Ethnic foods you're supposed to like (but hate)

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by SField, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I dislike Korean food.

    Lots of things thrown together to make a crude amalgaration. Kimchee is offensive.


    Well at a decent korean restaurant you'll have up to a couple dozen small side dishes which makes things interesting, and a lot more than just kimchi.

    I think bibimbap is one of the more delicious ultra basic national dishes. I also like that koreans take a little more pride in the quality of their meat. The sesame oil and salt dip and all the other sauces that come with typical korean BBQ make it a little more interesting for me if I'm going to have a basic hearty meal.
     


  2. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I think almost all cultures have something delicious to offer. I think it's slightly unfair to hold a culture's food in contempt based on a few experiences at a couple of restaurants. I'm sure someone out there can make something you enjoy in any style of cuisine.


    Of this I am 100% certain. I'd certainly like some recommendations. However as always, combining any kind of flavors with french classical technique doesn't necessarily count as authentic food, and obviously I've had good experiences at a few places in mexico city and Bayless in chicago.

    Please, suggestions.
     


  3. unicornwarrior

    unicornwarrior Senior member

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    Of this I am 100% certain. I'd certainly like some recommendations. However as always, combining any kind of flavors with french classical technique doesn't necessarily count as authentic food, and obviously I've had good experiences at a few places in mexico city and Bayless in chicago.

    Please, suggestions.


    I didn't mean to suggest that the food was "authentic"

    Honestly I'm forgetting names at the moment, but I'd recommend several of the restaurants at the Camino Real hotel in Polanco (a district in Mexico City), for starters.

    If you walk out the backend of the hotel and take a right, walk down 2 blocks, there is a red-tiled mexican restaurant that sells amazing tacos. A slightly nicer "hole-inthewall" type of restaurant. Still relatively cheap.

    There is also a similiar mexican taco restaurant (orange-tiled) two blocks behind the sevilla palace hotel off of Reforma street. It is probably my favorite taco restaurant, ever.

    I can pull up names if I take some time to think about it (and will do eventually)

    As you can tell I tend to use hotels as reference points, as I've probably spend some time at every decent to upper scale hotel in mexico city (as well as monterrey, acapulco, san luis potosi, taxco, etc)
     


  4. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    Taco, I have never tasted on I've enjoyed.
     


  5. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim In Time Out

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    Despite the adoration of nearly everyone else I know, I do not like much of the more common types of Vietnamese I've ever had, which admittedly is not much. But especially Pho.
     


  6. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

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    And as you can see, I cited mainly Szechuan as the culprit.

    Not a great fan of Szechuan food either. It does serve its purpose up there in that area where the food in all its oily, herbed and chili-infused glory, does keep you warm. As for me, I'll stick with Cantonese and Fujianese food anytime.

    ++++++

    Back on topic, I'm not a fan of the local cuisine here, Filipino food. Yeah I love a good lechon (roasted whole pig) specially this regional kind where the cavity was stuffed with lemongrass, but on the whole, I dislike Filipino food which I find too heavy, too much sauce or too salty. I also agree with LK 'bout Korean food. It is for me, average, and I don't get the heaps of praise Korean cuisine gets- besides, it borrows a lot from Japanese cuisine anyway.
     


  7. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    name some american peasant food that is truly national. something that if you got to l.a. or nyc or atlanta, chicago, seattle, pittsburgh, americans are eating this a lot because they are poor. name it.
    White bread
     


  8. bbaquiran

    bbaquiran Senior member

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    Back on topic, I'm not a fan of the local cuisine here, Filipino food. Yeah I love a good lechon (roasted whole pig) specially this regional kind where the cavity was stuffed with lemongrass, but on the whole, I dislike Filipino food which I find too heavy, too much sauce or too salty.

    Same here, although I like sinigang when my wife makes it.
     


  9. TheIdler

    TheIdler Senior member

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    If any of you are in the OC, I recommend Taco Rosa for some reasonably priced, sit-down restaurant Mexican food. Agua MF Frescas.
    The same Taco Rosa that goes out of its way to talk about how it combines French and Spanish influences?
    Mexicans do have good produce though...Very spicy food usually occurs in societies where sophistication and good produce were scarce.
    [​IMG] I think that the best Mexican food I had was (a) in higher-end places in Mexico City, (b) on the coasts, and (c) in Oaxaca. Standouts include some moles that were incredibly well-balanced and complex, some vegetable soups that were simple but outstanding, and some red snapper-like fish rubbed on the inside with some citrus/chili combo and then grilled. Good, fresh tortillas are one of my favorite bready things in the world. I agree that Eastern European/Russian food generally sucks, but who says you're supposed to like it?
     


  10. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    Barbeque, oxtail, chitlins, cornbread, collard greens, pretty much anything cajun/creole, so gumbos, po' boys, etc.

    Just like going to somewhere and eating non-authentic tacos doesn't make you an expert on Mexican cuisine, eating shitty fried fast food served in America doesn't represent all that is American peasant food.

    How is Creole cuisine peasant food?
     


  11. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    How is Creole cuisine peasant food?

    How are gumbo and jambalaya not peasant food?
     


  12. Nananine

    Nananine Senior member

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    I'm happy to say that I don't really hate any ethnic cuisine. I can dislike individual dishes, but not the food on a whole.
     


  13. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    How are gumbo and jambalaya not peasant food?
    Cajun food I see as country folk food and can see the peasant label but creole I don't see it. While I know this is Wikipedia and all the credibility issues that brings, I think this describes the general view on creole food.
    It is vaguely similar to Cajun cuisine in ingredients (such as the holy trinity), but the important distinction is that Cajun cuisine arose from the more rustic, provincial French cooking adapted by the Acadians to Louisiana ingredients, whereas the cooking of the Louisiana Creoles tended more toward classical European styles adapted to local foodstuffs. Broadly speaking, the French influence in Cajun cuisine is descended from various French Provincial cuisines of the peasantry, while Creole cuisine evolved in the homes of well-to-do aristocrats, or those who imitated their lifestyle
     


  14. robertorex

    robertorex Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     


  15. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    Cajun food I see as country folk food and can see the peasant label but creole I don't see it.
    While I know this is Wikipedia and all the credibility issues that brings, I think this describes the generally view on creole food.


    Fair enough. I guess I wrongfully put the two together when I think of that kind of food, but there are some obvious distinctions.
     


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