Dog Fur and Suits

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Sartorially Challenged, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. Sartorially Challenged

    Sartorially Challenged Senior member

    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    What's the best way of removing dog fur from wool suits safely (i.e. without damaging the fabric)?

    Right now I am using this for my wool suits and this for my overcoats.

    Are they completely safe with fabrics like Super 120 and cashmere, respectively?

    They work marginally well with dog fur, so I am wondering whether there are better ways (I use sticky tape rolls for causual clothes, esp. cotton, but I am afraid to try those on suits).

    Thanks.
     
  2. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    The tape rollers work fine. I also have a rubber "brush" that works well on hair and fur. I would be gentle on delicate cashmere with either. Don't use a brand new piece of tape on soft fabrics - wear it out a bit first.
     
  3. gorgekko

    gorgekko Senior member

    Messages:
    2,121
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Location:
    The Dominion of Canada
    I must admit that when I saw the title to this thread, I thought I was going to read about someone attempting to make a suit out of dog fur, a la Monty Burns.

    [​IMG]

    Sing along here.
     
  4. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    you know, you can get your dog's hair spun into yarn. (i'm sure we've covered this before.)
     
  5. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

    Messages:
    4,078
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    The tape rollers work fine. Don't use a brand new piece of tape on soft fabrics - wear it out a bit first.

    Sage advise.
     
  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,607
    Likes Received:
    397
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    you know, you can get your dog's hair spun into yarn. (i'm sure we've covered this before.)

    It has to be a long-haired breed, though. Samoyeds are especially good, I've heard.
     
  7. Vintage Gent

    Vintage Gent Senior member

    Messages:
    2,748
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2003
    Location:
    The People's Republic of Galveston
    Removal is one thing, but prevention is the key. Best way to keep dog hair from finding its way onto your clothes? Remove the dog.

    I know many folks out there feel a special kinship with their pets, and I understand that emotional attachment. But how anyone who values the sartorial arts can come within a mile of a domestic animal, generally fithly things that they are, is beyond me.
     
  8. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,607
    Likes Received:
    397
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    But how anyone who values the sartorial arts can come within a mile of a domestic animal, generally fithly things that they are, is beyond me.

    You can always bathe your dog regularly to keep him from being filthy. The hair will still be around, but to many of us our dogs are worth the minor nuisance of brushing a few hairs off our apparel many, many times over!
     
  9. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    we have a white cat. the house could be spotless after having just been cleaned, and then not more than two days later all the horizontal surfaces that have fabric on them (the rugs, the bed [OUR bed - why she couldn't choose the kids' beds, is beyond me], chairs, etc.) would have a fine coating of white fur. rendering such surfaces dangerous for human proximity.

    she has a special affinity for dark surfaces. she thinks it sets off her whiteness for a more dramatic appearance when lounging.
     
  10. Dmntd

    Dmntd Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    Location:
    Sherman Oaks, Cali4nia
    I have two black cats, since most of my clothing is black, charcoal or dark grey there is little contrast, but I still see it on my cloths.

    I use a tape roller for removal of pet hair, dust and lint.

    Dmntd
     
  11. Sartorially Challenged

    Sartorially Challenged Senior member

    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    My dogs are actually very clean. I only raise Northern breeds that have feline cleanliness. One of the dogs has exceptionally clean, silky and beautiful coat, in fact, that would make excellent yarn (she is an old dog, but smells like a puppy, too).

    They do, however, shed much fur, particularly during the twice-a-year "blowing of the coat" seasons.

    During that time warm baths do help. However, during non-blow seasons, I try not to bathe them with water much since bathing strips their coat of natural oils that keep their coats clean and shiny (besides they bathe themselves several times everyday, being cleanliness freaks).

    The main problem is that the dogs have white undercoats (Northern breeds are generally double-coated), and since most of my clothing is dark, I have to be very fastidious about removing fur.
     
  12. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    My dogs are actually very clean. I only raise Northern breeds that have feline cleanliness. One of the dogs has exceptionally clean, silky and beautiful coat, in fact, that would make excellent yarn (she is an old dog, but smells like a puppy, too).

    They do, however, shed much fur, particularly during the twice-a-year "blowing of the coat" seasons.

    During that time warm baths do help. However, during non-blow seasons, I try not to bathe them with water much since bathing strips their coat of natural oils that keep their coats clean and shiny (besides they bathe themselves several times everyday, being cleanliness freaks).

    The main problem is that the dogs have white undercoats (Northern breeds are generally double-coated), and since most of my clothing is dark, I have to be very fastidious about removing fur.

    Are these Keeshonds?
     
  13. Sartorially Challenged

    Sartorially Challenged Senior member

    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    No, I do not have any Keeshonds right now, but I'd like to try the breed in the future.

    The dogs I have now are, however, somewhat related to Keeshonds.
     
  14. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    No, I do not have any Keeshonds right now, but I'd like to try the breed in the future.

    The dogs I have now are, however, somewhat related to Keeshonds.

    Is it a secret breed?
     
  15. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Here is a picture of my Keeshond Shadow - he died a few years back, this is the only pic I have of him on the computer. Great dog, once I got him trained. When I got him, he was very angry and frustrated, having been terrorized by two giant poodles. It took about 6 months of constant training before he was happy again. He became a curmudgeon again in his old age, though.

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by