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Dry Ice Martinis?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Spencer Young, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. Spencer Young

    Spencer Young Senior member

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    Chicago
    I was reading an article in my local foodie mag/newspaper, and they mentioned that this highly regarded restaurant in St. Louis puts a bit of dry ice in their martinis (http://www.saucemagazine.com/article/3). All martinis except for those with cream get a drop of dry ice.

    Being curious, I want to try this. Have any of you ever been/made cocktails with dry ice? I'm certain I *don't* want to put the ice in the shaker, as it could (would?) explode when I shake the drink. Once poured, how much is necessary? Is this even necessary? Do I need any ice in the shaker at all, or is that the point of the dry ice?

    I'm moving next weekend, so once I'm all situated I'll be sure to try this out and let you all know how it goes.
     
  2. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    Bay Area

    Being curious, I want to try this. Have any of you ever been/made cocktails with dry ice?


    Only on Halloween, when its in the "punch" bowl.
     
  3. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    It sounds rather gimmicky.
     
  4. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    Location:
    SoCal
    Being curious, I want to try this. Have any of you ever been/made cocktails with dry ice? I'm certain I *don't* want to put the ice in the shaker, as it could (would?) explode when I shake the drink. Once poured, how much is necessary? Is this even necessary? Do I need any ice in the shaker at all, or is that the point of the dry ice?
    This seems gimmicky, but it works on the principle that, for cocktails, colder=better, which is generally true. I had several friends who swore by dry-iced vodka, and who dry-iced their gin before mixing their martinis. I'm not a vodka person, but the martinis were *very* nice and crisp.

    But I don't think dry ice is necessary, as you can get a cocktail to around 24 F with regular ice alone. If you try dry ice, though, I think you would still want to mix with regular ice--the slight dilution of the alcohol that occurs as the ice melts is essential to a good cocktail--then add the dry ice to further reduce the temperature of the finished drink. Also, bartending canon holds that you stir a martini: shaking introduces bubbles, which creates a cloudy drink, and some afficianados believe that shaking "bruises" the gin. I can't taste the difference, but I like a nice, sleek, crystal-clear martini (or--with increasing frequency--an aviation), so I stir.
     
  5. Edward Appleby

    Edward Appleby Senior member

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    It seems to me the primary advantage would be the ability to control exactly how diluted you made the drink.
     
  6. sygyzy

    sygyzy Senior member

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    This seems gimmicky, but it works on the principle that, for cocktails, colder=better, which is generally true. I had several friends who swore by dry-iced vodka, and who dry-iced their gin before mixing their martinis. I'm not a vodka person, but the martinis were *very* nice and crisp.

    But I don't think dry ice is necessary, as you can get a cocktail to around 24 F with regular ice alone. If you try dry ice, though, I think you would still want to mix with regular ice--the slight dilution of the alcohol that occurs as the ice melts is essential to a good cocktail--then add the dry ice to further reduce the temperature of the finished drink. Also, bartending canon holds that you stir a martini: shaking introduces bubbles, which creates a cloudy drink, and some afficianados believe that shaking "bruises" the gin. I can't taste the difference, but I like a nice, sleek, crystal-clear martini (or--with increasing frequency--an aviation), so I stir.


    The mistake that most bartenders make is dilution. Martinis should be clear, not cloudy. That's why the dry ice concept is a good one. You don't *want* water in your drink.
     
  7. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    I have, occasionally, consumed a smoking glass of coke. An important consideration is not getting any scrap that might have fallen off in your mouth. That would be bad.

    Regards,
    Huntsman
     
  8. vesper

    vesper New Member

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    Feb 27, 2010
    Dry ice should be put in at the end. And make sure no one eats any because it will burn them badly! As far as regular ice in the drink goes, I had to replace the refrigerator for my bar and i got one with a Refrigerator Water Filter which has significantly improved he quality of my drinks! My neighbors now come over to borrow ice [​IMG]
     
  9. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Senior member

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    Ouray, CO
    I'm not a vodka person, but the martinis were *very* nice and crisp.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Bartolo

    Bartolo Senior member

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    Boston Area
    The mistake that most bartenders make is dilution. Martinis should be clear, not cloudy. That's why the dry ice concept is a good one. You don't *want* water in your drink.
    The mistake many people who don't understand cocktails make is that they think water is bad. Water is an essential ingredient. If you don't use the proper sized ice in the proper way, you end up with either too much water or too little water. Neither is right. If you put your gin and/or vodka and vermouth in the freezer and make an iceless martini and enjoy it, good for you, but it's not a proper martini. Most of us would not enjoy drinking a martini that is that "hot" (alcholic). Similarly if you stir the gin and/or vodka with crushed ice, you'll have way too much water and it won't be right either. The role of ice in cocktails is essential to getting a good drink. I'm not sure what would make a martini cloudy other than making it wrong, such as shaking the hell out of it rather than stirring it. EDIT: This award-winning bartender explains it better than I can:
     
  11. Mark from Plano

    Mark from Plano Senior member

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    It sounds rather gimmicky.
    I saw it for the first time at a rather gimmicky place here in Dallas this weekend.
     
  12. jiratic

    jiratic Senior member

    Messages:
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    Aug 29, 2009
    [​IMG]

    churchhill would rise from the grave.
    vodka and martini si an ABOMINATION upon the creator.
    Vodka is for girly drinks.
    Gin/Rum/Whiskey is for MEN.
     
  13. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    + [​IMG]
     
  14. CaesarSTL

    CaesarSTL Senior member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Location:
    Paris, France
    This seems gimmicky, but it works on the principle that, for cocktails, colder=better, which is generally true. I had several friends who swore by dry-iced vodka, and who dry-iced their gin before mixing their martinis. I'm not a vodka person, but the martinis were *very* nice and crisp. But I don't think dry ice is necessary, as you can get a cocktail to around 24 F with regular ice alone. If you try dry ice, though, I think you would still want to mix with regular ice--the slight dilution of the alcohol that occurs as the ice melts is essential to a good cocktail--then add the dry ice to further reduce the temperature of the finished drink. Also, bartending canon holds that you stir a martini: shaking introduces bubbles, which creates a cloudy drink, and some afficianados believe that shaking "bruises" the gin. I can't taste the difference, but I like a nice, sleek, crystal-clear martini (or--with increasing frequency--an aviation), so I stir.

    [​IMG]

    churchhill would rise from the grave.
    vodka and martini si an ABOMINATION upon the creator.
    Vodka is for girly drinks.
    Gin/Rum/Whiskey is for MEN.


    Lol, came to support Tyto since reading isn't the easiest skill to master for some... [​IMG]
     

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