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Do you like the country you currently live in?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Coho, Mar 23, 2008.

  1. dizzhizz

    dizzhizz Senior member

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    It doesn't take a lot for me to be happy with my surroundings. I was happy in the US and I'm certainly happy in Korea. I'd say I'm currently happier here, but that's because my recent memories were in lilly-white suburbia, where there were more lowered white S-10s than there were non-whites. Despite being in Korea, where everyone is Korean, there's a really good feeling of internationality, and I have access to pretty much everything I want.

    Can you expand on this a bit more? Especially having access to everything you want while I presume there might be some obvious language/cultural barriers?
     
  2. kimchikowboy

    kimchikowboy Senior member

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    Usually, unless I'm driving. (South Korea)
     
  3. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    Not really, hence why I'm moving to Jeju-do.
     
  4. strazzaque

    strazzaque Senior member

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    I love Australia so very much, and would not have left but for the wife. Long term, my plan is to return here, as I am not keen on adapting the American way of life as my own, or my children's, for that matter.
     
  5. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    Vietnam drives me crazy but it keeps me entertained.

    It is great to live in a place that is changing before my eyes. I go away for a week, come back, and Ill spot like four new things...shops/bars/cafes/buildings whatever.

    Related to that is watching people try to come to terms with that change, and try to work stuff that the developed world takes for granted (like ATM machines) into their own routines.

    Related to that - and as cheesy and self important as it may sound - I can Make A Difference here. I built my industry...before I came to town there were a couple of local companies doing shadyPRwork. Me (and a guy who came a couple of months after me too) can pretty legitimately claim to have invented an industry here. That is kinda cool. Along with that comes the ability to change people's lives...I have staff who were dirt poor a couple of years ago, and find themselves upper middle classers now. People who had never been further away than Vung Tau (45 min boat ride) who now lead local media on tours to France etc etc. That is very rewarding.

    On a personal level, I guess I have everything I want. Great friends, great lifestyle, great girlfriend, great job, great social life, great house, too many motorbikes etc etc etc. Can't complain.

    The place frustrates the hell out of me as often as I enjoy it, but I do find it fascinating, so I went with 'sometimes' on the poll.
     
  6. babygreenspots

    babygreenspots Senior member

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    I tend to like countries that to which I haven't been or in which I haven't spent much time.
     
  7. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    It doesn't take a lot for me to be happy with my surroundings. I was happy in the US and I'm certainly happy in Korea. I'd say I'm currently happier here, but that's because my recent memories were in lilly-white suburbia, where there were more lowered white S-10s than there were non-whites. Despite being in Korea, where everyone is Korean, there's a really good feeling of internationality, and I have access to pretty much everything I want.
    ya, but there are phases of expatriate Brian, and you are still very much in the first phase of elation. Next phase is where it all collapses around you and you hate everything about Asia and plot the deaths of every single person you deal with every day. It normalises after that, and you kinda get to like it.
     
  8. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    ya, but there are phases of expatriate Brian, and you are still very much in the first phase of elation.

    Next phase is where it all collapses around you and you hate everything about Asia and plot the deaths of every single person you deal with every day.

    It normalises after that, and you kinda get to like it.


    [​IMG]
     
  9. Hanseat

    Hanseat Senior member

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    Location:
    Freiburg, Germany
    Generally, I have to say that I love living in Germany.
    Every place has its up- ad downsides but after having lived in the US and been to a lot of countries I have to say that this is it. Only possible exception being Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland but these aren't that different... in choosing a lifestyle it's pretty much what I want here.
     
  10. Coho

    Coho Senior member

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    Matt,


    I enjoy reading about your experience. One quick comment:

    I sometimes misspell certain words in my posts. For example, in this one, I forgot the word "like" in the poll title and I can't change it. However, a spelling guardian angel just added that word in for me. I wonder who has the power to do it [​IMG]

    Vietnam drives me crazy but it keeps me entertained.

    It is great to live in a place that is changing before my eyes. I go away for a week, come back, and Ill spot like four new things...shops/bars/cafes/buildings whatever.

    Related to that is watching people try to come to terms with that change, and try to work stuff that the developed world takes for granted (like ATM machines) into their own routines.

    Related to that - and as cheesy and self important as it may sound - I can Make A Difference here. I built my industry...before I came to town there were a couple of local companies doing shadyPRwork. Me (and a guy who came a couple of months after me too) can pretty legitimately claim to have invented an industry here. That is kinda cool. Along with that comes the ability to change people's lives...I have staff who were dirt poor a couple of years ago, and find themselves upper middle classers now. People who had never been further away than Vung Tau (45 min boat ride) who now lead local media on tours to France etc etc. That is very rewarding.

    On a personal level, I guess I have everything I want. Great friends, great lifestyle, great girlfriend, great job, great social life, great house, too many motorbikes etc etc etc. Can't complain.

    The place frustrates the hell out of me as often as I enjoy it, but I do find it fascinating, so I went with 'sometimes' on the poll.
     
  11. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    the vast majoirty of issues people raise against the US are raised because the person hasn't lived outside the US.


    Or expats who have left the US for their own reasons. I know a lot of Americans who while "successful" in career and social lives, chose to leave the US and are very critical of the state of the country. Sometimes we are also very critical of things we know well.

    While I loved my upbringing in America and will always love the US and my visits home, I dont think that at this time in my life I can live there.

    Right now I get so much out of living in Europe that I cannot get in the US.

    (with the exception of good fried chicken and buffalo wings)

    K
     
  12. JoelF

    JoelF Senior member

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    ya, but there are phases of expatriate Brian, and you are still very much in the first phase of elation.

    Next phase is where it all collapses around you and you hate everything about Asia and plot the deaths of every single person you deal with every day.

    It normalises after that, and you kinda get to like it.


    Great nutshell summary of the expat experience, exactly what I found during my five years in Mexico City. Then again, in Miami, supposedly an American city, I never got beyond step 2. [​IMG]
     
  13. eg1

    eg1 Senior member

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    Oh, very much. The weather generally sucks (humidity) but it is the world capital of smugness, after all, eh? [​IMG]
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Or expats who have left the US for their own reasons. I know a lot of Americans who while "successful" in career and social lives, chose to leave the US and are very critical of the state of the country. Sometimes we are also very critical of things we know well.

    While I loved my upbringing in America and will always love the US and my visits home, I dont think that at this time in my life I can live there.

    Right now I get so much out of living in Europe that I cannot get in the US.

    (with the exception of good fried chicken and buffalo wings)

    K


    good point - although I don't know that I knew many expats who had "left the states" as opposed to "gone someplace else" if you know what I mean. most of the expats I knew and know lived abroad because they wanted to live abroad, not because they dind't want to live in the US. there are, of course, exceptions.

    but I was refering, specifically, to those americans who feel america is more X or Y or Z than other countries - I believe in most cases it is because they don't know that much about other countries.
     
  15. tiger02

    tiger02 Senior member

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    good point - although I don't know that I knew many expats who had "left the states" as opposed to "gone someplace else" if you know what I mean. most of the expats I knew and know lived abroad because they wanted to live abroad, not because they dind't want to live in the US. there are, of course, exceptions.

    but I was refering, specifically, to those americans who feel america is more X or Y or Z than other countries - I believe in most cases it is because they don't know that much about other countries.

    Our wimminz are hot, so I like it here (Hungary) Most frustrating thing I've heard from an American expat: "Oh, I lost that American 'thing' a long time ago. I'm 'European' now." When did self-loathing get to be so cool?
     
  16. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

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    Tough question for me. The Philippines is where my grandparents migrated to escape poverty in China. Our family has done pretty well in this country, and we are lucky to be well off. I also find satisfaction in this age that I am living in a place where I am surrounded by a slew of family and friends, and the people in this country are truly and genuinely very nice people.

    On the other hand, this country has been wallowing in its 3rd world state because of its own making. I don't need to go down the details but suffice to say this country has all the potential to be prosperous and be more than what it is right now but somehow growth has been hindered because of its own making.

    Its truly heartbreaking specially now that I am a parent and of course you always want a better environment for your kid/kids. The only consolation is that people here are starting to realize that a country's future is dictated by the choices everyone makes and perhaps in time the country can get out of its rut.

    And we still don't have a BB store here! Boooo!
     
  17. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Our wimminz are hot, so I like it here (Hungary)

    Most frustrating thing I've heard from an American expat: "Oh, I lost that American 'thing' a long time ago. I'm 'European' now." When did self-loathing get to be so cool?


    Since James Joyce.
     
  18. Guy Burgess

    Guy Burgess Senior member

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    Are you referring to New Zealand?

    Sorry, didn't spot this. Yes, I am referring to New Zealand, but more specifically one place here, as I haven't lived anywhere else since I moved here in 2006 and although I don't really want to live anywhere else in NZ right now, I can't really judge other places having only spent a few days here and there elsewhere.
     
  19. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    good point - although I don't know that I knew many expats who had "left the states" as opposed to "gone someplace else" if you know what I mean. most of the expats I knew and know lived abroad because they wanted to live abroad, not because they dind't want to live in the US. there are, of course, exceptions.

    but I was refering, specifically, to those americans who feel america is more X or Y or Z than other countries - I believe in most cases it is because they don't know that much about other countries.


    Yeah, maybe 'left the states' was the wrong way for me to put it. I have come across people who have jumped on an opportunity to live abroad, or who have purposefully sought employers or career paths for their likelyhood of moving abroad. Some because they just want a bit of an adventure, but a couple because they just did not like their lives in America or the state of the country.

    I think America is more X or Y than alot of countries. But alot of countries are also more A or B than America.
     
  20. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Yeah, maybe 'left the states' was the wrong way for me to put it. I have come across people who have jumped on an opportunity to live abroad, or who have purposefully sought employers or career paths for their likelyhood of moving abroad. Some because they just want a bit of an adventure, but a couple because they just did not like their lives in America or the state of the country.

    I think America is more X or Y than alot of countries. But alot of countries are also more A or B than America.


    sure - I lived most of my life in differnt countries, and if my wife had agreed to it my preference would be to live in a differnt country every 3 years or so for the rest of my life. every country I've lived in has had its advantages. but I wouldn't say that I moved because I wanted to get away from one country or another.

    I also know a few american ex-pats who just don't enjoy living in the US. I remember a friend who had lived about 10-12 years in Prague (at the right time) and then Mumbai (also at the right time). he got a job in arkansas, and within a couple of months he was going crazy, he felt he had nothing in common with his nieghbors or co-workers.
     

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