• Hi, I'm the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earn a commission for the forum and allow us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear and fashion.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Double Breasted Style.

The Chai

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2015
Messages
1,487
Reaction score
1,200
I agree with you on most of these, but several points.

1) Simon's pictures are taken from way too low down and this distorts his shoulders horribly and makes them look much smaller. I don't think most people realize how much a poorly placed camera can distort things. Many of his jackets look better in video. Some of his jackets like the Dalcuore and Ciardi that don't have shoulders that are built up much just look awful in these pictures. He has a later Dalcuore that looks much more flattering.
View attachment 1568923
2) I think Simon's physique has gotten bulkier over time so some of his older jackets don't fit as well.
3) I actually like the Kathryn Sargent and C&M. In general, I think he looks better with a structured shoulder. I also believe those are both older suits, hence the fit issues.
Now I've gotten a belly I get alot of skirt flare :-/
 

9thsymph

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2012
Messages
1,051
Reaction score
1,073
@9thsymph
So if you are deciding on a tailor to use do you first ask their height?
Joking aside, here is another ball-park explanation of what I meant by perspective in relation to proportion:

"In his Sophist, Plato speaks of two kinds of image-making. The first is a faithful reproduction, attempted to copy precisely the original. The second is intentionally distorted in order to make the copy appear correct to viewers. He gives the example of Greek statuary, which was crafted larger on the top than on the bottom so that viewers on the ground would see it correctly. If they could view it in scale, they would realize it was malformed. This example from the visual arts serves as a metaphor for the philosophical arts and the tendency of some philosophers to distort the truth so that it appears accurate unless viewed from the proper angle.[5] Nietzsche addresses the concept of simulacrum (but does not use the term) in the Twilight of the Idols, suggesting that most philosophers, by ignoring the reliable input of their senses and resorting to the constructs of language and reason, arrive at a distorted copy of reality."
 

Despos

Distinguished Member
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Mar 16, 2006
Messages
7,786
Reaction score
3,669
Joking aside, here is another ball-park explanation of what I meant by perspective in relation to proportion:

"In his Sophist, Plato speaks of two kinds of image-making. The first is a faithful reproduction, attempted to copy precisely the original. The second is intentionally distorted in order to make the copy appear correct to viewers. He gives the example of Greek statuary, which was crafted larger on the top than on the bottom so that viewers on the ground would see it correctly. If they could view it in scale, they would realize it was malformed. This example from the visual arts serves as a metaphor for the philosophical arts and the tendency of some philosophers to distort the truth so that it appears accurate unless viewed from the proper angle.[5] Nietzsche addresses the concept of simulacrum (but does not use the term) in the Twilight of the Idols, suggesting that most philosophers, by ignoring the reliable input of their senses and resorting to the constructs of language and reason, arrive at a distorted copy of reality."
@9thsymph
Yeah, that pretty much sums it up!
 
Last edited:

Mr. Six

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2009
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
17,422
@Mr. Six @lordsuperb

What do you guys see in the SB’s you would change?
Have never cut a jacket for anyone with his shoulders and shoulder blades. I’m more adept at high, square shoulders than extreme sloping shoulders.
Would be a challenge
@lordsuperb pretty much nailed it. More holistically, I feel like often the trousers and jackets often look like they're for two different people. The lines of the jacket and the lines of the trousers don't flow together. It does seem like Simon has some particularly challenging aspects to his shape, and a number of tailors are trying too much to account for those and not paying enough attention to ensuring that the end result achieves a specific silhouette. I also agree with the comment that many of the photos are shot from a poor angle that's distorting issues--the photos out on the street often look better.
 

NakedYoga

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2008
Messages
1,559
Reaction score
1,527
Piggy backing off the discussion of the various Simon Crompton suits, what is the proper alteration for the lower back being too tight and accentuating the S curve of a man who actually has an ass?
 

ballmouse

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
1,217
Reaction score
341
I wonder if he provides directions for the tailors or if the tailors are cutting suits how they want to for him.
 

Despos

Distinguished Member
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Mar 16, 2006
Messages
7,786
Reaction score
3,669
I wonder if he provides directions for the tailors or if the tailors are cutting suits how they want to for him.
Seems to me if you write an honest review about a tailor's style and fit you would leave it all to them. If the tailor takes direction from Simon then the review is who interpreted my ideas the best and doesn't honestly show the tailors own perspective of how he would make a garment for him.
 
Last edited:

ballmouse

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
1,217
Reaction score
341
Agreed. I wondered though since I haven't read his blog. But also because the conversation is a big part of bespoke suits. If the tailor has trouble considering feedback or making changes or dismisses things a customer wants changed, that's important to note.

I don't know what most bespoke suit customers are thinking when they buy a suit, but there's got to be some (at least those that are following a fashion blog) that want to be a part of the process with ideas and whatnot. If he's not documenting things from that point of view, then maybe it's an idea worth considering.
 

Despos

Distinguished Member
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Mar 16, 2006
Messages
7,786
Reaction score
3,669
Agreed. I wondered though since I haven't read his blog. But also because the conversation is a big part of bespoke suits. If the tailor has trouble considering feedback or making changes or dismisses things a customer wants changed, that's important to note.

I don't know what most bespoke suit customers are thinking when they buy a suit, but there's got to be some (at least those that are following a fashion blog) that want to be a part of the process with ideas and whatnot. If he's not documenting things from that point of view, then maybe it's an idea worth considering.
For me it's the opposite of what you might think. 98% of my clients don't want to be involved. Don't know the percentage but the majority don't follow clothing blogs.
I make sure I understand how they want the suit to "feel" not "look" . That's what they get hooked on. If the clothes fit well they look good. It's a byproduct of getting fit and proportions right. Why wear a garment that looks great but doesn't feel good?
98% get the same style they prefer over and over. Many adapt a style as their signature and repeat it with every garment, like 1 button, peak. None of this changing this or that on this one or let's try this on another. That part is an internet thing, me thinks. Never had a client who wanted variation amongst their garments beyond choosing SB, DB or change of lapel stye or having patch pockets for a specific jacket/purpose.
From my experience it's puzzled me when someone says they wear so many variations. Exception; variation in cloth types and weight. Even then, have clients who buy the same weight for everything they wear.
Hesitate to post something contrary to much of the discussion of a site like this but that's my client profile.
 

ballmouse

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
1,217
Reaction score
341
That's a good point. I agree most folks don't want to deal with the hassle. I'm wondering if he's ever mentioned what (if anything) he says to the tailors. After all he's a fashion blogger and he has started selling his own products (or partnering with others who do). And it might be interesting to see a comparison of bespoke suits from the same tailoring house with zero input and with some input.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

What Is The Best Value Shoe Brand For Money?

  • Meermin

    Votes: 36 15.5%
  • TLB Mallorca

    Votes: 39 16.7%
  • Cheaney

    Votes: 7 3.0%
  • Carmina

    Votes: 35 15.0%
  • Crockett & Jones

    Votes: 39 16.7%
  • Other

    Votes: 77 33.0%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
457,116
Messages
9,907,062
Members
206,540
Latest member
aryjewellers
Top