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Dry Cleaning Problem

NAVA23

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How do you handle "over" pressing of garments? I'm referring specially to trousers where the dry cleaner steam presses with such pressure that the marks under the hem form an imprint. Has anyone else encountered this problem?
 

westinghouse

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That usually happens to low quality trousers.

Which brand do you have?
 

NewYorkIslander

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My shirts go to one place, and my pants go to another. You have to see what certain dry cleaners do better than others by experience and convenience. I clean my shirts after each wear, but wool pants and jackets get hung, brushed and only dry cleaned when needed (once a year-depending on use).
 

stubloom

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I would respectfully disagree with westinghouse. Seam impressions have very little to do with the quality of the garment and everything to do with the MACHINE PRESSING of the garment: way too much steam, at way too high a pressure, for way too long. Machine pressing transforms your fine wool trousers from 3D to 2D. It's the dry cleaning equivalent of assault and battery. Ordinary dry cleaners are only interested in one thing: how many garments they can push through their "production system" in the shortest possible time at the lowest possible cost per unit. At an ordinary dry cleaner that means 30 to 40 trousers per hour from a relatively unskilled presser. And the only way they can achieve those quantities is by MACHINE PRESSING your trousers (and all other garments) and paying relatively low wages. By contrast, a true quality cleaner will HAND PRESS your wool trousers and will be lucky to get 10 or 12 wool trousers per hour out of a highly skilled presser (less if those trousers are cotton or linen). Bottom line? You get what you pay for. For more information on the subject of machine pressing vs hand pressing, please read.... Blog post: Researchers discover cause of and cure for SSS http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...e-for-sss.aspx
 

k4lnamja

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Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger
My shirts go to one place, and my pants go to another. You have to see what certain dry cleaners do better than others by experience and convenience. I clean my shirts after each wear, but wool pants and jackets get hung, brushed and only dry cleaned when needed (once a year-depending on use).

Hi NYR

what do you mean when you say brushed? I've read many times a member will say they brush their suit but with what and what purpose?

Cheers
 

NewYorkIslander

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Originally Posted by k4lnamja
Hi NYR

what do you mean when you say brushed? I've read many times a member will say they brush their suit but with what and what purpose?

Cheers


Well, I have a Kent Clothes Brush (got from eBay for like $10) and I literally brush my pants and jackets after each wear, and hang them out (not outside, but I always hang them on the outside of my closet, before another quick brush) for 24 hours before they go back in.

What it does is it gets any dirt/dust out of the garment so it doesn't need to be cleaned as often. Remember that the more you put your clothes through the cleaners, they faster they break down.

Its also important to use a cleaners for your good stuff that changes its fluids often. Most places rarely if ever change the chemicals they use to dry clean. The place I go to for that is all the way on Staten Island, and very expensive, but its worth it, because I know they change fluids every week or so, and take great care of the clothes.
 

stubloom

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Response to NewYorkRanger: 1. Only POOR dry cleaning and/or POOR pressing will reduce the longevity of your fine garments. 2. Dry cleaners don't change their dry cleaning solvent often. They occasionally supplement their dry cleaning solvent with virgin solvent when the solvent level necessary for "good" cleaning drops below certain levels. What every dry cleaner should be doing is purifying (or distilling) their solvent AFTER EACH AND EVERY LOAD. Not once a day, not once or twice a week, but AFTER EACH AND EVERY LOAD. CONTINUOUS PURIFICATION or DISTILLATION is the only way a dry cleaner can keep his solvent absolutely pure and as clear as bottled water. CONTINUOUS PURIFICATION is also your ONLY guarantee against grayish whites and, in some cases, faded dark colors. For more information on the subject of purification, please see... Blog post: My dry cleaned garments smell of dry cleaning solvent! Why? http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...vent!-why.aspx
 

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