1. In 2018. by way of thanks for being a part of this community, we'll be choosing 16 active members of our community at random to receive a special gift and a gift certificate for one of our affiliate vendors, to represent each of our 16 years.

    Fok and the Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Fabric ends/picks/M

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by damonallan, May 12, 2005.

  1. damonallan

    damonallan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Hi gang:

    I'm doing some fabric research and I do not quite understand that ends, picks and M mean?

    Can you help me out?

    Damon
     


  2. quill

    quill Senior Member

    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2004
    Just earlier terms for warp and weft. Ends are the same as warp: the threads run vertical, top to bottom. Picks are the "fill" threads, same as weft: they run horizontal, side to side. I don't know what M stands for. But our modern term for "end on end" fabric is actually a bastardization of "end and end," which meant threads of alternating colors, side by side, that run top to bottom. As always, I could be wrong, but I think that's a close definition.
     


  3. damonallan

    damonallan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Hi. Here is an image with specifications. Â Can you answer the pics/ends concern from this. Â Also what does the M 17.5 mean? [​IMG] Gracie. Damon
     


  4. quill

    quill Senior Member

    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2004
    I don't know what the picture refers to, but I'm now guessing (based on the number 17.5) that M stands for "microns," the measure of fineness of fiber.

    Micron numbers tend to run...what?...from 22 microns down to 12 or so, depending on the fiber. Some merino wools can be 18, 17, 16 microns, some cashmeres and vicuñas even less. So that's why I'd guess that M stands for micron.

    'Course, once again, I could be totally off my rocker.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by