Dry-aging beef at home

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by DNW, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    I started to wonder about this today as dry-aged beef is not widely available in supermarkets. If they were, they're in the neighborhood of $25-40/lb. Frankly, I can't eat that all the time on a student's budget. So, I've looked online and found this guide:
    This site also contains pretty useful information about meats. A good article on dry-aging here. So, have you try to dry-age your own beef at home?
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    I've watched Alton dry-age beef on his show, but I'm far too impatient to do it myself. I can plan 3,4 hours ahead, maybe, but that does nothing as far as aging beef.
     
  3. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    I've dry-aged standing rib roasts and other primals according to Alton's recommendations (paper towels and plastic bins), but for no more than 3-4 days; time and fridge space become issues. It seemed to work pretty well: I get around 1/2 lb to 1 lb of moisture loss from 10-13 lb cuts, and the meat is noticeably darker.
     
  4. iamaloser

    iamaloser Senior member

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    I'm currently reading The River Cottage Meat Book, which I think every cook should read, and I'm lucky enough to have several "gourmet" grocers around that have good meat. I can understand not wanting to pay for it though. Do the Alton Brown technique, check every day for spoilage, and since you have to age with a giant chunk of meat you can trim off the grody bits if it takes a nosedive. I don't see the point in aging beef unless you have the best, and you might want to shop around, because there is probably a local butcher that can do this for you. Do you live in a huge college town, or is it some small isolated area? Even if it's in the middle of nowhere, it might have a farmer's market. Keep in mind I'm a moron, and everything I say is likely to be criticized by someone whose knowledge in the field of butchery expands beyond that of someone who read one book on the subject.
     

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