Do you know martial art? What kind? What Level?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Soph, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    I trained in Okinawan Goju-Ryu when I was a young lad. I had a couple of AAU championships under my belt, but I don't think this style is very effective in the street. I also wrestled for my school when I was younger. When I got older I trained some boxing and kickboxing, but nothing competitive.

    People don't really mess me with me, but if it came to fistacuffs, I can hold my own using a mixture of my fight training. I prefer the old-school Jersey style baseball bat beatdown though to actually fighting with fists and feet.
     


  2. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Savate.
     


  3. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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    Jujitsu (both japanese & brazilian) for several years, some judo, aikido.
     


  4. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    As a former student of Aikido I have to say: not Aikido. Any fighting style that relies on complicated techniques involving fine motor skills is going to be incredibly difficult to pull off in an impromptu fight unless you a) study it constantly and b) get into fights constantly. That's not to say that the ideals of Aikido aren't helpful, such as falling effectively, redirecting your opponent as to place yourself out of the line of his attack, etc., but I would never rely on it as a primary form of defense.

    From what I've read/seen/heard:

    Krav Maga for ending a fight fast
    BJJ for when a fight (inevitably) goes to the ground
    Muay Thai for extended standing fights
     


  5. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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    As a former student of Aikido I have to say: not Aikido. Any fighting style that relies on complicated techniques involving fine motor skills is going to be incredibly difficult to pull off in an impromptu fight
    Agreed. It is a very "theoretical" martial art.
     


  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    from what I have systema is a lot like krav - for my money, its hard to say what is better, but you can find a krav school in almost every major metro center, systema you have to be pretty lucky to find a school.

    dusty -yeah, I had a friend who was a very serious akido practitioner, and he couldn't use it for shit in any type of real situation.

    I like krav myself.
     


  7. Mute

    Mute Senior member

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    Each have their strengths and weaknesses. What is best will be the one that best suits your temparament, personality and physical makeup. That being said, krav and other similar MMC type arts are good for getting quickly adapted to fighting. More important, IMO, than the specific style is to find an instructor who's teachings focus on actually fighting and self defense and not just the art and forms of the various martial arts.

    To answer your original question, I have 20 years training in Wing Chun, 10 in Tai Chi Chuan and JKD and just started looking into krav maga as well.
     


  8. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    "those who know don't show" [​IMG]
     


  9. Buddy Love

    Buddy Love Senior member

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    Aikido, BJJ, taekwondo.

    The best is strength training. Weight is power. Overweight is overpower.

    Seriously. The best art is that, which teaches you to remain levelheaded in real situations. The arts, which include sparring (against a resisting opponent) are IMO the most appropiate ones.
     


  10. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    Taekwondo is about as useful as Iaido in a fight.
     


  11. Largo

    Largo Senior member

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    Eh, I'll probably second mute on this one. As long as you know the style in question covers a lot of techniques (ie: Not just striking, or just grappling, etc), it really depends more on the school than the style. The advantage to something like Krav Maga or Muay Thai or BJJ is that it's sort of implied that there will be a lot of application and sparring when you learn the style. That being said, I've met plenty of people who took Kung Fu (notably Wing Chun and Mantis) who could handle themselves fine because their teacher drilled them on sparring and 'real world' situations virtually every class they took.

    So yeah, just make sure you don't end up at a school where all you do is kick bags and patiently stand still while your partner performs complicated holds on you while you don't resist. Because honestly, that seems to be most of them (the schools, that is).
     


  12. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    hmm.

    there is a lot of speculation in this thread, but i've actually trained in most of the styles mentioned. i also compete competitively in submission wrestling and several of my good friends are pro and amateur mixed martial arts fighters (a.k.a. vale tudo, no holds barred, ultimate fighting, cage fighting, etc).

    let me tell you first off, that physical conditioning is the biggest factor in fighting. if you are strong, powerful and athletic, you will have an advantage in a fight, even over a moderately skilled (but weak) opponent.

    second of all, it doesn't matter what style you study, as long as they train full-contact with a 100% resisting opponent. what styles do this? boxing, wrestling, judo, bjj, mma, muay thai. it's no surprise that these styles are also considered the most effective martial arts. (notice i did not include krav maga and systema and other "lethal" top-secret special ops military styles)

    third, to be effective in a hand-to-hand street fight, you need to cover all the ranges of fighting--striking, clinch and ground. for striking, boxing and muay thai have the longest history of proven effectiveness. for clinch, greco-roman and judo are two of the most effective in this range. and for ground, BJJ is by far the most effective. if you become proficient in all three ranges, you will be fine in a hand-to-hand confrontation.

    lastly, and maybe the most important thing, no art will give you the magical skill of defending against a knife or a gun. any martial art that claims this is selling you a fantasy.

    the best self-defense is awareness and avoiding dangerous situations. you can avoid 99% of dangerous confrontations.
     


  13. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    Taekwondo is about as useful as Iaido in a fight.

    Hmm. I might take that challenge if I get to use a live blade instead of an iaito. Kesagiri vs axe kick--who wins?
     


  14. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    I know some southern and northern chinese styles (no belt rankings) and got 2nd degree black belt in tae kwon do... also limited muay thai.. I dont like grappling stuff. I learn martial arts for the fun / health of it, not to knock people out.
     


  15. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

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    Hmm. I might take that challenge if I get to use a live blade instead of an iaito. Kesagiri vs axe kick--who wins?
    LOL. I would go I think with a nice straight shomen-uchi strike. Unless the assailant is wearing a motorbike helmet, lol (wouldn't want to hurt the blade [​IMG] ) P.s. I am with Brian SD on this.
     


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