Dyeing shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by CBDB, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. CBDB

    CBDB Senior member

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    I want to change a pair of mid brown shoes to a mottled blue/black Lobb Museum effect. My plan is to acetone them, dye them with an aniline blue dye, then over dye with black and use alcohol/bleach to lighten toes and heels. Condition, cream and polish. How hard can it be [​IMG]

    My question for the members of this august forum is what is the best type of aniline dye to use? Tintex? Are there tricks to ensure I get the right finish/effect?

    Any help is appreciated.
     


  2. nmoraitis

    nmoraitis Senior member

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    While I cannot help you with your question, would it be possible to post before and after photos of your shoes? I am always interested in seeing how people make out when changing the colour of their shoes.
     


  3. codymk127

    codymk127 Well-Known Member

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    Just dyed a pair of brown boots yesterday. i just used some black leather dye from the local shoe repair (~$5) and they turned out perfect!
    you might consider just doing that because after just the first coat they were black but had a really cool blue/purple tint to them. They actually looked really cool and i almost didnt do another coat. just an option?
     


  4. HomerJ

    HomerJ Senior member

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    Just dyed a pair of brown boots yesterday. i just used some black leather dye from the local shoe repair (~$5) and they turned out perfect!
    you might consider just doing that because after just the first coat they were black but had a really cool blue/purple tint to them. They actually looked really cool and i almost didnt do another coat. just an option?


    Did you do any stripping before the black dye? Pics?
     


  5. maxnharry

    maxnharry Senior member

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    I stripped a pair of black Edward Green dovers using a bleach solution and then recolored them Navy. I used Fiebing's leather dye.
     


  6. distinctive

    distinctive Senior member

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  7. codymk127

    codymk127 Well-Known Member

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    I didnt do anyting to strip them. also didnt use conditioner. still need to polish them cause they are kind of a dull/matte leather look right now but im not it any rush to do that cause the weather is turning to crap and its raining constantly here. been wearing sneakers lately. anyway, i dont have a camera but ill try to borrow one within the week and get some pics up.
     


  8. gius

    gius Member

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    Do you need to condition them because leather turns very dry after dyeing?
    And why can't you just over-dye them, if you want a blue shoe to be black? Why the need for stripping

    Just curious
     


  9. MiniW

    MiniW Senior member

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    finished leather shoes have some sort of coating that supposedly makes it harder for dyes to take. I've read this before attempting to dye a pair of shoes and heard it again when I went to a shoe repair shop to buy the dye and the man told me to get the stuff to take of the finish. The stuff is called deglazer or acetone. This is the stuff that supposedly dries out the leather, not the dye. Anyways I deglazed the shoes, and when they were still wet, I applied to dye because the color spread more evenly. The shoes went from brown to black fairly easily. After a conditioning with lexol and polish with kiwi, they were ready to wear.
     


  10. Lysol

    Lysol Senior member

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    Bumping an old thread...

    I recently picked up a pair of RL Horatio loafers on sale. I've had my eye on them, in dark brown, for awhile but didn't want to drop the full retail for them as I don't think RL's Italian made shoes are a good value at full price.

    Anyway, I was able to cop a pair of the Horatio loafers in "luggage" at a good price from Grapevine Hill and I want to attempt to dye them a medium-dark brown with a burgundy hue.

    Are there any good websites with tutorials on attempting such a feat or that has more information on the subject? I've seen a lot of good posts on here from people who have dyed shoes but none on HOW to do it.

    For reference, this is the pair of shoes that I would like to dye:

    [​IMG]

    Please, no "take them to your cobbler" replys. I am interested in learning how to do this myself.
     


  11. deathrow1986

    deathrow1986 Well-Known Member

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    I would be very interested to see the results to see them befor i try this myself
     


  12. gius

    gius Member

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    finished leather shoes have some sort of coating that supposedly makes it harder for dyes to take. I've read this before attempting to dye a pair of shoes and heard it again when I went to a shoe repair shop to buy the dye and the man told me to get the stuff to take of the finish. The stuff is called deglazer or acetone. This is the stuff that supposedly dries out the leather, not the dye. Anyways I deglazed the shoes, and when they were still wet, I applied to dye because the color spread more evenly. The shoes went from brown to black fairly easily. After a conditioning with lexol and polish with kiwi, they were ready to wear.
    Thanks for the reply Will definitely keep it in mind for the future. I wonder if this finish placed on the leather can be bought somewhere, or what is the name of it ("glaze"?)? I don't think it would be the same as kiwi polish since I remember reading these polish products wash off in time. Lysol You can try buying a small piece of leather at a fabric shop and then dye that, for experience. I don't use a recipe when I dye wool fabrics (leather can use the same dye as dye for wool since both are "protein" or animal-based fabrics). When I dye wool, I heat water hot enough but not boiling. I use a stainless steel or enamel coated pot. Iron pots will affect the dye. I add in the dye solution little by little and waiting in between to see if I have got the shade I want. You also add vinegar... I've never used a recipe, if the wool was not taking the dye, I would add more vinegar or I would wait longer (generally 30 min for every addition).
     


  13. sl33p3rs

    sl33p3rs Well-Known Member

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    never tried to dye shoes before and curious what it would look like.[​IMG] [​IMG]
     


  14. babygreenspots

    babygreenspots Senior member

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    Have any of you attempted more ridiculous colors like pink or light blue?
     


  15. heard546

    heard546 Senior member

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    I just completed dying a pair See Link.

    Bumping to include my post and details

    After readings Steven's and Ron's threads on their antiquing project I decided to take on my on adventure. The shoes are a pair of hand made Bettaccini in peanut butter brown I recently had up for sale, but decided to experiment on them after being motivated by the other forum members. Below are pictures of the first original shoes without an work done on them other than a shine.

    Before
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After deglazing using Angelus Leather Cleaner & Deglazer
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    First Application of Angelus Medium Brown B Leather Finisher (Total 2 Applications)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Applied 2 Applications of Lexol
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    Applied Kiwi Tan Shoe Polish (Total 2 Applications) and Kiwi Cordovan Shoe Polish (Total 1 Applications) for a dark tone of brown[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I didn't use shoe cream because I couldn't find any store that carried this product near my home.


    I welcome your feedback, and opinions. Take into consideration that this is my first attempt, and will probably attempt
    this task again on a pair of tyran rose loafers I have in storage.

    I will provide lessons learned and additional insights later. A storm is coming, and I have venture out to get dinner for the family.


    -tony

    Bumping an old thread...

    I recently picked up a pair of RL Horatio loafers on sale. I've had my eye on them, in dark brown, for awhile but didn't want to drop the full retail for them as I don't think RL's Italian made shoes are a good value at full price.

    Anyway, I was able to cop a pair of the Horatio loafers in "luggage" at a good price from Grapevine Hill and I want to attempt to dye them a medium-dark brown with a burgundy hue.

    Are there any good websites with tutorials on attempting such a feat or that has more information on the subject? I've seen a lot of good posts on here from people who have dyed shoes but none on HOW to do it.

    For reference, this is the pair of shoes that I would like to dye:

    [​IMG]

    Please, no "take them to your cobbler" replys. I am interested in learning how to do this myself.
     


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