Eating cheese

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mgm9128, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. culverwood

    culverwood Senior member

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    I do like a little Membrillo with my cheese.
     


  2. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    MM- there's a good discussion on cheese here. Judging freshness: the best rule when beginning is to buy from a trustworthy cheesemonger and let them help you learn. Judging cheese and developing a palate is for it is no different than doing the same for wine, beer, chocolate... comes with experience. Yes, you can mix cheeses by region, similar or contrasting... by milks... however you want to go at it. If you are really interested, I suggest you read Max McCalman's & David Gibbon's "Mastering Cheese" As he outlines (and acknowledges you can turn almost any of this on its head), the basic logic on progressions is typically (my quick examples in parens):
    • Milder to stronger (Evora to eye-watering Cabrales)
    • Younger to older (fresh goat to 10 year cloth-bound cheddar)
    • Simpler to more complex (Campo de Montalbon to Stichelton)
    • Softer to harder (Capriole to Mimolette)
    • All else being equal: goat to sheep to cow (and of course their are blends)
    • natural rind to bloomy rind to washed rind (the latter being the real stinkers)
    • Pasteurized to raw milks
    • Blues always last
    As others point out: eat what you like, try things... buy only what you can eat in a day or two. Then you get to go back and buy and try more, more frequently [​IMG] Point Reyes blue is very nice as Matt says. Also west coast, be sure to try the blues from Rogue Creamery, especially the smoky blue. If you haven't tried blue with honey yet: [​IMG]

    Thanks for this; I was looking for a guideline as far as how a typical progression would go. I'll look out for that book. I go here for all of my cheese. The owner is extremely knowledgable (he's been doing it for 30 years), and gets the absolute best cheese in the state. I've also found what a grand difference getting cheese cut fresh to order makes, rather than precut and prepackaged. If you are ever in the area, it's worth going out of your way for. His olive oil, too, is a special blend from Corsica that he makes himself. You almost want to eat it straight with a spoon. I had some incredible Bavarian blue a few weeks ago in the city. I have a hard time finding it for sale, though. I was eating St. Agur for a while. I haven't tried Point Reyes, but now I'll have to.
     


  3. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I forgot to add- also read their book "The Cheese Plate" - full of examples for plating.

    Drien has a great rep- and absolutely- buying fresh cut is the way to go.
     


  4. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Here is the Shropshire I've been enjoying this week: [​IMG] And this Ticklemore is also very interesting: [​IMG]
     


  5. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    From left to right: Queso del Mano from Haystack Mountain in Colorado. It's a raw goat cheese, and tastes very woodsy; you can almost taste the hay and twigs. The second is an Époisses, which rind is washed in brandy, and has a very deep flavor. Then the last two are my personal favorite hard cheeses, ComtÃ[​IMG] and Gruyère. [​IMG]
     


  6. braised

    braised Senior member

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    Just remember to take your cheese out several hours before and to put it in a not hot area. It makes all the difference.

    I love English blues. My favorite, right now, is Stichelton, but I also like French blues a lot, though what we get here is not as good as what you find over there. Still very good. Point Reyes Blue from my area is quite a nice American blue. I, unlike others, dislike most of the CA cheeses, even Cowgirl, but this is a nice cheese. Try a bunch. A very old fashioned, and wonderful, way to eat blue is on bread with a bit of salted butter. Great combination.


    Matt - Stichelton is good, Colston Basset Stilton is better. Find a big piece and let mature at room temp for a day. Its a dream. By comparison, a good piece of CB Stilton has more moisture than Stichelton. Stichelton is often lauded as old fashioned and hand made in comparison to commercial stiltons. Keller and others use it on their cheese boards and my feeling has always been its for the novelty of the discovery as opposed to the merits of the cheese. True as that may be that Stitchelton is better than commercial stilton, Colston Basset is in a league of its own.

    If you can buy a July or August cheese, its the best because of the summer grass available to the cows. They come available in November and December and make the perfect appearance for Christmas and New Years.

    B
     


  7. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Finding out was, without exaggeration, the most embarrassing moment of my life.

    I doubt that.
     


  8. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    I doubt that.

    More "embarrassing things" have happened I suppose, but I don't embarrass easily, and I have never felt that embarrassed.
     


  9. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    I wouldn't put comte and gruyere on same plate, personally. Actually, I don't think i'd ever add them to a cheese plate. To me, they're best on french onion soup, or as part of an au gratin dish. I never really been a fan of them on their own but i suppose that's personal.

    Also, don't know if it's been mentioned, but aside from mixing hard/soft etc, you might like to have a selection that spans from mild to strong, and you preferably eat them in that order.

    I've eaten fewer cheese plates than some, but epoisse and many blues are very strong, and i'd probably do either/or on a particular plate.
     


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Probably the best cheese I've ever had on a plate was a four year old comte. Don't write them off because most are cooking cheeses.
     


  11. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    More "embarrassing things" have happened I suppose, but I don't embarrass easily, and I have never felt that embarrassed.

    There's one incident i can think of off the top of my head that you SHOULD be embarrassed about. It's definitely a more serious offense then sending matt some bad cheese. [​IMG]
     


  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    There's one incident i can think of off the top of my head that you SHOULD be embarrassed about. It's definitely a more serious offense then sending matt some bad cheese. [​IMG]
    [​IMG] Edit: Oh, I assume you mean the Tina Turner concert. Hell naw man. That was a blast and a great life experience.
     


  13. Mikie

    Mikie New Member

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    I eat cheese with chicken burger and sandwich because it gives delicious taste and i like this because cheese makes good addition.
     


  14. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    +1 on comte, I actually really like a good slice of comte broiled on half an avocado. Sounds weird but try it before you knock it.
     


  15. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Starting from the top, and running clockwise, is Robbiola di Capra from Piedmont--a very nice goat cheese. Then, Stilton blue from Nottinghamshire, Grayson from Virginia (my least favorite on the plate), a 12-month sheep's milk Manchego from La Mancha, and finally a 2-year Comté from Jura, France.

    I didn't really think about regions or varieties, but just went with which cheeses I liked best that I tasted, and thought would combine well together. Essentially, there are two hards, one soft, one semisoft, and a blue, which I feel is a nice balance. The figs and peaches acted as nice palate cleansers, as well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011


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