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East Sicily Tailors

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by UrbanComposition, May 27, 2016.

  1. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    I don't think it's standard, at least not globally speaking. It may be done by others though. Which makers have done it that way for you, Sprout? Pics?

    Some other ways of doing it:

    Chan, with straight machine stitch:
    [​IMG]

    Luxire, with the fabric edge folded under and then hand stitched:
    [​IMG]

    P. Johnson with looping machine stitch:
    [​IMG]

    @UrbanComposition , if you'd rather we spun this off into another thread, let me know. I'd be interested in seeing your Tailor's Keep pants or those of other tailors, from whomever would like to post them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016


  2. UrbanComposition

    UrbanComposition Distinguished Member

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    I'm going to Tailors Keep this afternoon for the first fitting of the tobacco fresco; I'll post pics from that. Later on I'll grab the fox flannel pents and take a photo of the hem.
     


  3. SimonC

    SimonC Distinguished Member

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    I am highly amused given they are my socks.... :satisfied:
     


  4. UrbanComposition

    UrbanComposition Distinguished Member

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    Stopped by Tailors Keep this afternoon after work, and I have to say, they pretty much nailed my pattern. Here's some quick & dirty iPhone shots:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Forgot to take a pick of the inside cuff to see the stitching but when I pick them up next week (along with the AFB fresco trousers) I'll snap a pic of it. Tobacco jacket should arrive in 2-3 weeks from Palmisciano.
     


  5. sprout2

    sprout2 Distinguished Member

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    The xxx was done by a Silician-American tailor trained in Rome, a Neapolitan tailor, and a Japanese tailor (training location unknown).
    I did see the diagonal handstitch done by the Japanese tailor as well. You made me curious and I checked recent commissions from the latter and I see an overlock stitch -- mailing it in, I guess.
    Maybe xxx is prevalent in southern Italy?
     


  6. sprout2

    sprout2 Distinguished Member

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    Time for me to get new taste in sofas or you to get new taste in socks [​IMG]
     


  7. alexSF

    alexSF Distinguished Member

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    Yes,
    It is considered "rough" by other tailors less inclined to handwork.
    Afaik the standard method is the overlock+machine straight stitching which give a more refined simple look.

    There is also another method where the edge of the fabric is folded becoming invisible, se this example from Celentano (Rome)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016


  8. sprout2

    sprout2 Distinguished Member

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    Ahhh yes the first tailor I mentioned also liked to do that one, now that I recall. It's like a sandwich with a cavity between the two sides sewn together. It requires many small stitches around the circumference of the leg opening, though, and if one of these becomes loose, the actual sides of the cavity open up. Is that a Roman thing? It might explain the connection of the Roman-trained guy I used. But I thought he kept calling it "French" something or other. Maybe that was an affectation like "French fries."
     


  9. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    Very interesting, AlexSF. I'd never seen that before and am having a hard time imagining how it's sewn. I'm guessing it's hand-stitched after it's been folded and pressed into place. Any idea, Alex? @Despos ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016


  10. Despos

    Despos Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    Have used ever technique shown in these pictures.
    The most common and what is used by most alteration shops or tailor shops inside of men's stores is the "loop stitch" which is done with a blind stitch machine. Reason to use this; it is the fastest to do and to remove. When you break one stitch you can unravel the entire line of stitching. You can hem a trouser in seconds rather than minutes of time to finish the work. Does not require any special skills to operate a blind stitch machine. You can train a monkey to do this. Don't use this method because we never purchased a blind stitch machine.

    Hemming trousers has two issues to address. Restrain the raveling of the cut edge of the cloth and secure the fold up of the hem to the trouser leg. Using the XXX stitch covers the edge to contain the raveling and secures the hem to the trouser leg. Another method shown in these pictures is to fold the cut edge of the hem over to have a finished edge. One benefit of doing this is you can leave more outlet for future needs. Don't like the small amount of bulk it adds that might create a ridge from pressing so I don't do this.
    Since the X stitch covers the edge of the hem it secures the hem in a way to keep your toe from snagging the hem and tearing the hem open. This isn't unique to southern Italy, it's done universally, everywhere, anywhere. Exponentially more time consuming than using a blind stitch machine.

    A couple of these pictures show the cut edge finished off or lets say overcast with a serging machine to contain the raveling. The Chan hem was then sewn by machine. I do this depending on the client. When the client would be more upset that the hem came open rather than it was sewn by hand or machine. Some clients don't have time or the inclination to deal with maintenance issues with their clothes and this method is full proof for staying secure.

    The last picture shows the hem hidden by folding it between the cuff and trouser leg. I learned this method during apprenticeship with tailor from Caraceni/Milano. Raveling is a non issue because the hem is concealed. This method requires more time for basting in the preparation stage and then one straight stitch to finish. I like the clean look. I use this when I want to be an "artiste"!
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016


  11. alexSF

    alexSF Distinguished Member

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    It should be a simple slip-stitch after folded and pressed like you said, it's probably the nicer and refined method.

    Anyway, I love to alter my garments by myself and to do the cuffs I use the XXX method too.
    Sometimes I add a zig-zag stitching (I don't have an overlocker but a simple Bernina) to contain the raveling at the edge before doing the handstitiches ("punto mosca" in italian)
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016


  12. kolecho

    kolecho Distinguished Member

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    Here's how my Gennaro Paone pants are finished inside the hem. He told me this method is cleaner than the XxX method. By the way, my HK pants maker use the XxX method.

    [​IMG]
     


  13. UrbanComposition

    UrbanComposition Distinguished Member

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    Got a couple pics from Palmisciano, he'll ship these out in the next day or so:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     


  14. teddieriley

    teddieriley Distinguished Member

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    Wait, you smell that?
    Tasty. Those are niiice.
     


  15. kolecho

    kolecho Distinguished Member

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    Interesting lapel line. Would be keen to see them on UC :slayer:
     


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