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Edward green stowe, does anyone have a pic?

Phil

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Thanks, I saw those pics, I still cant tell though. It all depends on the angle of the photo it seems. From the comments from the experts on the board though, the 888 is a very elegant last. I think I chose wisely.
 

bengal-stripe

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My French is not well enough to understand the entire site.
To get a (computerized) translation, search souliers.net through google and click on "translate this page". Voilá. All in English.

Go through "files" to "maintenance" and you'll get a very large chunk about antiquing.

But, it's a computer translation; so "glacage" (glazing) is translated as "freezing". But the entry is perfectly understandable (with a smidgen of effort).
 

LabelKing

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I find those computerized translations fairly amusing.

Such as leather is translated as "dead animal fabric" And for some reason shoe trees did not translate.
 

jcusey

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Thanks, I saw those pics, I still cant tell though. It all depends on the angle of the photo it seems. From the comments from the experts on the board though, the 888 is a very elegant last. I think I chose wisely.
I do think that those pictures are a bit misleading. I've never seen an 888 last shoe in the flesh; but I own an 808 last shoe, and the square toe is narrower than it appears in the pictures on that website. Perhaps the gentleman whose shoes those are has wider feet than I do, or perhaps there is just an optical illusion in the pictures. In any case, I'm sure that you'll be very pleased with the model and the last.
 

kabert

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By the way folks, there are some EG Stowe's in size 9-1/2 on EBay right now. Black. Last 89. I've bought RLPL shoes from this seller, marcey2. The ones I got (Long Acre, Last 100E) are beautiful. I paid only $425 plus shipping. Shipped well packaged, etc. Wish these Stowe's were in my size, as I'd snap them up in a second. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....me=WDVW
 

FCS

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How exactly did you do that?
Here is a technique I have used to good effect: 1) As Tony said, most leather does not absorb much polish. You have to use polish that is MUCH darker than the color of the leather you are antiquing. For tan shoes I use a mixture of 60% black shoe cream, 30% red shoe cream and 10% tan shoe cream. I mix it up thoroughly on a paper plate, with a knife. Then I coat the shoes liberally with it. Not a consistent coat over the whole surface of the shoe though. Use your imagination. You will want to accent the high points of the shoe (toe cap, outer heel counter etc.) and put only a light coat over the area where the shoe flexes. If you go crazy there, you will have to do it over (when you wear the shoe for the first time, antiquing over the flex-points turns to ugly.) Let the shoe cream set for a few hours - I let it sit overnight. 2) Use a wax polish to strip the cream back off. I use brown Kiwi polish for tan shoes. Again, this has to be done strategically, as the solvent in the wax will take ALL the cream off very quickly if you are not careful. The idea is to use your imagination, creating a pleasing dark/light contrast. It is best if you study shoes that have already been professionally antiqued first - that way you have a good idea where they should be dark and where they should be light. 3) This is going to sound funny, but after I have coated/stripped the shoes with wax, I wrap them in plastic and pop them in the freezer for half an hour. This does something to the chemical composition of the wax I think. You can raise a much higher shine and it is a much more durable finish. And I've never had any ill effects from it. Â Remove the shoes from the freezer, let them warm back up to room temperature, and then polish with an old silk tie. The results are comparable to Berluti. With tan shoes, I get wonderful and very subtle red and green highlights using this technique. Â A few more things. You are going to want to practice on an old pair of shoes first. If you go at a new pair of Edward Greens first thing, don't come crying to me if you mess them up :) Altough it is hard to ruin shoes this way - you can always strip the finish back and start over. I haven't had the guts to take acetone to my shoes yet, but I'm guessing the results would be even more stunning if you could strip most of the existing polish off. Also, you can do great things with a buffing wheel - this basically burns the leather at the high points, giving it a very dark finish. I did these Edward Green Montford's with the aforementioned process. Before:
 After:
The results were quite dramatic with these shoes, because, while never worn, they were probably originally made 3-4 years ago. The finish had become somewhat dull and the leather was pretty thirsty. If they were fresh from the Edward Green factory, the results would not have been the same unless I had stripped them down first.
Digging up old postings to start learning better polishing techniques. A. Harris, for step no. 1, you should use shoe CREAM, rather than wax, right? And what brands of shoe cream have you been using thus far? As always, many thanks for the info.
 

dorian

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Andrew, I couldn't believe you sold those Montfords after all that work. Hell, I can't believe I missed them on eBay.
 

A Harris

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The Montfords I sold were a smaller size - I still have the pair I antiqued.. They're famous after all
 

alchimiste

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Should there not be something on Souliers on antiquing? I believe it is called "Glacage."
I think that antiquing is patine. Glacage is "make your shoes shine like crazy".
 

alchimiste

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3) This is going to sound funny, but after I have coated/stripped the shoes with wax, I wrap them in plastic and pop them in the freezer for half an hour. This does something to the chemical composition of the wax I think. You can raise a much higher shine and it is a much more durable finish.
Have you ever used your cold polish (for regular polishing, not for antiquing)? On souliers.net somebody uses polishes at different temperatures (www.souliers.net/php/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=42 That is definitely not a chemical effect, rather a change in the viscosity of the polish. Why this makes a different is another story. Mathieu
 

dorian

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What is the difference between the Stowe and the Oundle?  Look very similar.
If I recall correctly, it is the buckle (edit: strap) angle which is the greatest difference. Also, at the heel, there is a tab on the Oundle overlapping from one side to the other; the Stowe has a straight up and down stitch.
 

charle

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Can someone please explain:

1) what are lasts

2) what are lasts' values correlated with

Thanks
 

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