Do you know martial art? What kind? What Level?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Soph, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    That's precisely not why I do it (thought I mentioned that).

    you did mention it, and i wasn't talking about you! [​IMG]
     


  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    putting fear in a roomfull of mcdojo blackbelts is a HORRIBLE measure of practical effectiveness.

    let me explain my viewpoints on krav maga. some places that teach krav maga are great. however, most places, like many combatives, are just using clever marketing to mask what is more similar to a traditional martial art--with all the artificial mystique and heirarchy. there are some good schools, one of my good friends is a highly respected krav maga instructor (he also has a substantial amateur boxing career and years of competitive, black-belt level judo--coincidence?). i would DEFINITELY recommend his school, but most schools are not like that (and i think he would even agree with this).

    btw, i highly disagree about the learning curve statement--for traditional arts, yeah, of course krav maga will be more effective within the first 200 hours (or more). but for bjj? for muay thai? even for regular western boxing? come on, man! in the first 200 hours, a bjj student will learn how to take the krav maga guy down, maintain position, and apply 1-2 submissions. in muay thai and boxing, they would spend all that time sparring and conditioning and would be much more ready than the KM guy.

    also, you are saying that the only way to get good at BJJ is to put in 14 hours a week? i know plenty of people who have very busy lives who put in only a few hours a week and are pretty good.


    honestly, I have no idea how krav is tought in the states, but I imagine that you may be right. most of the people who have krav schools have extensive backgrounds in other martial arts - I think it is the suporting arts that dictate how they run the school, if they are boxers or do something pretty serious, then the school will be more serious. real krav is the real deal, but there isn't money in teaching people short courses.

    as to the learning curve - we will have to disagree there. the whole point of krav, how it was desiegned and built, was for the short learning curve.
     


  3. MysticAura

    MysticAura Senior member

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    Hey guys,

    Slightly off-topic here but I'm going to start Muay Thai in the fall. Does anyone have any advice on how to stretch for high kick flexibility? I have a month and a half to stretch before I start training.
     


  4. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    assuming that you are going to a real muay thai gym, i wouldn't worry about your flexibility.

    muay thai is mostly leg kicks.

    the most important thing is to improve your cardio. muay thai is very cardiovascularly demanding.
     


  5. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    assuming that you are going to a real muay thai gym, i wouldn't worry about your flexibility.

    muay thai is mostly leg kicks.

    the most important thing is to improve your cardio. muay thai is very cardiovascularly demanding.


    I agree about the cardio, but if he is going to be fighting American Freestyle rules, there are going to be more high kicks.

    BTW, Mystic, leg kicks are nothing to laugh at. After a bunch of those landing on your thighs, you'll barely be able to lift your legs to kick or block, and after a little longer, your legs literally seize up on you. Not really pretty. And you'll feel like an idiot.
     


  6. MysticAura

    MysticAura Senior member

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    Thanks, I am currently doing 15 descending sets of burpies 2x a week and a 3 mile run every other day. I will be incorporating rope jumping soon as well.

    I will be training at The Wat in NYC with Kru Phil Nurse. Noone's mentioned any stretches yet. As of now, I cannot kick my leg above my waist.

    Any tips?
     


  7. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    in my opinion, the wat is the best place to learn muay thai in NYC. great people, great trainers. several of my good friends train there.

    ok, stretching 101. these are basic rules for a beginner. there are exceptions to these rules but not recommended until you get a better feel for your body and have a little more flexibility:

    1) never stretch cold. it's easy to tear muscles or create "micro-tears" which we will get into in a minute. always stretch after your body is warmed up. this could be after 10 minutes of jump rope or after your jog.

    2) don't do ballistic stretching! an example of ballistic stretching would be swinging your legs to stretch them. always do static stretching which is using constant, progressively more intense pressure. ballistic stretching may create "micro-tears" which are small tears in your muscles that heal with scar tissue. you might gain immediate flexibility gains, but in the long run, the scar tissue will make your muscles permanently inflexible.

    3) breathe when you stretch. when applying pressure to your muscles, breathe out. this is important. this will give you a better stretch, it will relax your muscle for maximum gains. which brings us to point 4.

    4) relax into your stretch. stretching only happens when your muscle is relaxed. never tense up your muscle when you are stretching. relax, breathe and stretch.

    5) never go beyond slight discomfort and never to the point of pain. you will be able to tell when you are getting a good stretch and when you are going to far. never go to pain, but slight discomfort is what you are looking for.

    ok, now we can go into the stretches....
     


  8. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    butterfly stretch: good first stretch because it stretches your groin and hips. sit on the ground, put the bottoms of your feet together, have your knees pointing out, kinda like sitting indian-style. push down on your knees toward the floor. hold this stretch (and all stretches) for at least 6 seconds. release, and repeat several times. gently "flap" your knees like wings to loosen them up if needed.

    modified hurdler's stretch: now time to stretch the hamstrings. extend on leg out of your butterfly position. straight ahead, with toes pointing up. your other foot should be bent inward touching the inside of your thigh. reach for your toes and stretch for 6 seconds. release, and repeat. (are you remembering to breathe out when you stretch?) you should feel the stretch on your hamstrings and your calf. switch legs and repeat on the other side. you should imagine trying to touch your chest to the floor (not gonna happen yet, but that's the pressure you want).

    more to come....
     


  9. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    butt stretch: while one leg is extended from the previous stretch, take the other bent leg and point it upwards and bring the foot over to the outside of the other leg. so it looks like your are sitting crosslegged with the non-bent leg extended. take your arms and hug your bent knee to your chest. you should feel a stretch in your butt. after you've stretched this a couple times, take your tricep on the extended leg side and put it on the thigh of the bent leg. take your other hand and put it on the ground behind you for balance. now twist your waist and look behind you. you will feel a further stretch in your butt and your back. let me know if you need pictures of this.
    repeat for the other side.

    chinese splits: extend both legs so you make a V. push gently with both hands behind you so that your hips extend forward. you will feel both hamstrings get a nice stretch. you will also get a stretchin your groin. hold this position, relax and then push a little bit farther, widening your legs and pushing your but further in front. repeat as necessary. then take on hand and reach for the opposite foot. stretch, repeat, etc. repeat on the other side. next, reach forward and push your chest as far as it will go towards the ground, keeping your head facing foward. relax, repeat, etc.

    more to come...
     


  10. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    Mystic, I think (hope) starting out with Muay Thai is just conditioning. That is the martial art where you HAVE to be able to take a punch and kick. I'm heard from people, expect to go home bruised and bloodied (and even losing a few teeth!) after learning Muay Thai....until I guess your body becomes a giant callus and you turn into a monster. As far as most effective martial art in the real world, in response to the origional post....even though I have no experience in MA...I'm going to say Wudang. The health benefits you'd gain from them would help you far more than fighting skills you'd get from others so you can go to bars and start fights. Not to mention, you can be a badass fighter with taiji or xingyi if you get into it deep enough. Speaking of which, does anyone know any good Bagua teachers in Houston? [​IMG] edit: type in "wudang" into the search box on youtube.com for excellent demonstrations by masters
     


  11. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    now some standing stretches:

    quad stretch: stand up next to a wall. hold wall with one hand. with the other hand grab your instep on the foot on the same side as the grabbing hand. while keeping the knee pointing to the floor, pull back on the foot and gently push your hips forward. you will feel the stretch on your quad and your hip flexor. relax, repeat, etc., etc., switch legs, etc...

    calf stretch: go to the wall, put both hands on it to steady yourself. put your foot on the wall with your heel touching the ground and your toes on the wall. leg straight. gently lean into the wall to stretch your calf.

    groin stretch: make a horse stance, which is both feet wide apart, bending at both knees, knees wide apart, facing forward. just like a sumo wrestler. push your forearms against your inner thighs and push your knees out. also drop your hips down. you should feel a stretch in your inner thighs and groin.
     


  12. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    these are basic stretches. there are more sport-specific stretches you will learn from phil nurse and the trainers there. but these stretches will get you ready for the gym. i'm sure many people will chime in on their favorite stretches. but these are the bread and butter ones you should always do.
     


  13. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    Mystic, DO NOT listen to javyn. he has never done muay thai or even wudang. he has NO CLUE of what he's talking about. trust me.

    you picked the right school. the wat is a great environment to learn. everything is done safely and you won't be made to spar until you are ready. i know all sorts of people who train there, some train for fun and health, some are professional fighters, some are women looking for a good effective self-defense and workout.

    it's a very friendly environment with a lot of support and comraderie. never take advice from someone who has never done this stuff. not to say that there are no bad schools in NYC. i know a couple that you should avoid because they have a unfriendly attitude that promotes injuries. but the wat is great. when i have more time, i will probably train there with my buddies.

    when your standup striking is decent, please visit my school (pm for details) and you can work on your ground skills! [​IMG]


    Mystic, I think (hope) starting out with Muay Thai is just conditioning. That is the martial art where you HAVE to be able to take a punch and kick. I'm heard from people, expect to go home bruised and bloodied (and even losing a few teeth!) after learning Muay Thai....until I guess your body becomes a giant callus and you turn into a monster.

    As far as most effective martial art in the real world, in response to the origional post....even though I have no experience in MA...I'm going to say Wudang. The health benefits you'd gain from them would help you far more than fighting skills you'd get from others so you can go to bars and start fights. Not to mention, you can be a badass fighter with taiji or xingyi if you get into it deep enough.

    Speaking of which, does anyone know any good Bagua teachers in Houston? [​IMG]



    edit: type in "wudang" into the search box on youtube.com for excellent demonstrations by masters
     


  14. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    get a good health insurance policy

    just kidding

    by the way, it should be obvious to anyone, regardless of experience, that muay thai is far more physical than any other MA, and requires lots of conditioning of the body. i dont know why saying that in different words makes me not know what i'm talking about. you might get better answers mystic from martialartsplanet.com
     


  15. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Senior member

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