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Dress for a 'fine" dining experience in America

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kennethpollock, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. kitonbrioni

    kitonbrioni Senior member

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    Note that the NYT does article on guess what place to eat?
    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/19/di...gewanted=print
    The New York Times
    Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By

    July 19, 2006
    The Chef: Anne Quatrano
    Peaches and Ice Milk: A Marriage Made in Georgia
    By KIM SEVERSON

    CARTERSVILLE, Ga.

    IF you're a sous-chef, having a boss with a farm is not always such a great thing.

    Anne Quatrano and her husband, Clifford Harrison, live on 60 acres about an hour's drive from their three Atlanta restaurants. They've got chickens, turkeys and goats. They've got a few random head of cattle and two pigs. They've got herb beds and pea vines.

    And they've got peach trees. Dozens of peach trees. The fruit grows on trees that shade the modern farmhouse she designed, and stretch out over her family property.

    "They aren't pretty, but they're delicious," Ms. Quatrano said of the fruit they bear.

    The peaches from their trees come in three waves, the early clings in late June, then a crop of white peaches and, closer to August, the peaches the chef likes best.

    Last year, the trees were so prolific that Mr. Harrison filled the bed of his pickup truck with a few thousand pounds of fruit and drove it to Bacchanalia, their first restaurant and the flagship of a mini-empire that includes the Floataway CafÃ[​IMG], Quinones at Bacchanalia and the specialty food store, Star Provisions.

    "The chefs just dropped their jaws," Mr. Harrison said. The cooks canned, froze and juiced peaches until the truck was empty.

    Here in New York, lovers of stone fruit can only dream of such a bounty. But Northeast peaches are starting to show up at farm stands, and Ms. Quatrano suggests putting them to good use in a simple dessert.

    Like any self-respecting Atlanta chef, she has a solid repertoire of peach desserts. A favorite is based on a simple maceration of lemon juice and sugar.

    The process gives a little assist to fruit that isn't quite ripe or is slightly flawed. Ms. Quatrano reminds people that if they buy peaches that are not yet ripe the fruit will soften (but will not technically ripen more) if left at room temperature for a day or so. But if the peaches are fragrant and ripe, the sugar-lemon bath in this recipe can be skipped, she said.

    Don't store peaches piled in a bowl. They are delicate and need to be left in a single layer to prevent bruising.

    For the rest of the dessert, Ms. Quatrano browns rounds of brioche, although a fresh biscuit will work. Then she carefully steeps dried chamomile blossoms "” just like the kind one might make a cup of tea with "” in hot, sweetened milk for about 20 minutes.

    She turns the scented milk into ice milk, which marries the peaches to the brioche. Ms. Quatrano likes how the chamomile brings out the honey notes in the peaches and gives them a fuller flavor.

    The ice milk itself is a surprisingly refreshing contrast to the heavy, custard-based ice creams coming out of many a chef's ice-cream maker lately. The only drawback, and it's a small one, is that it can crystallize when left in the freezer.

    Fresh from the machine, though, the ice milk has plenty of sweet dairy notes and a creamy texture.

    "Why bother making a custard?" Ms. Quatrano said. "I understand the richness thing, but the lightness of an ice milk is much more appealing in the summer."

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  2. Comolli

    Comolli Member

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    Good friends:
    I have dined with The Great Pollock at Bacchanalia quite often in the past, primarily over lunch, and even at the lunch hour you find many businessmen shedding ties and attending dishabille. Over the Christmas holidays a friend and I had dinner at Bacchanalia, and she and I were the only ones there who were decently dressed. Of course, she would never have dinner with me there if I were not appropriately dressed, with coat and tie, as that is what she expects of men who take her out.
    This thing about the "California" look is a bit of a mystery to me as I have learned from long experience around women, that men dress largely to please their wives and girlfriends. Most men resist this as they seem to want to dress like their fathers who dressed as their class required. I think women have latched on to the California look because they think it makes their men look sexy, desirable, and they get this from what they see in the grunge magazines. It's too bad George Fraser is not living at this hour.
    This brings to mind a recent visit to Brooks Brothers in Atlanta. As is well-known, women account for by far the greater amount of sales at Brooks Bros. , and they make decisions and buy for their sons and husbands. My salesman friend was busy putting together the ensemble for the groomsmen of a wedding, and the bride to be was in the store selecting each element of the ensemble: blazer, white ducks, shirt, tie and shoes.
    I find this instructive. I have a hunch that it's the women, who are supposed to be the moral and ethical guardians of our youth, who have gone over the edge with this hip thing and certainly started or furthered the decline of Western Civilization.
    Anyway, that seems to me to be the burden of the argument of The Great Pollock.
     
  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Wow, did you really just say that most men desire to dress like their fathers?

    Not even really sure what to say to that.
     
  4. Mr. Checks

    Mr. Checks Senior member

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    Good friends:
    I have dined with The Great Pollock at Bacchanalia quite often in the past, primarily over lunch, and even at the lunch hour you find many businessmen shedding ties and attending dishabille. Over the Christmas holidays a friend and I had dinner at Bacchanalia, and she and I were the only ones there who were decently dressed. Of course, she would never have dinner with me there if I were not appropriately dressed, with coat and tie, as that is what she expects of men who take her out.
    This thing about the "California" look is a bit of a mystery to me as I have learned from long experience around women, that men dress largely to please their wives and girlfriends. Most men resist this as they seem to want to dress like their fathers who dressed as their class required. I think women have latched on to the California look because they think it makes their men look sexy, desirable, and they get this from what they see in the grunge magazines. It's too bad George Fraser is not living at this hour.
    This brings to mind a recent visit to Brooks Brothers in Atlanta. As is well-known, women account for by far the greater amount of sales at Brooks Bros. , and they make decisions and buy for their sons and husbands. My salesman friend was busy putting together the ensemble for the groomsmen of a wedding, and the bride to be was in the store selecting each element of the ensemble: blazer, white ducks, shirt, tie and shoes.
    I find this instructive. I have a hunch that it's the women, who are supposed to be the moral and ethical guardians of our youth, who have gone over the edge with this hip thing and certainly started or furthered the decline of Western Civilization.
    Anyway, that seems to me to be the burden of the argument of The Great Pollock.


    At my local BB, I see five men for every woman, so I'd be shocked if that store sells more to women.
     
  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    At my local BB, I see five men for every woman, so I'd be shocked if that store sells more to women.

    Ditto. I rarely see a woman shopping at BB in SCP, and if they are, they're buying something for themselves (although hopefully not one of those hideous necktie belts)
     
  6. kennethpollock

    kennethpollock Senior member

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    Ditto. I rarely see a woman shopping at BB in SCP, and if they are, they're buying something for themselves (although hopefully not one of those hideous necktie belts)

    I am not sure about BB, but I understand that women buy, or assist in the buying of more than 70% of the men's shirts sold. When I sold clothes in the 1960's I always hated it when a female came in with a guy to buy a suit for him. Men wanted to buy something and get it over with; women had to "shop."
     
  7. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    I find it interesting that KPs dining partners seem to pop up and support him at the most convenient times. In both this thread and the previous one on the diners Bill of Rights.

    K
     
  8. stach

    stach Senior member

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    Yes I was thinking the same thing.
     
  9. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    I find it interesting that KPs dining partners seem to pop up and support him at the most convenient times. In both this thread and the previous one on the diners Bill of Rights.

    K


    yea, and considering many of his generation have a phobia of computers, I really, really doubt that this is all on the level.

    THis is one whacked out lawyer.
     
  10. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Senior member

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    I am not sure about BB, but I understand that women buy, or assist in the buying of more than 70% of the men's shirts sold. When I sold clothes in the 1960's I always hated it when a female came in with a guy to buy a suit for him. Men wanted to buy something and get it over with; women had to "shop."

    I agree that this is a dismal tendency. Any self-respecting man should nip this in the bud with his SO.

    I once had a girlfriend who was an inveterate shopper but never liked anything. If I suggested that she'd look good with something or other, she could come up with an endless list of reasons it would look lousy on her -- not that she dressed particularly well. She would also attempt to dress me in her constant campaign to change me into someone I was not.

    She once observed, "You never buy anything unless you really, really want it, do you?"
    I replied, "I never buy anything unless I need it."

    That may have been the shortest discussion we ever had.
     
  11. tiger02

    tiger02 Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Explain me how you use cufflinks with a short sleeves shirt...

    It's a Jantzen specialty.
     
  12. aybojs

    aybojs Senior member

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    I find it interesting that KPs dining partners seem to pop up and support him at the most convenient times. In both this thread and the previous one on the diners Bill of Rights.

    K


    Like the others coming out of the woodwork, I share your suspicions. A quick profile history check shows that while Comolli has been a registered user for over 2 years, he's only made 15 posts in that time, nearly all of which have been unprompted apologies for arguments by Mr. Pollock, often made in a fawning tone. While Google shows that there is a real-life Mr. Comolli working as a high level Atlanta-area lawyer, it also shows almost no results for the name except a findlaw profile and a few AskAndy/SF posts, which would be unusual for an experienced participant in online communities, particularly one fond of using his real name in them.
     
  13. kennethpollock

    kennethpollock Senior member

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    Like the others coming out of the woodwork, I share your suspicions. A quick profile history check shows that while Comolli has been a registered user for over 2 years, he's only made 15 posts in that time, nearly all of which have been unprompted apologies for arguments by Mr. Pollock, often made in a fawning tone. While Google shows that there is a real-life Mr. Comolli working as a high level Atlanta-area lawyer, it also shows almost no results for the name except a findlaw profile and a few AskAndy/SF posts, which would be unusual for an experienced participant in online communities, particularly one fond of using his real name in them.

    You got me. I admit it. I am also Comolli, Fabienne, Jerrysfriend and E*****t (banned).
     
  14. kennethpollock

    kennethpollock Senior member

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    E*****t's comments on reading this thread:

    "The sommelier was surprised by my silver plated French wicker wine basket, but pleasantly so

    "I assume he was shocked to see that you spend $250 in food while you but can not even afford a sterling silver one !!!!

    "He must have thought you were a redneck, temping in a fast food and trying to impress a girl you met the day before in a lap dancing bar !!!!!!!!"
     
  15. kennethpollock

    kennethpollock Senior member

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  16. RJman

    RJman Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    E*****t's comments on reading this thread:

    "The sommelier was surprised by my silver plated French wicker wine basket, but pleasantly so

    "I assume he was shocked to see that you spend $250 in food while you but can not even afford a sterling silver one !!!!

    "He must have thought you were a redneck, temping in a fast food and trying to impress a girl you met the day before in a lap dancing bar !!!!!!!!"

    Like your friend Mr Springer, you do seem to like controversy as well as collecting freaks. Jerry has his incestuous trailer trash, you have ernest. It's really too bad he's not back on, except that recently he seemed to be going nuts with the polls. Can't you give him a job or something? Still, ernest knows what side his tartine Poulain [sic] is buttered on, and to sing for his supper.
     
  17. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Like your friend Mr Springer, you do seem to like controversy as well as collecting freaks. Jerry has his incestuous trailer trash, you have ernest. It's really too bad he's not back on, except that recently he seemed to be going nuts with the polls. Can't you give him a job or something? Still, ernest knows what side his tartine Poulain [sic] is buttered on, and to sing for his supper.

    He must like it the lamb.
     
  18. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    I have a hunch that it's the women, who are supposed to be the moral and ethical guardians of our youth, who have gone over the edge with this hip thing and certainly started or furthered the decline of Western Civilization.

    A bit dramatic, aren't we? Time changes, and I suggest you try to keep up before giving yourself a heart attack because of "the decline of Western Civilization."
     
  19. Comolli

    Comolli Member

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    Thank you for your note. Hyperbole is a common tactic used in debate to emphasize a point. With the exception of Mr. Pollock and Nantucket Red, not a single person who has commented on my post to this discussion has offered a single fact, observation or principle which would advance the argument one way or another. It would seem that those of you who are "experienced participants in online communities" would know a bit about the Socratic method. Because you have hundreds of posts to this forum in no way means you have anything to say. And, of course, calling someone a name or being critical of a style of writing is no answer to an argument.
     
  20. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Thank you for your note. Hyperbole is a common tactic used in debate to emphasize a point. With the exception of Mr. Pollock and Nantucket Red, not a single person who has commented on my post to this discussion has offered a single fact, observation or principle which would advance the argument one way or another. It would seem that those of you who are "experienced participants in online communities" would know a bit about the Socratic method. Because you have hundreds of posts to this forum in no way means you have anything to say. And, of course, calling someone a name or being critical of a style of writing is no answer to an argument.
    Err, which argument is that? Whether women buy or "assist in buying" 70% of men's shirts? The original post described an actual or hypothetical experience and solicited "comments". Since then, comments have been all over the board (pun intended).
    Having spent plenty of time in academic institutions, one "bit" I know about the Socratic method is that it's one of those things lots of people talk about but few have really mastered. In the hands of someone less than expert in its use, it can be remarkably ineffective. I'm not sure what exactly you mean by "a style of writing", but in my experience "calling out" rhetorical devices intended to obscure holes or flaws in the writer's argument (I haven't devoted enough time and attention to form an opinion as to whether that is what happened here) can be an effective, and certainly is a legitimate, form of advocacy.
     

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