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Effective Way To Quit Smoking

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by Olivia, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. Superfluous Man

    Superfluous Man Senior member

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    In before Butterball spambot post
     


  2. Godot

    Godot Senior member

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    Haven't smoked in over 10 years and this is what worked for me.

    Select a target date that you are going to quit. Something like 10 days to 2 weeks out. Whatever the date, make it very clear that this is going to to be your quit date (QD).

    During the time before QD, smoke as you would but hold off on your first smoke of the day until you really have to. If that's 8am, OK. If some days it's 11am, so much the better. Some days you might make it to 4pm. WOW.

    As QD approaches, make sure that you don't have anything stressful on your plate for a couple of days on QD. Treat yourself as a baby.

    On QD, start using nicotine gum or patches, but don't smoke. You will have thoughts like, "I'm on the phone, so I need to smoke" or whatever. Notice how rational these thoughts are. Expect the first few days to be a bitch, but cowboy up.

    After the first few days, whenever the urge to smoke come up, think about the first 2-3 days of quitting and ask yourself "Do I really want to go through that again?

    Good Luck[​IMG]
     


  3. schlager

    schlager Member

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    I quit three years ago -- started again about a year later. Had several week-month long quits since. Currently not smoking. I don't think you ever truly quit. But you have to think of yourself as a non-smoker. I've been off for four weeks at this point, but if I think of myself as a smoker when I have an urge it seems more logical to have a cigarette.
     


  4. Godot

    Godot Senior member

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    I quit three years ago -- started again about a year later. Had several week-month long quits since. Currently not smoking. I don't think you ever truly quit. But you have to think of yourself as a non-smoker. I've been off for four weeks at this point, but if I think of myself as a smoker when I have an urge it seems more logical to have a cigarette.

    Giving into the urge to smoke after a month clean is not logical. I suggest going to a library and looking through the existentialism section, to get a clearer look at your urges.
     


  5. Master-Classter

    Master-Classter Senior member

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    so, um are well all just working on upping our postcounts here then? Ok, I can work with that... insert opinion about smoking here
     


  6. schlager

    schlager Member

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    Think of it this way:

    "I am a smoker. I have a feeling, urge, or desire to smoke. This is normal. I smoke."

    vs.

    "I am not a smoker. I have a desire to smoke. That is an aberration. It will go away. I do not smoke."

    When the appropriate situation presents itself, a smoker smokes, a quitter quits, a drinker drinks, a crybaby crys, etc. If you categorize yourself as a *-er you are more likely to *. Therefore, if you think of yourself as a smoker it makes it harder to quit. My advice was to reprogram your mind or frame of thinking and, hopefully, make it easier to reprogram your behavior.

    If you disagree that the statement "a smoker smokes." as illogical, we have different ideas of logic.
     


  7. Godot

    Godot Senior member

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    We all have urges to do all kind of things every day and yet we manage to restrain the more self destructive or illegal of them.
    When you say you have an urge, what you are really saying is that you have a thought and some kind of physical discomfort. The thought will pass as will the physical discomfort. Deal with it.
     


  8. JacobJacob

    JacobJacob Senior member

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    This keeps me from smoking [​IMG] I am still slightly addicted to nicotine, yes, but I don't have any 'hunger' for cigarettes anymore and I can easily go without using snus for a couple of days, which I don't mind. Snus is not super-unhealthy and it seems, to me at least, as a 'mature' way to handle a nicotine intake - beside from quitting it completely of course.
     


  9. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Hi, this video might help: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Yjrk...eature=related As a reformed smoker I can tell you nobody ever really quits, you go for months without a fag and then all of a sudden the urge hits. But you will feel better, you'll live longer, you'll look younger, etc. I still get urges but watching people smoke now disgusts me. Being born with a healthy body and then voluntarily throwing that away with an expensive habit is the height of idiocy.
    Thank you for posting this. Seriously, I thank you. It was truly frightening and I will share this to friends. [​IMG]
     


  10. Fallen Angels

    Fallen Angels Senior member

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    i think i've quit cigarettes. i haven't smoked any cigarettes in 2 months or so, i don't really remember as i've lost track. i guess it helps that im not around friends who smoke. but i think it has more to do with my body catching up with my mind. i always knew smoking was bad, but i didnt care. now that i care enough about my health, it was an easy thing to give up. on top of that, i didnt want to be a "slave" to something like cigs, i didnt want something to have control over me. i had urges once in a while, but they were easy to dismiss. if u can go a week without smoking, u can go 2 weeks. and it goes on from there. my parents (who both smoke) asked me how i did it. i told them i didnt do anything. i mean, i didnt have to do anything to quit, i just had to do nothing. dont buy cigs. there's more important stuff to think about. dont tell yourself you are quitting. dont tell others you are quitting. just dont smoke and eventually you get there. i probably didnt make much sense. but it worked. and it was easier than i ever imagined. btw i was a daily smoker for 10 years.
     


  11. *intellect*

    *intellect* Well-Known Member

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    wear a rubberband, snap your wrist everytime you feel the urge to smoke.
    your brain will relate pain to smoking cigarettes
     


  12. Stokely

    Stokely Senior member

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    I've quit. Smoked for a long time. I may when severely drunk with friends bum one. I'm not sure if Chantix has been mentioned. I used for a little while, it at least helped me with the cravings for the first few days. I know there is a lot of varying opinions about the drug. But.....
     


  13. Lagrangian

    Lagrangian Senior member

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    I quit 4 years ago, cold turkey after THE worst hangover I've ever had on January 1st. I'd be lying if I said the urge to smoke doesn't come along sometimes... like, for instance this morning.
    I thought about that for a while and decided that I want to smell the air and the coffee, not the acrid smoke of a cigarette. Once you've been without smokes for a while you learn to control the urge.

    Starting out, parties/nightclubs and most social occasions are the hardest to get through, especially if you're a social smoker.
     


  14. Stedye

    Stedye Senior member

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    My father and Uncle quit cold turkey due to doctors orders for health maintenance. My Uncle quit when he was about fifty eight and he is now eighty- six. My father quit at fifty and lived until the age of 74. I have never smoked but I saw these two do it on the strength of will power. They were both war vets my father was in the Korean War and my Uncle is aWorld War II vet. You can do it with a made up mind!! Give yourself a strong talk in the mirrior each day and you will overcome the addiction.Success to you.
     


  15. Lane

    Lane Senior member

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    Other than the rising cost of cigarettes, I can't imagine a reason to want to quit smoking. The benefits of smoking include:

    1. Makes you look really cool.
    2. Feels really good.
    3. Gets you an "in" with the hot chicks who smoke, who are also 5 times more likely to give oral sex on the first date.

    The negatives regarding health effects are wildly overblown, and anyway the "years" that smoking takes away from you are the shitty ones where you're stuck in a nursing home with nobody to come visit you. I'd rather die a smoker at 55 than live to a healthy 90 unable to wipe my own ass.


    lol moron
     


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