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Dressmakers in NYC

chorse123

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Has anyone had experience with dressmakers in NYC? I am considering having a dress made as a gift for my wife, and am looking for any personal experiences. There are a few decent rundowns on-line, but any advice would be greatly appreciated. Now if only she'd get me a suit in return
 

amirrorcrackd

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I have no experience with any, but I see them now and then. There is one on Ave. A between 6th and 7th I believe called Blue that always seems busy. Then there are a bunch along 7th St. and 8th St. Anywhere between 1st and 3rd Avenues. Any other neighborhoods, and I have no idea.

Dan
 

Alexander Kabbaz

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The best dressmakers in NYC are:
Rosemarie Roussel 700 Madison Ave. 212-421-8477 (may not want to do anything but bridal
Sylvia Heisel 131 Thompson Street, 646-654-6768
Lee Anderson 23 East 67th Street, 212-772-2463
Shannon McLean Cose Belle, 7 East 81st Street, 212-988-4210

You should also be able to get other private dressmaker recommendations from the managers at Yumi Katsura and Vera Wang; both are bridal boutiques on Madison Ave and the Bra Smythe, a lingerie shop also on Madison.
 

Shirtmaven

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My friend Rosie Runs a costume shop.
Studio Rouge 152 West 25th St. 7th Fl
212 989-8363
She makes beautiful things for many Broadway show. She is not inexpensive but will do any sort of style you could imagine.
Please mention my name if you do contact her.

You would have to buy your own fabric in the Garment district.
Rosen and Chadick, B & J, PAron, Poli, and NY Elegant are the better stores in that neighborhood.
Carl
 

Fabienne

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Has anyone had experience with dressmakers in NYC? I am considering having a dress made as a gift for my wife, and am looking for any personal experiences. There are a few decent rundowns on-line, but any advice would be greatly appreciated. Now if only she'd get me a suit in return
And on the subject of nice husbands who had a garment made for their wife: the bespoke pants I received as a gift from my husband has the flap covering the zipper placed so it is open on the left side, whereas I think most of my pants have it on the right side. Â I believe the tailor he used specializes on men's clothes. Â Is this a difference between men's and women's garments, like buttons ? Â If so, where does it stem from?
 

FIHTies

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And on the subject of nice husbands who had a garment made for their wife: the bespoke pants I received as a gift from my husband has the flap covering the zipper placed so it is open on the left side, whereas I think most of my pants have it on the right side.  I believe the tailor he used specializes on men's clothes.  Is this a difference between men's and women's garments, like buttons ?  If so, where does it stem from?
What I had heard regarding button is that Ladies garments being more difficult to adorn were dressed by servants and consequently a right handed person was able to manipulate the button through the whole by using their more dextrous hand.

Nowadays that reason doesnt exist anymore and neither would it be true with regard to a zipper so I Imagine that its been taken from the original idea.

Was it a full bespoke pant? Or did he copy a pair of pants from another ant? Why didnt he notice the difference in zippers?

JJF
 

Fabienne

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Interesting explanation. Weren't men also similarly dressed by servants, though?

My husband inspired himself on a pair I have, since it was a surprise, but he picked a totally different fabric (wool brownish-red herringbone), the zipper is now in front, and he made other subtle choices. They fit perfectly. I was shocked. I'm wearing them today and smiling inside at my husband's ingenuity.
 

FIHTies

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Interesting explanation. Â Weren't men also similarly dressed by servants, though?
Googled this now... http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20031205.html Friday December 5, 2003 Previous | Next Dear Yahoo.: Why do men and women's shirts button on different sides? Jani Richmond, Virginia Dear Jani: While we didn't manage to isolate a definitive answer for this question, we learned plenty about the tricky relationship between exigency and style. For example, this lengthy article on button conventions suggests that in the 19th century, well-heeled Victorian women generally didn't dress themselves, so their buttons were designed to be handled by right-handed servants. Although wealthy men may have had servants to lay out their clothes, they generally dressed themselves, and so the buttons on the right side of men's garments made more sense. A Yahoo. Search on "button history" also led us to Benjamin "Good Advice Is Timeless." Dover of the Dallas Morning News. Mr. Dover notes that the first button jackets for men were modeled after the latching designs of armor, which were designed to stop a right-handed opponent from jamming a pike through the seam. He also suggests that the left-side buttons on women's clothes may have been intended to facilitate nursing an infant on the side closest to the woman's heart. Jeff Elder of the Charlotte Observer (who has one of the greatest byline photos we've ever witnessed) suggests that men's coats were designed to make it easier for them to unbutton their coats with their left hand while drawing their swords with their right. In general, we gleaned that European men tended to take their plumage cues from the military, while women's clothing arose out of domestic concerns. For more facts about couture and where it came from, check out the Fashion History category in the Yahoo. Directory.
 

Fabienne

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He also suggests that the left-side buttons on women's clothes may have been intended to facilitate nursing an infant on the side closest to the woman's heart.
Fascinating. And it all makes sense, except the one I quoted above. For obvious reasons, one nurses on both sides.
 

FIHTies

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(FIHTies @ 06 Jan. 2005, 11:08) He also suggests that the left-side buttons on women's clothes may have been intended to facilitate nursing an infant on the side closest to the woman's heart.
Fascinating. Â And it all makes sense, except the one I quoted above. Â For obvious reasons, one nurses on both sides.
Yes, with 5 kids at home who have all been nursed I did think that "analysis" of the buttons was probably listed by a clueless person with no knowledge on the matter. JJF
 

tiger02

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I always figured the buttons were swapped so that fashion-conscious women could button up their slobbish men. The analogy to the zipper fly works rather nicely as well...
Tom
 

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