• Hi, I'm the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earn a commission for the forum and allow us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear and fashion.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Do you see a difference if an item is marked as "unisex" vs "mens"?

mangoyogurt

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
I'm planning to launch a unisex denim jacket and was wondering if people think sizing / cut and sew would be different depending on how it's presented.
Generally, unisex caters towards men's sizing but women can also wear it. Would you buy a men's jacket over a unisex jacket? Or does it not matter?

Any insights would be appreciated!
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
2,746
Reaction score
2,071
I’m not sure many women would be interested in a jacket that’s cut unisex. Just my observation.
 

breakaway01

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2013
Messages
2,244
Reaction score
1,176
Do you have much experience with pattern making for women's versus men's clothing? I don't, but it seems readily apparent that a woman's jacket is often cut quite differently from a man's jacket. For example, women's jackets tend to be cut shorter in the body, and there are darts in the chest to accommodate a woman's bust. Front buttoning is usually different. I'm sure there are more differences than I'm aware of.
 

mangoyogurt

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
Do you have much experience with pattern making for women's versus men's clothing? I don't, but it seems readily apparent that a woman's jacket is often cut quite differently from a man's jacket. For example, women's jackets tend to be cut shorter in the body, and there are darts in the chest to accommodate a woman's bust. Front buttoning is usually different. I'm sure there are more differences than I'm aware of.

we've been working on the fit for 2 years now. thanks for your feedback! it's more of a relaxed fit rather than a fitted type of jacket. also, denim jackets typically don't have darts because the fabric is really thick and was originally a unisex garment.

I was actually wondering if it affected men's perception of the fit by using "unisex" over "men's".
 

breakaway01

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2013
Messages
2,244
Reaction score
1,176
It depends on how the jackets will be marketed. Honestly I tend not to look closely at garments that are billed as 'unisex', not because there is anything inherently wrong with the concept but I think I have been conditioned to think that they won't fit as well as clothing designed for men.
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
2,746
Reaction score
2,071
It doesn’t affect my perception of fit as fit is fit. I just don’t understand the concept I guess.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
20,799
Reaction score
49,854
Unisex is one of the bigger trends in womenswear right now.

I think it would be easier if you just provided measurements and gave sizing advice on the site. So say, "women size up, men take your regular size." Etc.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
20,799
Reaction score
49,854
One more thing:

The biggest and most obvious gender marker for clothing is the way a coat fastened. Men's clothing fastens to the left; women to the right. If you make unisex clothing, it will be easier to sell this stuff if you design the coats for men, but then market it as unisex. Men are generally much more gender sensitive than women, and less willing to wear women's clothing. Some will know this buttoning thing, so they'll avoid it.

Some coats are also easier to cut for unisex styles. The chore coat, for example. If you're making denim chore coat, it will be a much easier sell if you make it as a men's garment and sell it as unisex. Lots of womenswear lines nowadays are basically unisex -- Chimala, parts of Isabel Marant, Studio Nicholson, etc.
 

johng70

Senior Member
Joined
May 13, 2013
Messages
724
Reaction score
522
The buttoning is one point, but for a denim jacket, length is going to be an issue. Women's jackets are shorter than men's. So, a jacket that fits both a man & woman in the chest is likely going to be longer on the woman than what she's used to or shorter on a man than he's used to. For a standard jacket this is important since it's as much a fashion statement as practical. As the other poster mentioned, a chore coat concept is much more likely to be a non-issue - but then, it's also a smaller market. And, denim isn't usually a material I would associate with that purpose of coat - more luck a duck fabric (carhartt). Even then, I would be interested if sleeve length were different even if body length could be the same.

Beyond practical aspects, I believe commercially the concept of unisex carries a connotation of "cheap" - a $20 product that's unisex might be fine, but more expensive and you'll lose customers for that reason.
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
2,746
Reaction score
2,071
Certain brands carry what they call a “boyfriend” style. Like Boyfriend jean, boyfriend shirt, etc. these are typically cut a bit roomier and modeled by hot, young 20 something women who otherwise look as though they are annoyed at having to show up for the photo shoot.

Even then, the styling is better suited for the feminine form. Labeling something unisex is fine. But then it’s neither fish nor fowl. Men and women seek different things from the clothes they wear.
 

mangoyogurt

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
It depends on how the jackets will be marketed. Honestly I tend not to look closely at garments that are billed as 'unisex', not because there is anything inherently wrong with the concept but I think I have been conditioned to think that they won't fit as well as clothing designed for men.
I see your point of view, I wonder if other people feel the same way. so would a comprehensible size chart / fit guide ease your worry ?
 

mangoyogurt

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
Unisex is one of the bigger trends in womenswear right now.

I think it would be easier if you just provided measurements and gave sizing advice on the site. So say, "women size up, men take your regular size." Etc.
yup, that's exactly what we're doing!
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

What Is The Best Value Shoe Brand For Money?

  • Meermin

    Votes: 30 16.2%
  • TLB Mallorca

    Votes: 31 16.8%
  • Cheaney

    Votes: 5 2.7%
  • Carmina

    Votes: 30 16.2%
  • Crockett & Jones

    Votes: 30 16.2%
  • Other

    Votes: 59 31.9%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
456,865
Messages
9,900,876
Members
206,431
Latest member
coololeg
Top