for?”

“I always wanted to punch an American”

Nice.

Having had a few, I was stupid enough to have said, “do you feel better now?”

She hauled off and punched me on the other side of my face, and said, “yeah.”

That was early 2009 I think, and literally the one time I’ve had an overtly adverse reaction in the U.K.

Today the American “brand” is having different challenges. But I’ve never had an exchange quite like that one.
 
Last edited:

M635Guy

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
8,088
Reaction score
19,528
I came for work, for six months, and ended up loving it and having quite an adventure. Now I’m married to a born Londoner who will never love anywhere else, and we have a London baby, so I guess I’m here to stay?

“American Pride” is a bit of a weird one. I work in advertising, so you have to take everything I say with a grain of salt because I think about brand and branding many thousands of times more than a “normal” person.

I have a good friend who is a bit older than me, Scottish, and so down with Americana it’s unreal. He can nerd out on American provenance and heritage stories for anything from military surplus to Engineered Gaments reference points to New Balance trainers. All balanced with a healthy love of football (soccer) that is just beyond me. We can talk about these things passionately.

But that’s in my bubble, one extreme.

My immediate colleagues don’t think of me as that American at all, weirdly. They think I’m more into Japanese minimalism and stuff

In the middle, most people I know have been to, or desire to, visit the US.

Then there’s the other side.

Once, when I first moved to London, I went out to the countryside for a weekend with a friend. We’d been drinking, having a great time, and went to get some food late night at a chip shop. We were talking, I was probably quite loud. I only have an outdoor voice. A woman, a total stranger, in front of in the line to order turned around and punched me square in the face. Like, full on, proper punch that made me whip around. Killer hook.

I said “what the fuck was that for?”

“I always wanted to punch an American”

Nice.

Having had a few, I was stupid enough to have said, “do you feel better now?”

She hauled off and punched me on the other side of my face, and said, “yeah.”

That was early 2009 I think, and literally the one time I’ve had an overtly adverse reaction in the U.K.

Today the American “brand” is having different challenges. But I’ve never had an exchange quite like that one.
That's.
Crazy.

I travel a lot, and I do notice that Americans tend to be very loud, but sheesh.
 

M635Guy

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
8,088
Reaction score
19,528
It’s now funny, and one of my favourite travel stories.
You have a better sense of humor than I do. I did have a guy poke at me a couple times once when I was overseas, which I ignored, which made him even more persnickety. After his second (missed) swing, he was wondering how he wound up face down on the floor (and complaining quite loudly about it). It's amazing and occasionally useful how little people understand their own balance. I've had a couple more sinister things happen traveling over the years that keep me pretty alert when I'm out and around...

I'm generally very easy-going...until I'm not. Honestly not sure how I would have reacted in your place, though I know I wouldn't hit a woman unless I genuinely needed to defend myself.
 

OtterMeanGreen

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
3,429
Reaction score
1,386
It’s not very pretty either! I don’t understand the collaboration thing. If I want levi’s I’ll buy Levi’s, if I want Filson I’ll buy that. Don’t even get me started on a Harley Davidson F150!!!
If that's what you like then that's what you like. However there are a lot of us here who appreciate and own Filson Collaborations and see the merit in them. I am a future Filson collab owner (Filson x Stanley Flask) and am really excited about it. Sure I could've paid $15 less and just bought one from Stanley, but owning such a rare piece (once it's discontinued) is a hard thing to pass on. @Tom Lebrando actually owns a Filson x Levis Cruiser and I'm sure there was something special that prompted him to pay for it. The Filson x Levis Trucker jacket is one of the most popular Filson garment items in modern day time, and even when used, they command high dollars, I've seen them reach $1000. The Pendleton blanket is technically a collaboration and I know @TinMan3 appreciates his.

Plus collaborations allow for some pretty exclusive stuff and make up for what Filson lacks in their abilities. Like the Buck Knife or Jacob Bromwell Flask, they reach out to those that are experts in particular fields. I think it's a positive. Imagine the success Filson would've had if they did a collaboration with their failed Passage Line, and they picked Tumi. That might've been a much greater success, and not a sore spot for the company, like it is today
 
Last edited:

Featured Sponsor

HOW OFTEN DO YOU SHOP FOR CLOTHES ONLINE?

  • I mainly buy my clothes online.

  • I shop online only if there is a sale.

  • I shop online when shipping and returns are free.

  • I shop in store only for very expensive items I want to try on.

  • I mainly shop in store.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
425,152
Messages
9,131,413
Members
191,895
Latest member
Lonelyguy2019

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Top