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Ethnic foods you're supposed to like (but hate)

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by SField, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. Milhouse

    Milhouse Distinguished Member

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    My great grandmother made some borscht that was excellent and very different, almost every commercial one I've tried I have disliked and hot > cold for me. So I can see how most people would dislike it.

    My family was from an area that ate a lot of borscht. Even my mother knows how to make the stuff. I can't stand it. I don't like beets. On occasion, I can eat them when they are served with a salad, but that is all. I usually avoid them.
     


  2. Joseph K. Bank

    Joseph K. Bank Senior Member

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    Although I do like jalapeno poppers on the whole I am not that fond of Mexican cuisine either. On numerous occasions I have eaten at upper scale Mexican chain restaurants such as South of the Boarder, Chevys and when I was younger Chi-Chi's which I think went out of business and was never very impressed with my meals although I did enjoy certain aspects of them. I feel that many of the dishes combine too many ingredients on one plate and it becomes hard to eat. For example I feel that the lettuce from a burrito would be better on a separate dish with a salsa dressing than on top of the burrito.
     


  3. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    Although I do like jalapeno poppers on the whole I am not that fond of Mexican cuisine either. On numerous occasions I have eaten at upper scale Mexican chain restaurants such as South of the Boarder, Chevys and when I was younger Chi-Chi's which I think went out of business and was never very impressed with my meals although I did enjoy certain aspects of them. I feel that many of the dishes combine too many ingredients on one plate and it becomes hard to eat. For example I feel that the lettuce from a burrito would be better on a separate dish with a salsa dressing than on top of the burrito.

    [​IMG]
     


  4. Milhouse

    Milhouse Distinguished Member

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    Although I do like jalapeno poppers on the whole I am not that fond of Mexican cuisine either. On numerous occasions I have eaten at upper scale Mexican chain restaurants such as South of the Boarder, Chevys and when I was younger Chi-Chi's which I think went out of business and was never very impressed with my meals although I did enjoy certain aspects of them. I feel that many of the dishes combine too many ingredients on one plate and it becomes hard to eat. For example I feel that the lettuce from a burrito would be better on a separate dish with a salsa dressing than on top of the burrito.

    Chi-chis and South of the border??? You need to find a decent Mexican place, or even a street vendor that sells tacos de lengua o tortas. Rico!
     


  5. Homme

    Homme Distinguished Member

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    I agree with whoever said hummus... (when I worked in Paris, we'd never have time to eat in the kitchen so it was common for us to constantly be snacking on good hummus). I don't get why it's elevated to the level of wagyu by some people. It's a great simple food, in some ways very close to a mexican concept.

    People think that highly of it ? Wow. I've never met anyone who thought hummus was any more than a dip that works well with kafta.
     


  6. Milhouse

    Milhouse Distinguished Member

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    People think that highly of it ? Wow. I've never met anyone who thought hummus was any more than a dip that works well with kafta.

    I've walked into the breakroom and heard coworkers talking about hummus at some restaurant before. I ask, sincerely, why it is so good. They usually ramble on using wine like terminology for the hummus. Then I say that it is just mashed up garbanzos and some sesame seeds, maybe some lemon, olive oil, and paprika. . . pretty simple, pretty cheap. They look at me with disgust and say "well, you've just never had GOOD hummus then".

    There is a level of pretentiousness surrounding hummus that I can't honestly explain. Don't get me wrong, hummus is fine, I don't hate it, but to me, it is like refried beans, or lentils, or whatnot. . . cheap, poor food that is filling, not something to get all worked up about.
     


  7. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Stylish Dinosaur

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    Ethiopian food - Don't understand this "trend". Really gross food and what's the appeal of no cutlery exactly?

    Is this suddenly a "trend" in NY? I've been eating and enjoying Ethiopian food for 20+years, and the restaurants where I first ate it were already well-established when I happened along.
     


  8. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Stylish Dinosaur

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    Chi-chis and South of the border??? You need to find a decent Mexican place, or even a street vendor that sells tacos de lengua o tortas. Rico!

    YHBT
     


  9. Lel

    Lel Distinguished Member

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    British food in general, seems very bland to me and uninteresting. I'm not sure if it fits into your definition of ethnic, but I don't see how European countries should be excluded. Either way, it's really the only non-American(ized...) food that I can think of that I dislike as a whole, except for maybe Korean food. In both cases it just seems as if I could get better food from other countries that are nearby/similar.
     


  10. Milhouse

    Milhouse Distinguished Member

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    YHBT

    Gesundheit!
     


  11. SField

    SField Distinguished Member

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    British food in general, seems very bland to me and uninteresting. I'm not sure if it fits into your definition of ethnic, but I don't see how European countries should be excluded. Either way, it's really the only non-American(ized...) food that I can think of that I dislike as a whole, except for maybe Korean food. In both cases it just seems as if I could get better food from other countries that are nearby/similar.

    Consider eating at any one of Gordon Ramsey's restaurants, your mind may be changed.

    But English food provides the basis for what many americans eat. Along with German/easter european food it's just meat and potato...
     


  12. SField

    SField Distinguished Member

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    I've walked into the breakroom and heard coworkers talking about hummus at some restaurant before. I ask, sincerely, why it is so good. They usually ramble on using wine like terminology for the hummus. Then I say that it is just mashed up garbanzos and some sesame seeds, maybe some lemon, olive oil, and paprika. . . pretty simple, pretty cheap. They look at me with disgust and say "well, you've just never had GOOD hummus then".

    There is a level of pretentiousness surrounding hummus that I can't honestly explain. Don't get me wrong, hummus is fine, I don't hate it, but to me, it is like refried beans, or lentils, or whatnot. . . cheap, poor food that is filling, not something to get all worked up about.


    Holy shit are you serious? I know some people really love hummus but I didn't know it was that bad.

    It's just pureed chickpeas with tahini, sesame, bit of lemon/paprika (in israel they use za'tar sometimes) and finished with olive oil and cilantro...
     


  13. SField

    SField Distinguished Member

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    Is this suddenly a "trend" in NY? I've been eating and enjoying Ethiopian food for 20+years, and the restaurants where I first ate it were already well-established when I happened along.

    Yes east african food is a newer trend.
     


  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Is this suddenly a "trend" in NY? I've been eating and enjoying Ethiopian food for 20+years, and the restaurants where I first ate it were already well-established when I happened along.
    My guess is that you started eating it in Berkeley, where Ethiopian food is actually very good, and has been a mainstay for a long time. Don't tell people back east, but whatever food is popular in NY was probably popular with dirty Berkeley hippies at least a decade before.
     


  15. globetrotter

    globetrotter Stylish Dinosaur

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    well, in humous's defense - it is one of those things that only has a few simple ingredients, and needs to be mixed and mashed the right way. high quality olive oil, or a person making it who really knows what he is doing, can take it to a whole new level.

    there are about a dozen really well known places in israel, where the humous doesn't run more than a few bucks a plate, but have great reputations. I've seen several tv talk shows where they have politicians and celebraties (blind) taste 5 plates of humous and identify where they come from, it is considered a real example of knowing the country well.
     


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