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stook1

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Thanks for your kind reply. If burnishing, can't it be removed with acetone? Just curious as I will just leave alone as suggested.
I would be very careful using acetone in this scenario. I dabble in vintage shoe restoration and also hand patina with dyes and such so I have experience using acetone. I think it's a really bad idea to try to address this spot by stripping it with acetone. There is a good chance that you will remove the top layer of the finish on the leather (ie. stripping it) unless you are exceedingly careful and even then it's possible. If that happens, in my opinion, the shoes won't look right unless you strip and refinish both shoes entirely. I'd be pretty reluctant to go down that path on a brand new pair of EGs.

I'd strongly recommend just wearing them and see how that mark evolves over some period of time. It may fade on it's own or just blend into the overall patina of the shoe. Don't use Renovateur anymore and use something like Bick4 instead, which doesn't have any solvents.
 

ducatiti

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I would be very careful using acetone in this scenario. I dabble in vintage shoe restoration and also hand patina with dyes and such so I have experience using acetone. I think it's a really bad idea to try to address this spot by stripping it with acetone. There is a good chance that you will remove the top layer of the finish on the leather (ie. stripping it) unless you are exceedingly careful and even then it's possible. If that happens, in my opinion, the shoes won't look right unless you strip and refinish both shoes entirely. I'd be pretty reluctant to go down that path on a brand new pair of EGs.

I'd strongly recommend just wearing them and see how that mark evolves over some period of time. It may fade on it's own or just blend into the overall patina of the shoe. Don't use Renovateur anymore and use something like Bick4 instead, which doesn't have any solvents.
Well noted and will do as suggested. Besides Reno, I only have VSC. Does VSC have any solvents?
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

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Well noted and will do as suggested. Besides Reno, I only have VSC. Does VSC have any solvents?
If memory serves, it should have solvents. The only other option I can think of that does not contain solvents is Lexol Conditioner, although I have seen it darken leather.
 

stook1

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Well noted and will do as suggested. Besides Reno, I only have VSC. Does VSC have any solvents?
Yah, I am not too sure about the VSC formulation but I've personally never found it to cause this type of issue whereas reports like yours with Renovateur aren't uncommon. VSC can be used for light cleaning and will give a shine as well - it is more of an all in one like Renovateur. I'd assume it has solvents.

I'd just pickup some Bick4, it's good stuff and just a straight conditioner with no cleaning or polishing agents.
 

dukenukem4ever

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Yah, I am not too sure about the VSC formulation but I've personally never found it to cause this type of issue whereas reports like yours with Renovateur aren't uncommon. VSC can be used for light cleaning and will give a shine as well - it is more of an all in one like Renovateur. I'd assume it has solvents.

I'd just pickup some Bick4, it's good stuff and just a straight conditioner with no cleaning or polishing agents.
+1 on the Bick 4 recommendation. Really awesome stuff given its price. I like to buy by the gallon and just refill my smaller 16oz bottle.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

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Ok to use Bick with shell? Found a gallon for $89. Sound about right?
I'd be mindful of using Bick with Shell. Not because anything negative will come of it, but more so because it dulls the leather. Probably mentioned this before with regards to general leather maintenance, but it applies more so to Cordovan. Brushing, water, and possibly a deer polish. bone is probably all you'd require to maintain it and keep it looking good. With brushing, extra brushing, and more brushing to keep it looking good. :-D
 
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BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

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Well noted and will do as suggested. Besides Reno, I only have VSC. Does VSC have any solvents?
Incidentally, if you wanted a different product (although more expensive) that saturates well, smells great, and is 100% biodegradable and non-toxic you should give the Pure Polish conditioner a shot.

This one:


A little goes a long way.
 

George Red

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Incidentally, if you wanted a different product (although more expensive) that saturates well, smells great, and is 100% biodegradable and non-toxic you should give the Pure Polish conditioner a shot.

This one:


A little goes a long way.
+1.
 

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