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Do you work with your hands for a living or for fun?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by blue collar, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Hey Guys,

    I know this SF is dominated by office workers (for obvious reasons). I just want to see how many of you work with your hands for a living or just for fun. Do you work on cars, with leather, landscape, work with wood etc?

    Post up pics of what you do/ what you work on/ the tools you use.

    I'm a Hydraulics tech. Our shop works on mobile and industrial hydraulic sytems and related components. I also have my tickets in MIG and TIG welding.

    I know greasy hands should never be in the same room as cordovan shoes but thats 'how i roll' :slayer:

    Here is a shot of my rig at work
    [​IMG]

    and a few drawers

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2012
  2. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    ^^^Impressive setup you have there.
     
  3. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    Snap-On :slayer: You ever work with Knipex? I'm a big fan of their wrenches.

    We need more blue collar types around here. If I had the space I'd outfit myself with a whole garage full of tools too.
     
  4. guyver00

    guyver00 Senior member

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    Seeing those photos make me think of Tim Allan in Home Improvement.
     
  5. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Thanks very much. A lot of years gathering them. And too much money...
     
  6. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Yah knipex is great stuff. great fit and finish.
     
  7. RanMan

    RanMan Senior member

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    Nice set up!

    Although I've rebuilt engines, changed clutches, and dropped tranny's on the pavement of a cold January driveway, my hands are really about this...
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  8. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Thats an awesome shot! Are you in a band or DJ/perform solo? Any links to your music?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  9. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I wish I had tools like that (or space for them).

    I do my own work on my motorcycle and bicycles and am always trying to do stupid home improvement projects (stupid since I live in a rental and if I didn't enjoy the work, there would be no good reason to do it) and furniture building.
     
  10. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Ya it can be hard in a rental/condo building. It was a toss up for me, live in a condo and have no room for toys and tools or buy a house and drive an hour to work :confused:
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    That's a lot of money worth of tools/toolbox. Out of sheer curiosity, if you work with your hands and such, what brings you to Style Forum? Do you like to dress outside of work?
     
  12. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    I guess being stuck wearing "shop blues" on the daily has taken it's toll on me. I also never liked the stigma around "blue collar" workers and that they fit into the category of being uncultured with little to no style/fashion sense. I catch more flack at my shop than anywhere else, even though I'm the shop foreman, so it's not just people on the outside who feel this way. They too feel that if you work in a trade you have to look the part when you're off the clock. I don't agree and tend to practice a little leisure elegance whenever possible.

    Women also tend to notice when you put a little effort into how you look. A free beer case t-shirt, flip-flops and camo cargo shorts don't attract the kind of women i'm interested in knowing...:satisfied:

    edit: Also being in a trade, I tend to 'geek out' over learning about how quality items are made. Watching endless videos online of the bespoke shoe process, full canvas suits, cordovan production, Harris tweed etc.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Interesting. My father owns a "blue collar" shop and looking at him you would think he was just a worker bee there. He has absolutely no interest in anything clothing related despite his uncanny ability to create and fix things. When he goes out he dresses simply because he has to, no more effort than that. When I walk into the shop wearing a suit he likes to bust my chops, "Ay guys, come look at this fag in a suit! Hack, hack, hack!" Seems kind of mean, but it is all in good fun, plus he really is the one who should be laughing, he makes multiples of what I do in his blues!
     
  14. blue collar

    blue collar Senior member

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    Your father sounds like a hardened, old school shop guy. Like the men I have been around for the last 10 years. But I agree, it tends to be the reaction I get in the locker room at work. Fancy boy, fonzie can tend to be the names they call me, all in good fun. But the funny thing is i'm straight as an arrow, 200 lbs with 8'' suit drop and more than capable of killing them with my bare hands ha ha. Different strokes I guess...


    ...thats not the worst of it. I'm also fully trained in clasic frech cooking. :embar:

    What did your father's shop specialize in?
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Car repair, small engine repair, and body work. His father was a machinist and so was he until he bought this business ~35 years ago.
     
  16. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Is your dad really doing that well by owning a shop? Not doubting, just genuinely curious. I used to love working on cars, and I still enjoy putting some time into my Jeep, but I never seriously considered it as a career path, mostly because I figured I wouldn't be happy with the money.
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A lot of shops do poorly. He's honest and does good work, that's why I feel he does so well. It is easy to find thief mechanics. The majority of the big money is from body work, probably 70% of the business.
     
  18. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Gotcha. That makes sense. I suppose it's probably repeat business and references that make him the money. It doesn't surprise me that body work is the way to go in terms of making money - I'd think the profit margins would be pretty big.

    I could be honest and do good work. Maybe I missed my calling!
     
  19. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Body work is also the least fun to do :(
     
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Move to Jersey and work with my pops!!! Yeah, a majority of the big profit margins are in body work like you said. A lot of it is insurance work, but there are many certifications and environmental laws that you have to be able to comply with these days to do insurance work. Things such as how you handle the waste and spray booths with filtration systems. If you want the constant flow of body work, which is 95% paid by insurance companies you have some big upfront costs to qualify.

    Also he is in good with the municipalities in the area, does all of the work on cop cars, busses and so on. He's practically like the mayor. He's a damn good guy so good things come his way.
     

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