Fighters?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by Brian SD, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I agree completely. I played ice hockey for about 20 years and I could never tell by what someone looked like before getting into a fight. I've had my ass kicked by short unassuming, thinner guys and given some good beatings to 6'2" very intimidating players. One can't tell another's ability to fight by the way they look.

    I also boxed for about a year or so and the loudmouth, tattooed, I can't wait to kick your ass guys went out with a punch.

    I didn't get very far with boxing. I think it was the teacher. I am interested in learning the art of fighting and self defense, not because fighting is my favorite thing to do...

    The teacher just seemed to want me to go into the ring and just fight. I am much more comfortable when I know what I am doing. At least teach me what I am supposed to do, I am not one for getting thrown into the pool to learn to swim. Especially if someone is punching me in the meantime.

    Training for boxing was the best workout I've ever had.

    globetrotter I've never heard of the style you mentioned. I'll have to check it out...


    krav maga? california is the center for it in the US, with the best teachers. you will probrably love it, if you like boxing and hockey, you will love krav.
     
  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    This option also provide protection to your own knees and maximizes your kicking power (in this position, you would be delivering a rear kick).


    now you are getting fancy, dude.
     
  3. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    now you are getting fancy, dude.

    Also, your back is better protection than your front.
     
  4. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    that has not been my experience, on the street. my game plan has been to focus on a fast attack of strikes to the face with splayed fingers and the heel of the hand, tiger mouth and forearms to the throat, to set up sweeps and stompes to the knees, instep and ankle. I have never been in conflict with anybody who was both really good and prepared, but I have had good luck with knees.

    sure, I am publishing my game plan on the internet. if you want to beat me up so much that you do reasearch on me to prepare, well, I figure you are going to beat me up, anyway.
     
  5. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Also, your back is better protection than your front.

    hmmmm, not sure I agree with you. you have a number of pretty vital things behind you, not to mention it is very easy to take somebody down from behind. even in sparing, I have seen people use that assumption and found themselves sitting down. but then again, I don't argue with middle aged men who still feel comfortable doing a back kick.
     
  6. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    sure, I am publishing my game plan on the internet. if you want to beat me up so much that you do reasearch on me to prepare, well, I figure you are going to beat me up, anyway.

    Watch out for Charlie is a thing of the past. We must now watch out for the Coppley Natalie Imbruglia model in real Loro Piana cloth, as tailored by Ferragamo (outsourcing division) for Zegna for Zegna Z for Mr. T.
     
  7. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    hmmmm, not sure I agree with you. you have a number of pretty vital things behind you, not to mention it is very easy to take somebody down from behind. even in sparing, I have seen people use that assumption and found themselves sitting down. but then again, I don't argue with middle aged men who still feel comfortable doing a back kick.

    It is in the turning, the twist from front to back, that the opponent's fist glances off your back and then you have him.
     
  8. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    It is in the turning, the twist from front to back, that the opponent's fist glances off your back and then you have him.

    again, I do not argue with middle aged men who still feel confrotable doing back kicks.
     
  9. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    again, I do not argue with middle aged men who still feel confrotable doing back kicks.

    Thought of one more: this method preserves the calfskin of the shoe, whereas the double leather sole can take the abuse and no one ever knows the better.
     
  10. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    In a tournament, that would be a foul.

    In a streetfight, the best way to manipulate a situation in to a knee breaking opportunity is to pretend you are giving up and to turn and walk away. It is as your opponent charges after you that his knee is exposed.


    Not in all tournaments. I've fought all of one NHB tournament, and knee strikes were completely legit. In some tournaments, knee sweeps are permitted, which in practice means that round houses to the knees were permitted. Really changes the dynamics of the fight. In most tournaments though, yes, a foul.

    So what you are talking about is a back stomp kick directly to the knees as he is lunging towards you? Ouch, that is a powerful kick, and he would definitely not have his knees in a good defensive position. Well, I've always thought that behind all that love and peace stuff that you were a badass.
     
  11. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Not in all tournaments. I've fought all of one NHB tournament, and knee strikes were completely legit. In some tournaments, knee sweeps are permitted, which in practice means that round houses to the knees were permitted. Really changes the dynamics of the fight. In most tournaments though, yes, a foul.

    So what you are talking about is a back stomp kick directly to the knees as he is lunging towards you? Ouch, that is a powerful kick, and he would definitely not have his knees in a good defensive position. Well, I've always thought that behind all that love and peace stuff that you were a badass.


    Wow. I'd never have imagined such strikes were permissable at toureys?

    As to your second comment, I'm only trying to protect my shoes.
     
  12. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Thought of one more: this method preserves the calfskin of the shoe, whereas the double leather sole can take the abuse and no one ever knows the better.


    that is why I wear cordovan boots
     
  13. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Also, your back is better protection than your front.

    Not really. Getting behind someone is one of the Holy Grails of some BJJ and other Jiujitsu techniques. If you get up close behind them, a hard knee strike to the hamstring buckes an opponent's knees (so that he ends up in an arched kneeling position with no leverage), and if you can apply a choke, the fight is pretty much over unless the dude is insanely strong (which happens). I was always sort of a dirty fighter, so when I applied the choke with my strong arm, I would use the hand from the leveraging arm (left in my case) to grab the sleeve of my gi so that it covered his mouth and nose, making breathing even more difficult. As the choke tightened, so would the feeling of asphyxiation. Unless the dude was crazy, that was a tap out.

    Edit: Typos.
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    when I applied the choke with my strong arm, I would use the hand from the leveraging arm (left in my case) to grab the sleeve of my gi so that it covered his mouth and nose, making breathing even more difficult. As the choke tightened, so would the feeling of asphyxiation. Unless the dude was crazy, that was a tap out.

    Edit: Typos.


    cute.
     
  15. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Not really. Getting behind someone is one of the Holy Grails of some BJJ and other Jiujitsu techniques. If you get up close behind them, a hard knee strike to the hamstring buckes an opponent's knees (so that he ends up in an arched kneeling position with no leverage), and if you can apply a choke, the fight is pretty much over unless the dude is insanely strong (which happens). I was always sort of a dirty fighter, so when I applied the choke with my strong arm, I would use the hand from the leveraging arm (left in my case) to grab the sleeve of my gi so that it covered his mouth and nose, making breathing even more difficult. As the choke tightened, so would the feeling of asphyxiation. Unless the dude was crazy, that was a tap out.

    Edit: Typos.


    Yes, the technique is designed to lure punks who use tactics such those those you have described. The kick arrives in the middle of the turn and the opponent's advance.
     

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