Edward Green Appreciation: Pictures, Info, and Where to Buy

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Harrydog, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. sevenfoldtieguy

    sevenfoldtieguy Senior member

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    ^^ What are the specs on your MTO boot?
     
  2. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    justonemore

    Congratulations on the serious haul of new shoe acquisitions.

    With regard to Edward Green shoes in the three colors you mention, midnight, burnt pine, and dark oak, it is all pretty straight forward.

    Out of the box, I recommend using an ever so slight layer of polish. Apply using a small applicator brush, rag, or chamois/cotton polishing cloth. The idea here is to apply a thin layer of polish as protection against dust, dirt, and the like. Neutral (clear) polish is good, colored polish is fine as well. Once applied evenly on the entire upper, let stand for 5 minutes or more, and then polish and buff using a horsehair brush and polishing cloth. Alternatively, some might subscribe to treating the new leather shoes with a leather conditioner, such as Saphir Renovateur or Bick 4; to this I would say be careful. Because these products are technically leather cleaners, as well as conditioners, they will pull some polish off your new shoes, and can dull the shiny factory finish of new shoes.

    With regard to developing or preserving the original color of the leather shoes through subsequent polishes:

    (1) If you wish to maintain/develop a natural patina on the shoes, while avoiding darkening their factory finish prematurely through polishing, I recommend using neutral color polish on all three (or any) colors. You could also use polish that is slightly lighter in color than the shoes themselves in the general course of polishing. Definitely use a high quality polish made with non hydrocarbon ingredients, such as Saphir. Apply leather conditioner and edge dressing to the appropriate areas of the shoes as needed when the upper is dry and sole edges worn.

    (2) If you want to create a burnished effect through polishing and/or keep the finish dark, or perhaps darken slightly, use color polishes that match the shoe colors. Dark brown for dark oak, medium and/or dark blue (navy) for midnight, and whatever the medium brown equivalent to burnt pine is. Saphir has a color chart that is easy to find online, if you choose to go with that brand, as many of us, EG owners, do.

    I am sure other members will make further detailed recommendations that build on what I have mentioned, or contradict this. Please remember two things before following any advice: (i) different people go for different effects when polishing shoes, e.g. matte polish finish, highly burnished/antiqued finish, high shine in single factory color, (ii) pretty much any coloration or effect achieved with shoe polish (and not dye) can be altered and/or removed with leather cleaner/conditioner. It is also worth mentioning, not all shoes in a single colorway, e.g. dark oak, are exactly the same color; this is also something to take into consideration when selecting how best to maintain or develop the color of your new shoes.

    Best of luck.
     
  3. justonemore

    justonemore Senior member

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    Smoothie1,

    Thanks for the reply. I appreciate you taking the time to go into detail.

    While your suggestion of a medium/dark blue for the Midnight Oundle makes sense, there is also alot of grey in the shoe. Would I need to worry about maintaining this part of the colorization as well?

    My mind first turned to Saphir for these shoes but a respected member on another forum had this to say:

    ''I have found good color matches to various EG's among Meltonian's browns and tans. There are also a couple of Saphir matches as well, but the Saphir is so dense that it covers up most of the variegation in the leather, and that's one of the appealing characteristics of EG's.''

    Has anyone else experienced any problems along these lines?
     
  4. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    Serious haul...all the shoes since I knew there are a number from other makers! Personally I don't take the colors too literally. I typically use neutral lotion and don't use too much paste often (maybe once in a while to add color). For midnight, I use navy or black (or neutral when it gets too dark; the neutral polish tends to pull older waxes up from my experience). For burnt pine, I personally just use neutral since I like to keep the shade. Finally, for dark oak, I use dark brown or black for the ones I want to darken and neutral for those that I want to naturally lighten. No real science for this and there are very few things that you can do to cause REAL damage when it comes to colors (of course there are always extremes here...common sense). Wear the shoes often and you'll have less stress about maintenance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2014
  5. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    I understand the difficulty of matching Edward Green colors like midnight, slate, and cloud to exact polish colors; all of these colors are tricky. I suppose what makes these colors appealing, every pair looks slightly different with unique shading, variegation, and burnishing, is that which makes them tricky.

    You could achieve a closer color match by mixing different colors of polish. Mixing polishes is the only reliable way I have been able to achieve a color match for burnt pine to date, for example. However, for a color like midnight or cloud, why not just use neutral polish? I think just about any color of polish will alter (or cover) the variegation to which you refer. Also, unlike with dark oak or black shoes, if you are unhappy with a polish job, the removal of colored polish using leather cleaner/remover and the reapplication of polish could prove complicated or disastrous.

    Don't over think this! When in doubt reach for clear polish.
     
  6. sevenfoldtieguy

    sevenfoldtieguy Senior member

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    Truer words have never been spoken.
    Also, if using dark brown or black to darken dark oak, make sure it is polish you are using and not shoe cream. In my experience*, using a shoe cream in those colors on dark oak will greatly darken the leather and lead to much streakiness.

    * I experimented on a dark oak pair with John Lobb dark brown shoe cream (don't worry, all the cream came off after a good bit of elbow grease).
     
  7. labravajazz

    labravajazz Senior member

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    Just fwiw I visited Justin the shoe snob one day in London with a pair of slate oxfords Cheaney Imperials - bought fir a song at TK Maxx (!) - he was pleasantly surprised by the quality and likened the leather especially to EG, they are certainly comparable to EG I have. anyway he recommended using blue polish for these shoes.pI haven't tried it yet as they still look great some time after he did his polish job on them.
     
  8. Axelman 17

    Axelman 17 Senior member

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    I am thinking about doing an MTO from Leffot and wanted to see if anyone else wanted in. Already have two Dovers but I think I am going to add a third. Would be on the 606 in coffee suede with HAF soles. I think the Dover is versatile enough that this make-up could be dressed down to wear with Jeans or dressed up to wear with a suit. Any interest?
     
  9. sevenfoldtieguy

    sevenfoldtieguy Senior member

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    I will have to pass, but it sounds good. i do have that exact shoe in nutmeg suede. I wear them casually. They can be worn year round, of course, but they are especially useful in Spring and Summer.
     
  10. luc13

    luc13 Senior member

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    To Day

    [​IMG]
     
  11. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    Yes, Cheaney Imperials are nicely made. I would say they are closer to Grenson's Stuart's Choice when it comes to leather though. My EGs then to have a thickness, yet flexibility to the leather that I don't find in the other brands that I own. Speaking of EG: Clayton Adelaide (for RL) [​IMG]
     
  12. luc13

    luc13 Senior member

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    Wonderful shoes, Sir!
     
  13. Farhad19620

    Farhad19620 Senior member

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    Ver nice, they look more like a pair of G&G!
     
  14. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    Thanks! Now that I look at it, my shoes appear to be the dark oak version of yours.
     
  15. luc13

    luc13 Senior member

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    Unfortunately no G&G:)

    [​IMG]
     

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