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CTBrummie

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Thanks for kicking this off, CT - great history and information. I daresay that the old Lotus' are not a bit poncey.
Further to my earlier posts and @VegTan 's excellent contribution, I carried out a highly scientific (!) experiment today to compare EG's country calf (CC) to proper old school zug, or heather gorse in EG-speak.

Side by side below, a pair of 1940s boots made of Beva leather, a pair of second world war-era Lotus veldtschoen boots made of Martin's zug, and the Galway in almond CC. They've all been treated with Obenauf's LP recently to boost their water-repellancy

(Note that Obenauf's and the like can only do so much with dressier leathers and works a lot better with leathers which have a certain amount of water resistance already.)



I left the boots in direct rain for just a couple of minutes and you can see the beading of the water as it hits the barrier of Obenauf's




I then brought the boots inside for half an hour and then compared things. See how the CC has actually allowed some of the water to soak into the leather whereas the zug still carries the water on top





I know from wearing the CC Galways that they look even wetter when the foot has been creasing the boot in the rain as per this pic taken last year




Compare the relative thickness of the Beva and zug



And the relative thickness of zug and CC, bearing in mind that the CC is a double layer, kinda 'cuffed' if you get my drift




It's clear now why there were the 'Country' and 'Highlander' versions as the latter would have been much more of a field boot than the country calf versions, which by comparison would have looked relatively poncey in themselves...

Bonus pic for the boot historians of the CC41-stamped Beva leather ammo boots

 

sevenfoldtieguy

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I was inquiring about the sale at Edward Green last week, and they sent me a photo of some shoes in my size, The middle one is the Alderley in hazel antique.
Thanks, and welcome to the Forum. What colors are the others?
 

TimH

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Further to my earlier posts and @VegTan 's excellent contribution, I carried out a highly scientific (!) experiment today to compare EG's country calf (CC) to proper old school zug, or heather gorse in EG-speak. Side by side below, a pair of 1940s boots made of Beva leather, a pair of second world war-era Lotus veldtschoen boots made of Martin's zug, and the Galway in almond CC. They've all been treated with Obenauf's LP recently to boost their water-repellancy (Note that Obenauf's and the like can only do so much with dressier leathers and works a lot better with leathers which have a certain amount of water resistance already.) I left the boots in direct rain for just a couple of minutes and you can see the beading of the water as it hits the barrier of Obenauf's I then brought the boots inside for half an hour and then compared things. See how the CC has actually allowed some of the water to soak into the leather whereas the zug still carries the water on top I know from wearing the CC Galways that they look even wetter when the foot has been creasing the boot in the rain as per this pic taken last year Compare the relative thickness of the Beva and zug And the relative thickness of zug and CC, bearing in mind that the CC is a double layer, kinda 'cuffed' if you get my drift It's clear now why there were the 'Country' and 'Highlander' versions as the latter would have been much more of a field boot than the country calf versions, which by comparison would have looked relatively poncey in themselves... Bonus pic for the boot historians of the CC41-stamped Beva leather ammo boots
Great work that man & from Birmingham too!!
 

dddrees

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Very enlightening.

Thanks for taking the time and sharing your results with everybody.
 
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Farhad19620

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Further to my earlier posts and @VegTan 's excellent contribution, I carried out a highly scientific (!) experiment today to compare EG's country calf (CC) to proper old school zug, or heather gorse in EG

Wonderful post, thank you for taking the time and effort . What an enlightenment, really appreciate it.
 

CTBrummie

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CTBrummie,
Wonderful post, now I am even more interests in heather gorse Galway SKM is organizing.
Thanks (to you all), although I'm not optimistic that they will reorder the heather gorse for one run.

If they won't, I'll be thinking about seeing what C&J can do, even though they've ruled out shearling recently. They may well have stocks of zug left, and I know they offer regular gorse calf as a MTO option. Always fancied a gorse calf veldt boot...
 

bespoken pa

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Could be, danite just seems to be the default sole of choice. A bit of an assumption on my part.
 

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