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Eating cheese

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mgm9128, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. braised

    braised Senior member

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    Just remember to take your cheese out several hours before and to put it in a not hot area. It makes all the difference.

    I love English blues. My favorite, right now, is Stichelton, but I also like French blues a lot, though what we get here is not as good as what you find over there. Still very good. Point Reyes Blue from my area is quite a nice American blue. I, unlike others, dislike most of the CA cheeses, even Cowgirl, but this is a nice cheese. Try a bunch. A very old fashioned, and wonderful, way to eat blue is on bread with a bit of salted butter. Great combination.


    Matt - Stichelton is good, Colston Basset Stilton is better. Find a big piece and let mature at room temp for a day. Its a dream. By comparison, a good piece of CB Stilton has more moisture than Stichelton. Stichelton is often lauded as old fashioned and hand made in comparison to commercial stiltons. Keller and others use it on their cheese boards and my feeling has always been its for the novelty of the discovery as opposed to the merits of the cheese. True as that may be that Stitchelton is better than commercial stilton, Colston Basset is in a league of its own.

    If you can buy a July or August cheese, its the best because of the summer grass available to the cows. They come available in November and December and make the perfect appearance for Christmas and New Years.

    B
     
  2. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Finding out was, without exaggeration, the most embarrassing moment of my life.

    I doubt that.
     
  3. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I doubt that.

    More "embarrassing things" have happened I suppose, but I don't embarrass easily, and I have never felt that embarrassed.
     
  4. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    I wouldn't put comte and gruyere on same plate, personally. Actually, I don't think i'd ever add them to a cheese plate. To me, they're best on french onion soup, or as part of an au gratin dish. I never really been a fan of them on their own but i suppose that's personal.

    Also, don't know if it's been mentioned, but aside from mixing hard/soft etc, you might like to have a selection that spans from mild to strong, and you preferably eat them in that order.

    I've eaten fewer cheese plates than some, but epoisse and many blues are very strong, and i'd probably do either/or on a particular plate.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Probably the best cheese I've ever had on a plate was a four year old comte. Don't write them off because most are cooking cheeses.
     
  6. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    More "embarrassing things" have happened I suppose, but I don't embarrass easily, and I have never felt that embarrassed.

    There's one incident i can think of off the top of my head that you SHOULD be embarrassed about. It's definitely a more serious offense then sending matt some bad cheese. [​IMG]
     
  7. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    There's one incident i can think of off the top of my head that you SHOULD be embarrassed about. It's definitely a more serious offense then sending matt some bad cheese. [​IMG]
    [​IMG] Edit: Oh, I assume you mean the Tina Turner concert. Hell naw man. That was a blast and a great life experience.
     
  8. Mikie

    Mikie New Member

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    I eat cheese with chicken burger and sandwich because it gives delicious taste and i like this because cheese makes good addition.
     
  9. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    +1 on comte, I actually really like a good slice of comte broiled on half an avocado. Sounds weird but try it before you knock it.
     
  10. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Starting from the top, and running clockwise, is Robbiola di Capra from Piedmont--a very nice goat cheese. Then, Stilton blue from Nottinghamshire, Grayson from Virginia (my least favorite on the plate), a 12-month sheep's milk Manchego from La Mancha, and finally a 2-year Comté from Jura, France.

    I didn't really think about regions or varieties, but just went with which cheeses I liked best that I tasted, and thought would combine well together. Essentially, there are two hards, one soft, one semisoft, and a blue, which I feel is a nice balance. The figs and peaches acted as nice palate cleansers, as well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  11. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    I really, really, really enjoy Point Reyes blue. I will try it with the salted butter!
    My question, also -- how the heck can you tell? I once got some Raclette, and I totally couldn't deal. I like durian, but that stuff was....
    Beautiful! I love figs with a cheese plate. I also sometimes like some dried apricots (depending on the selection), and blanched almonds, too. ~ H
     
  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I'm not sure. :laugh: I just know that it was my last weekend in California, and I thought that I should get something nice for Matt b/c of all the things he'd done for me/with me when I was out there. So, all excited as hell, I went to the Cheese Shop in Healdsburg, asked if they had Epoisses, since I knew Matt loved Epoisses, and bought the last of it that they had (probably should have been some kind of a red flag right there). Then, jolly as a clam, I gave it to him, thinking I was a badass and thoughtful and a good friend and all of those nice things. I found out months later that it was past its prime and was never enjoyed. :( Matt was cool about it too, didn't rub my face in it or anything, since I'm sure he thought that it was the thought that counted, but man did my heart sink.
     
  13. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    Want to do a charcuterie and cheese platter for dinner tonight, with some great bread. Problem is, I never know what to buy when I go to a cheese counter. I like pretty much every cheese, from hard and mild to creamy and super pungent. Are there any types/brands/etc. that are ubiquitous enough so I can probably find in my whole foods or other cheese store that would be a good learning experience? Or are there characteristics I should look for (other than just price), that could be a good determinant of quality?

    Just to qualify this, I'm not looking for "try brie" suggestions, but more along the lines of "there is this type of blue cheese that is pretty easy to find that is very good". Or just what's a favorite type of cheese that I probably wouldn't buy that maybe I should try.

    I prefer soft cheeses, but am happy to try hard ones too.
     
  14. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    For blue, I like Fourme d'Ambert, which should be pretty easy to find. I've been eating Stilton, lately, and it is very good, as well. If you can find Shropshire blue, buy it.

    Last week, I had Robiola di Capra for the first time. It very well may be one of my favorite soft cheeses.

    For hard, I'd look for an aged Comté.

    As far as quality goes, try to get your cheese cut fresh, if possible; it makes quite the difference.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  15. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    KJT-

    Are you buying from a cheese-monger or a supermarket?
    If fresh from a cheese-monger, ask them to put something together for you. Tell them what you like and how many people you're feeding. If you have anything that you KNOW will be on the plate, like a certain cured meat, tell him to build around that.

    This cheese-clock might be useful to you http://www.artisanalcheese.com/cheeseclock/


    As to blues- Point Reyes and Rogue Creamery cheeses are common in stores with decent selections. If you are in the Midwest, look for "St. Pete's Select" from Faribault Creamery. Colston-Bassett Stilton and Stichelton are pretty easy to find in better shops.

    Start with a fresh goat's cheese- Cypress Hill is easy to find.

    Have you ever used straight parmigiano or pecorino? Great, tangy, crunchy, crystalline hard cheeses... there are a number of choices... better shops always have a real parm from Emilia Romagna.
     
  16. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    A great alternative to Parmagiano and Pecorino, for eating out of hand, is Pratomagno. It's very similar to a Parmagiano, but is sweeter and much better when eaten straight, in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  17. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    I don't think you can substitute a sheep milk cheese with a cow milk cheese (I guess Pratomagno is one, can't find much information about it.. wanna tell more?), can you? Pecorino can be mild but also very very strong in taste. Buy what you like. I'd go for a young one if you prefer sweeter taste. There are a dozen Pecorinos out there because, as you surely know, it simply means sheep cheese.

    For plating, I've often seen cheese served with dark/brown or fruit bread.
     
  18. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Great advice. IMO, the only hard cheese that compares to good parmesan is Montgomery's Cheddar. Not compares as in similar, but compares as in I like it as much.
     
  19. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    Thanks to all the replies. I was going to just go to the supermarket, but I think I'll make a trip to a well known cheese shop on the other side of town so I can have an actual conversation with someone who knows something. Won't be tonight though.

    This shop actually has their list of cheeses on the website. Anything I should make sure to get? http://www.lafromagerieonline.com/cheeses_meats.html

    This is the other place if anyone wants to know: http://cheesetique.com

    Anyone in the DC area know of any other places that are either in DC or closer to MD?

    Edit: this place has good reviews too http://www.yelp.com/biz/cowgirl-creamery-washington
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  20. mordecai

    mordecai Senior member

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    Cowgirl Creamery cheeses are often good, but a little boring in my opinion.
     

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