Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Harrydog, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    I have a hard time with 202 vs 82 at certain angles.

    Willow calf is a rare bird. Congrats, they look great. I've been looking for a pair of Dovers on the 202 with Willow for a long time.
     


  2. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    did not know-  r these the 'carter'-   with 3 eyes?

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Look like "ectons" in EG speak.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  3. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    Quote: Bengal

    'It's Norwegian construction. The upper leather is folded to the outside, hence no welt.'


    Okay now I'm confused- did a bit of digging, and have found that not only do people who should know use Norwegian/Goiser interchangeably, but that the welt is optional in Norwegian construction, according to La Botte Chantilly.

    [​IMG]



    'The Norwegian construction type can be made with or without a welt.
    The filling offers great comfort and good resistance. The shoes made according to this process give good support to the foot and show a high level of resistance to humidity.'



    ... and according to Sevan Minasian of 'Classic Shoes for Men':

    Norwegian/Goiser Construction:
    The term "Norwegian" is used promiscuously to refer to several styles of shoe, notably the "Split-Toe Norwegian" with its outward turned moccasin-like apron and joining at the toe, and among Italian shoemakers, of a variety styles with decorative double sewn welts. Unlike in the present shoe, the sewing is mostly non-functional and conceals construction even as rudimentary as Blake Stitching. Very few of those are the true complex Goiser/Norwegian construction, wherin both the split reverse welt and the top leather are turned outward and sewn to the street sole, as shown here.This is the most complex of all shoe construction techniques and very few such shoes are produced in the world.
    The term "Goiser" is derived from Bad Goisern in the Salzkammergut region of Austria. This construction was once commonly found in hand-made all-purpose mountain shoes worn in that region of the Alps and was intended to prevent water from entering through the seams.




    Thx- and totally, the two lasts can look very similar from this angle IMO



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  4. Slewfoot

    Slewfoot Senior member

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    I believe they are are MTO at this point.

    The leather was discontinued as of a few years ago, but I think they found a stash in the back or did a re-issue.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  5. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    +1 EG stopped producing shoes with willow, but AFAIK it's not hard to make- something to do with the 'boarding' of the leather, which is the way the roll it.

    Great news about the stash- I'd like a Dover in Chestnut willow [​IMG]
     


  6. Slewfoot

    Slewfoot Senior member

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    Not sure about Chestnut, but they had Dark Oak Willow last year. My Dovers on the 606 agree with that! :^)
     


  7. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    This is very similar to Bentivegna construction. Actually, some Italians use the term "Tirolese" for goyserer stitching e.g. piergiacomi:
    [​IMG]


    I would question how well norvegese stitching without a welt holds up compared to stitching with a welt, but by all accounts they're fine.
     


  8. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    Hendrix, does the Goiser stitch go with a welt?



    Guys, I found this very interesting explanation of the 'Norweger' style. Looks like it did indeed come from Norway to GB and the States


    In the late 19th century, fishermen and farmers in Aurland and the Sognefjord area in Western Norway were known for making light moccasin style shoes, initially for their own use, but occasionally for sale, which developed into a cottage industry.

    In the second half of the 19th century, there was an influx of upper-class British sports salmon fishermen to the rivers of coastal Norway, particularly western Norway. The salmon season would start in mid-summer, and would last into early autumn. The “salmon lords”, as they were called locally, wanted a light shoe that could easily be slipped on and off during riverside fishing.

    Two villagers, Vebjørn S. Vangen and Andreas S. Vangen, started making and repairing shoes for the British fishermen, until production of the light moccasin became a full-time employment for them.

    Another villager, Nils Tveranger, was the first to start regular production of the model still known in Norway as the ”Aurland shoe”. It was exhibited at the Paris exposition in 1900. The Aurland shoe obtained its present form in the twenties.

    After WWII, production increased greatly, and in the 1950’s around 90 people in the village were employed in shoe production, in 12 different small workshops in the village. This industry dominated the life of the entire village, just on the strength of employment numbers. The present firm called “Aurlandsko” was established in the late forties.

    In the late sixties, a hydro-electric power-plant was built near Aurdal, and most people in the village found better-paid work at the power-plant. The factory presently has six employees. Production, which in the early years was mainly done in private homes and small shops, is today centralized in a modern factory.

    Bass “Weejuns”: In 1876, George Henry Bass created the G.H. Bass shoe company, and in 1910 he introduced the camp “Mocc”, a soft leather moccasin that challenged the hard dress shoes of the day. In 1936 the Bass Shoe Co introduced an adaptation of a Norwegian fishermen moccasin style shoe named “Weejun” combining “Norwegian” and “Injun”. Weejuns are also referred to as penny loafers because of a semi-pocket featured on the vamp, into which a penny can be slipped.

    BTW the Aurland shoe factory is still there in Norway, as a 'museum-factotry' still producing the original Norweger.. http://www.visitflam.com/aurland-shoe-factory/

    Sos about the non-EG discussion, but's interesting.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  9. Westbound

    Westbound Senior member

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    Can any of you guys ID the the below oxfords by EG? I'm thinking Chestnut on the color (?), but which last are they on and what's the style name?

    [​IMG]
     


  10. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    Looks like the Canterbury with medallion. On the 82 perhaps
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  11. Westbound

    Westbound Senior member

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    Sure does. Do you know if the Canterbury comes with the medallion, or was that pair more than likely Made to Order?
     


  12. Pliny

    Pliny Senior member

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    my bad- with the medallion it's the 'Lichfield' and I think it looks terrific on that last, whatever it is

    an Adelaide cap-toe has got to be one of the nicest traditional styles IMO And If it were me I'd get it in a burgundy or dark oak rather than a chestnut. - much more versatile, and on the 82 last rather than the 202, if you're looking for a rounded toe. I find the 202 really hard to match with trousers.




    [​IMG]




    Westbound- the Canterbury ^^ is def on the 82 and looks a lot like your Lichfield no?
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  13. Westbound

    Westbound Senior member

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    I agree. That whole getup is perfect on that last.

    So Lichfield it is (thanks, Pliny), but does anyone know for sure if that's the 82?
     


  14. Westbound

    Westbound Senior member

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    Yea', you're right, but I have way too many shades of dark brown / oak / etc, so I need to branch out a bit. Plus, that color (albeit not the most versatile) is extremely nice. And the toe is beyond perfect. Hope someone chimes in and confirms whether or not it's the 82.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012


  15. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    no. the procedure has been explained to him several times, though.
     


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