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TinMan3

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FWIW Shinola is an exceptionally shady company and Filson is continuing a bad mistake by associating with them
Ahh but Filson and Shinola have similar ownership. I don’t know the details of the ownership structure but they are both owned in whole or more likely in part by Bedrock Holdings. You may have read on here that the Filson of the ‘90s and 2000’s no longer exists today, this would be why. Filson today is a Marketing Company selling an image and feeding off of the goodwill of its loyal customers. Yes, they still offer some excellent products and they still have manufacturing plants in the USA, but I’m not sure I would say they are too far different from Shinola. Just an opinion.

Another opinion, Shinola makes a quality timepiece that while it is overpriced remarkably, should last a very long time, and they will fix or replace for life. The ‘Assembled in the USA’ mantra is BS and they really pride themselves on their commitment to Detroit. One would think they singlehandedly brought Detroit out of bankruptcy. Anyways, I find both Filson and Shinola to be interesting marketing companies who have mastered selling high priced products to the masses using similar strategies. Not really all that different of an approach.
 

speedy611

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FWIW Shinola is an exceptionally shady company and Filson is continuing a bad mistake by associating with them
Would you care to elaborate? I have no ax to grind, just curious. I’ve never seen a Shinola product I’d want to buy or own, and don’t have any resonance with the Detroit heritage. But they must have some sort of customer base, or be on some loss-making equity funded expansion plan, given their high prices and retail locations...
 

Teger

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Ahh but Filson and Shinola have similar ownership. I don’t know the details of the ownership structure but they are both owned in whole or more likely in part by Bedrock Holdings. You may have read on here that the Filson of the ‘90s and 2000’s no longer exists today, this would be why. Filson today is a Marketing Company selling an image and feeding off of the goodwill of its loyal customers. Yes, they still offer some excellent products and they still have manufacturing plants in the USA, but I’m not sure I would say they are too far different from Shinola. Just an opinion.

Another opinion, Shinola makes a quality timepiece that while it is overpriced remarkably, should last a very long time, and they will fix or replace for life. The ‘Assembled in the USA’ mantra is BS and they really pride themselves on their commitment to Detroit. One would think they singlehandedly brought Detroit out of bankruptcy. Anyways, I find both Filson and Shinola to be interesting marketing companies who have mastered selling high priced products to the masses using similar strategies. Not really all that different of an approach.
Sure, but at least Filson is making their products in the US -- they aren't making them overseas, adding a final stitch in the US, and stamping "US MADE" on them.

Would you care to elaborate? I have no ax to grind, just curious. I’ve never seen a Shinola product I’d want to buy or own, and don’t have any resonance with the Detroit heritage. But they must have some sort of customer base, or be on some loss-making equity funded expansion plan, given their high prices and retail locations...
 

mgrennier

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Sure, but at least Filson is making their products in the US -- they aren't making them overseas, adding a final stitch in the US, and stamping "US MADE" on them.



I'm originally from Detroit and have a strong affinity to the city (I lived there most of my life) and to the revitalization of the inner city. I've also been able to visit the Shinola factory in downtown Detroit and have seen people making the watches. Are many of the components outsourced? Uh, yes. Of course.

But to walk in that store/factory and see people making products, (I don't even care if it's the last step in the process or not), to see inner city Detroiters working, to see the number of shops, bars and restaurants open around that area, makes me happy to be from Detroit and a proud American. Hell, there's even a Filson store two doors down from the Detroit location. The Detroit Shinola store has had a good crowd nearly every time I've been there.

Are the Shinola products over-priced? Hell yea they are. Does that matter to me? Hell no it doesn't. (BTW, ever buy a Louis Vuitton bag? Talk about over-priced).

Shinola has priced their products at a price-point that attempts to establish themselves as a "premium" brand. I've seen their leather goods up close, I own several pieces, I own at least one Shinola watch, as well. (And bought both my kids Shinola's as high school graduation presents).

In other words, I'm a big supporter of their brand and I hope they continue to add to the revitalization of my (former) city. It's a good story, and I'm OK with that.
 

OtterMeanGreen

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Check out the leather on this 0602 YKK First Edition #256. I think it looks awesome, especially paired up with Otter Green. With shipping it's only $170, crazy good deal!

256 1.PNG
 

bucky0486

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So, what's the consensus of the best airplane carry-on bag? I will always also carry it with the 256 briefcase.

I currently have a medium travel bag and, as someone recently mentioned, when it's full it's really hard to carry, especially when running through an airport terminal to catch a connecting flight. I'm interested in expanding my arsenal to include a carry-on dedicated bag (I'll continue to use the MTB for road trips).

I've always wanted a medium duffel bag. Maybe that would fit the bill? I'd prefer a bag without rollers.

In case you're interested, I also have the 256 original briefcase, zippered tote, large 2-wheeled rolling checked bag, travel kit (dopp kit bag), tool roll, and garment bag, all in tan. I also have a medium suede pouch, leather wallet, and a small snap suede wallet. Not to mention shirts, jackets, and coats.
 
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pnwprice

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So, what's the consensus of the best airplane carry-on bag? I will always also carry it with the 256 briefcase.

I currently have a medium travel bag and, as someone recently mentioned, when it's full it's really hard to carry, especially when running through an airport terminal to catch a connecting flight. I'm interested in expanding my arsenal to include a carry-on dedicated bag (I'll continue to use the MTB for road trips).

I've always wanted a medium duffel bag. Maybe that would fit the bill? I'd prefer a bag without rollers.

In case you're interested, I also have the 256 original briefcase, zippered tote, large 2-wheeled rolling checked bag, travel kit (dopp kit bag), tool roll, and garment bag, all in tan. I also have a medium suede pouch, leather wallet, and a small snap suede wallet. Not to mention shirts, jackets, and coats.
258 or OG Pullman all day.
 
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bucky0486

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258 or OG Pullman all day.
My first ever Filson bag was the MTB, and at the time I was torn between the MTB and the Medium Pullman. I ended up with the MTB because I didn't think I'd like having to strap all of my clothes to the side walls of the Pullman every single time.

Also, doesn't the Pullman have the same awkward shoulder carry as the MTB that I'm trying to avoid?
 

Soletrane

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I'm originally from Detroit and have a strong affinity to the city (I lived there most of my life) and to the revitalization of the inner city. I've also been able to visit the Shinola factory in downtown Detroit and have seen people making the watches. Are many of the components outsourced? Uh, yes. Of course.

But to walk in that store/factory and see people making products, (I don't even care if it's the last step in the process or not), to see inner city Detroiters working, to see the number of shops, bars and restaurants open around that area, makes me happy to be from Detroit and a proud American. Hell, there's even a Filson store two doors down from the Detroit location. The Detroit Shinola store has had a good crowd nearly every time I've been there.

Are the Shinola products over-priced? Hell yea they are. Does that matter to me? Hell no it doesn't. (BTW, ever buy a Louis Vuitton bag? Talk about over-priced).

Shinola has priced their products at a price-point that attempts to establish themselves as a "premium" brand. I've seen their leather goods up close, I own several pieces, I own at least one Shinola watch, as well. (And bought both my kids Shinola's as high school graduation presents).

In other words, I'm a big supporter of their brand and I hope they continue to add to the revitalization of my (former) city. It's a good story, and I'm OK with that.
Great post. It's easy to fall prey to enthusiast snobbery (especially if you are a recovering watch snob like me) about Shinola marketing and products. But it's hard to argue that providing decent jobs and economic growth to Detroit is a bad thing.

On the product side, I have a good friend who loves Shinola watches. He likes the retro 'Motor City' styling and bump up in quality from the usual department store fare and absolutely does not want the maintenance cost of a mechanical watch (i.e. several hundred for an overhaul). So there is definitely a customer base. And I don't think it's always just a case of the people not knowing better to buy a JDM Seiko or a Damasko or something.

Funny enough, I have visited the Shinola store in Tribeca quite a few times (they have a decent coffee shop at the entrance) but the only thing I have ever bought there is my Filson heavy tin tote ($110). It's a cool place but I am less tempted by the leather and steel trinkets than I once was. It might be a place, though, where I would consider buying a gift for my brother's or a good buddy's milestone birthday.
 

Soletrane

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My first ever Filson bag was the MTB, and at the time I was torn between the MTB and the Medium Pullman. I ended up with the MTB because I didn't think I'd like having to strap all of my clothes to the side walls of the Pullman every single time.

Also, doesn't the Pullman have the same awkward shoulder carry as the MTB that I'm trying to avoid?
I have the old large carry-on which is sized and shaped similarly to the small Pullman. Truthfully, it's just 'okay' on the shoulder, but very comfortable to carry in the hands like a briefcase (compared to almost any duffle) as it's narrow rather than wide.

If my hand gets tired, I just switch to my other hand (just like Grandpa did with his massive Samsonite back in the day) ;-)
 

Teger

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my problem with shinola isn't that their products don't stack up to a rolex, but that they have openly committed fraud in the past by lying about the origins of their products as part of an elaborate marketing campaign. their 'made in america' claims were so egregious that they resulted in FTC intervention, as well as changes to how brands have to label their products (i.e. https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertanaas/2016/06/20/ftc-rules-on-made-in-america-concept-for-shinola-watches/#615030117950), of particular emphasis:

The FTC had already warned Shinola in the past about its advertising practices. When the brand took no modifying actions, the FTC was forced to act and issue instructions for them to change their collateral. The FTC is also suggesting that corrective signs be placed in boxes of timepieces that are in stores now and have not yet been sold. It is unclear if this particular action will be enforced.
this has nothing to do with what factories they own or what the contribute to detroit, and everything to do with protecting consumers and making sure that companies don't lie to them about product origins.
 

Teger

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So, what's the consensus of the best airplane carry-on bag? I will always also carry it with the 256 briefcase.

I currently have a medium travel bag and, as someone recently mentioned, when it's full it's really hard to carry, especially when running through an airport terminal to catch a connecting flight. I'm interested in expanding my arsenal to include a carry-on dedicated bag (I'll continue to use the MTB for road trips).

I've always wanted a medium duffel bag. Maybe that would fit the bill? I'd prefer a bag without rollers.

In case you're interested, I also have the 256 original briefcase, zippered tote, large 2-wheeled rolling checked bag, travel kit (dopp kit bag), tool roll, and garment bag, all in tan. I also have a medium suede pouch, leather wallet, and a small snap suede wallet. Not to mention shirts, jackets, and coats.
by carry on bag, I assume you mean something to put in the overhead bin? I find the pullman too narrow to hold two pairs of shoes horizontally (vs. vertically). I own both the small and medium duffle and would recommend the small over the medium every day of the week. the medium IME is a little big for some airline overhead bins, and is really heavy. I just traveled with the small bag and was able to comfortably fit two pairs of shoes, a dopp kit, a laptop and charger, and 3 days worth of clothes. I also much prefer the zip tote to the 256 for a personal item because of how narrow the 256 is.
 

mgrennier

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So, what's the consensus of the best airplane carry-on bag? I will always also carry it with the 256 briefcase.

I currently have a medium travel bag and, as someone recently mentioned, when it's full it's really hard to carry, especially when running through an airport terminal to catch a connecting flight. I'm interested in expanding my arsenal to include a carry-on dedicated bag (I'll continue to use the MTB for road trips).

I've always wanted a medium duffel bag. Maybe that would fit the bill? I'd prefer a bag without rollers.

In case you're interested, I also have the 256 original briefcase, zippered tote, large 2-wheeled rolling checked bag, travel kit (dopp kit bag), tool roll, and garment bag, all in tan. I also have a medium suede pouch, leather wallet, and a small snap suede wallet. Not to mention shirts, jackets, and coats.
I think the best carry on bag that Filson makes is the 48 hour duffle. I carried it earlier this week on an overnight trip to Dallas. Put my laptop and everything in it. Only carried one bag.

Then, I’m in California on a two day trip where I decided to break out the medium duffle and my 256. (Two bags). Writing this in an uber from San Francisco to San Jose.

Of the two, the 48 hour carries better as it hugs the hip a bit better than the medium duffle. It’s also much better as a “one bag solution” since you can carry your laptop straight up and down like you would ina Briefcase.

Before I left for this trip I got a little geeky and decided to weigh the 48 hour and the medium duffle. The medium duffle was easily 25% lighter than the 48 I think the extra pockets require more material which of course adds to the weight.

Not sure if this post helps or hurts your decision-making abilities but there you go.
 

bucky0486

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I think the best carry on bag that Filson makes is the 48 hour duffle. I carried it earlier this week on an overnight trip to Dallas. Put my laptop and everything in it. Only carried one bag.

Then, I’m in California on a two day trip where I decided to break out the medium duffle and my 256. (Two bags). Writing this in an uber from San Francisco to San Jose.

Of the two, the 48 hour carries better as it hugs the hip a bit better than the medium duffle. It’s also much better as a “one bag solution” since you can carry your laptop straight up and down like you would ina Briefcase.

Before I left for this trip I got a little geeky and decided to weigh the 48 hour and the medium duffle. The medium duffle was easily 25% lighter than the 48 I think the extra pockets require more material which of course adds to the weight.

Not sure if this post helps or hurts your decision-making abilities but there you go.
Thanks, that definitely helps me lean towards a medium duffle. If I'm on an airplane, I'm bringing two bags (my 256 briefcase and one for clothes/shoes/dopp kit) because I'll be traveling for more than a few days.

I find that the size of the MTB is perfect, I just don't like carrying it on my shoulder. And when fully packed, my weak arms get tired of lugging it around via the handles.
 

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