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favorite ten. whiskey

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by scarphe, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Ok the thread was highjacked the reason for choosing ten. whiskey was the fact that there are only 2 brands thus the one could choose only one or the other. But even then the different brands have different levels of quality........ who cares it is about bourbon now.

    Well, Dickel and Jack Daniel's both have different expressions, although all those expressions are made from the same mash using the same process (except for JD's Gentleman Jack).

    Dickel has No. 8, No. 12, and the new Barrel Select. No. 12 is older than No. 8. The Barrel Select is reputedly very good, although I have not had it yet. No. 12 is okay but nothing to write home about. I have had No. 8 before, but not recently enough to write anything intelligible about it.

    JD has black label No. 7, green label No. 7 (younger, or at least younger-tasting than black label), Gentleman Jack (charcoal filtered twice), and Single Barrel. I don't particularly care for black label No. 7. I've never had either Gentleman Jack or green label No. 7. Single Barrel can hold its own with any American whiskey at a similar price point. It's very good.

    As far as bourbons go, I love the Pappy 15 and like the VWFR 12, WT Rare Breed, 1792 Ridgemont Reserve, Bulleit, Old Grand-Dad (both the 114 and the 100 proof), and several others that I've undoubtedly forgotten to mention.

    Bulleit, marketing hokum aside, is interesting in that it is distilled at the Four Roses Distillery in Lawrenceburg (by contract for Diageo) and as such is the only widely-available Four Roses bourbon in the US today. It also has the highest rye content of any bourbon being currently produced.

    I never could warm to the AH Hirsch (I only ever had the 16) -- it tasted too much like pine resin to me.
     
  2. G Man

    G Man Member

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    Jefferson Reserve.

    Its along the lines of Woodford however much smoother and i tend to sip is clean just like i do scotch. no ice, no water, just bourbon and air like the good lord intended.
     
  3. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    As for bourbon, you've tried the rest, now try the best ....

    [​IMG]
     
  4. whodini

    whodini Senior member

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    ^^^

    How available is this in say...Los Angeles?
     
  5. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    There are probably a lot of other good ones, but I like Macallan. The 30 years ones have a lot flavor and aromas, but are very smooth, mild drinking.

    I love Macallan, but I'd say you're stretching the definition of "Tennessee whiskey" -- or "bourbon" -- pretty damn far. [​IMG]
     
  6. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Bourbons:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All good stuff. The Black Maple Hill folks also make a rye whiskey that's very enjoyable for a slight change of taste.
     
  7. Dragon

    Dragon Senior member

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    I love Macallan, but I'd say you're stretching the definition of "Tennessee whiskey" -- or "bourbon" -- pretty damn far. [​IMG]

    [​IMG] I didn`t know they were talking about just TENN whisky. I thought it was a top TEN list [​IMG]
     
  8. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    ^^^

    How available is this in say...Los Angeles?


    Wally's on Westwood Blvd.
     
  9. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    As for bourbon, you've tried the rest, now try the best ....


    As always, Stax, I admire your taste. Have you tried their rye?
     
  10. pscolari

    pscolari Senior member

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    As for bourbon, you've tried the rest, now try the best ....

    [​IMG]



    Yes! My favorite. Impossible to find around Boston. Usually drink Maker's or Woodford to pass the time in between bottles.
     
  11. whodini

    whodini Senior member

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    Wally's on Westwood Blvd.
    Thank you, sir. Also found that BevMo sells the small batch version for $33. I'll finish one of those with some friends and have a full report. I tried this back in May: [​IMG] It reminded me a bit of knob with a kick at the end. The bartender knew zip about bourbons but I usually make a habit of trying something new when I see it. All she could tell me was "Well, it's 107 proof. That's strong, right?"
     
  12. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

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    I never could warm to the AH Hirsch (I only ever had the 16) -- it tasted too much like pine resin to me.

    I didn't have the negative reaction to Hirsch that you did, but I was at first underwhelmed given the price (I've only had the 16 yo, which I believe now runs north of $100 per bottle; I don't think the 20 yo is available any longer but, if it is, it would be significantly more expensive). I have since warmed to it tremendously, though I doubt I would buy it at its current price.

    With regard to some of the other comments above:

    - I've tried Black Maple Hill and like it very much. Lots of spice, and I like the name. [​IMG]

    - Blanton's is a favorite. Very smooth and mellow. Great packaging, too.

    - I still need to try Bulleit.
     
  13. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    As always, Stax, I admire your taste. Have you tried their rye?

    Thank you, sir.

    Funny you ask. I had the 18 yo rye at a restaurant bar few months ago on the recommendation of the bartender, with whom I was discussing Black Maple Hill bourbon. I don't usually drink rye, so I don't have many reference points to work with, but it was delicious. Almost sweet, but not quite. Apparently the rye is as popular as their straight bourbon, if not more so. It is expensive hootch, however.

    I second your Knob Creek suggestion. I drink that every now and then. Good stuff. I haven't tried the Hirsch Reserve. I'll give a go. [​IMG]
     
  14. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    Yes! My favorite. Impossible to find around Boston. Usually drink Maker's or Woodford to pass the time in between bottles.

    You can buy it online!
     
  15. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    - I've tried Black Maple Hill and like it very much. Lots of spice, and I like the name. [​IMG]
    BMH is currently bottled by Kentucky Bourbon Distillers (KBD), which, despite its name, does not distill anything. They buy whiskey in bulk from the various distillers, age some of it at their warehouses at the former Willett Distillery in Bardstown, and select and bottle the whiskey for their various labels. (KBD doesn't actually own the BMH label; they just bottle it.) The original BMH was bottled by Julian Van Winkle in Lawrenceburg. Since everything that he touches is fantastic, I would snap Lawrenceburg-bottled BMH up on sight. I have heard good things about the Bardstown-bottled stuff, too, although I have not tried it. KBD and other independent bottlers are going to have trouble getting good whiskey going forward. Most of them came into being during the whiskey glut of the late '80s and early '90s, when distillers had tons of aged bourbon sitting in warehouses that they were practically willing to give away. No more. A premium bourbon market has grown up, and those distilleries are now bottling and selling their old stocks themselves. The bulk market is drying up. I would assume that the unfavorable realities of the market for independent bottlers factored heavily in Julian Van Winkle's decision to come to the arrangement with Buffalo Trace that he did in the late '90s (he gets his pick of their stocks, they bottle and distribute for him).
     
  16. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

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    I just read an interesting, short article (I can't remember where) regarding how the bourbon industry has taken off in the past 15-20 years or so, mostly on the strength of higher end, small batch and single barrel bourbons. The latest thing that bourbon distillers are trying is aging in various previously used barrels (e.g. chardonnay, sherry, etc.), much like the single malt scotch distillers have done.

    Per the article, one issue with this is that, to be called "bourbon," the alcohol must be distilled in new, white oak barrels. I guess there is a technical way to get around this and still be called bourbon, but the article didn't go into much detail.
     
  17. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    Per the article, one issue with this is that, to be called "bourbon," the alcohol must be distilled in new, white oak barrels. I guess there is a technical way to get around this and still be called bourbon, but the article didn't go into much detail.

    Maybe, like some scotches, the bourbons are "finished" for a couple of years in the wine casks.

    Also, sounds like I'll have to try the BMH: what does Wally's command for it?
     
  18. bullethead

    bullethead Senior member

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    If I'm out, Maker's Mark is my default bourbon. At home, usually Basil Hayden or Michter's.
     
  19. thepataphysician

    thepataphysician Senior member

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    i like bulliet. I guess it is because of the high rye percentage, but to me it doesnt have the sugary nasty flavor of most bourbons, particularly makers.
     
  20. chronoaug

    chronoaug Senior member

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    I've enjoyed reading this thread as i am not much of an alcohol enthusiast but am trying to develop a taste for it. I think i will try a bottle of makers mark or even that buffalo's trace stuff which sounded interesting from a different site i read. I assume you all are drinking these straight, but i was also curious if there was a certain temperature it is best served at?
     

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