Do you have a 'signature-item'?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Jerome, May 30, 2011.

  1. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    So, no then?

    Signature items tend to require being in some way unique. You've described something very, very generic. Let me guess- the tie is usually red.

    .


    I would say that a specific traditional look could be enought to be "signature". I have thought of going to an all white shirt wardrobe, for instance.
     
  2. srivats

    srivats Senior member

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    I'm going to need a fit pic of these. You keep mentioning them and now I'm genuinely curious.
    I'll try and post some photos later this week. With eyeglasses, never decide on a pair based just on how it looks on screen standalone or on another person. We all have very different faces and what works for one, might not work for another. As I wrote in my eyeglasses thread, I see a LOT of people wearing ill fitting frames - perhaps OK if done for style, but a bad mistake if one is wearing prescription glasses.
     
  3. Quadcammer

    Quadcammer Senior member

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  4. softy

    softy Senior member

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    I'll try and post some photos later this week. With eyeglasses, never decide on a pair based just on how it looks on screen standalone or on another person. We all have very different faces and what works for one, might not work for another. As I wrote in my eyeglasses thread, I see a LOT of people wearing ill fitting frames - perhaps OK if done for style, but a bad mistake if one is wearing prescription glasses.

    Yes, of course. It'd be daft to not try eyeglasses on.
    I was just curious about how you are pulling these off. As mentioned in your thread, I don't do chunky glasses. Is that too personal?
     
  5. BLU8

    BLU8 Well-Known Member

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    So, no then?

    Signature items tend to require being in some way unique. You've described something very, very generic. Let me guess- the tie is usually red.


    I guess you could say that it's sort of my signature "look". The pocket square is not necessarily unique, but it's something that I wear any time I don a suit. Occasionally people will notice & comment on it.

    Maybe the micropattern ties could be considered my signature item, as they make up 99% of my tie collection. I actually don't have many red ties, only 2 or 3. Mostly different shades of blue, but also silver, dark grey, & gold.
     
  6. Klobber

    Klobber Senior member

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    My signature is a mahogany walking stick that acts like a holster for a sword. Seriously cool.

    Also there is something very agreeable about a gentleman with an umbrella or a walking stick.
     
  7. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    My underwear, I never change or wash it. Does a signature smell count?
     
  8. srivats

    srivats Senior member

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    Yes, of course. It'd be daft to not try eyeglasses on. I was just curious about how you are pulling these off. As mentioned in your thread, I don't do chunky glasses. Is that too personal?
    They only look chunky if you are used to wearing metal or rimless frames only. I don't consider mine to be in the chunky category -- there are far, far thicker frames out there that are hipster-ish and fashion-forward. I grew up watching my father and other folks wearing similar frames and to me, there is a certain nostalgia involved with wearing acetate frames. I did wear metal frames for a few years but got tired of the look. Unlike metal, it is easy to miss (as in choose a bad one for your face) with acetate. However, there are a LOT of nice ones out there and the right one will give your face a distinguished look. If you are switching from metal, there is ofcourse that period where you think it looks odd and everyone comments. After a while, you get used to it and you distinctly see the difference when you wear a metal/rimless frame. Both styles have their advantages and disadvantages and overall you should choose one that goes well with your style of dress and personality. If you don't like acetate, then so be it!
     
  9. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

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    I guess you could say that it's sort of my signature "look". The pocket square is not necessarily unique, but it's something that I wear any time I don a suit. Occasionally people will notice & comment on it.

    Maybe the micropattern ties could be considered my signature item, as they make up 99% of my tie collection. I actually don't have many red ties, only 2 or 3. Mostly different shades of blue, but also silver, dark grey, & gold.


    Well, at least you're not ultra generic. Red ties, white shirts and basic suits get awfully tiresome.

    I would say that a specific traditional look could be enought to be "signature". I have thought of going to an all white shirt wardrobe, for instance.

    I don't really think that that would do it. It may be nice for you, but a signature item, to me, is something that registers with people. It's something they notice rather than something they don't notice. They may not notice that you're always in a white shirt, since a white shirt is the default and worn by so many people with regularity. Wearing only white shirts isn't something that people would really notice. Same with the oneshoe. Nice mental masturbation for a SFer (well, a subspecies anyway), but not something that anyone is going to notice as a signature in the real world. Tie bars? That's something a step above and different, and will be processed as something that's there, rather than something that's not there. Same with a distinctive watch or glasses. Or wearing a jacket on a regular basis in texas.

    Classic dressing is getting rarer and rarer where wearing a perfectly normal classic ensemble really might be truly distinctive. In many circles these days it is. But when other people are wearing suit and tie, nothing about suit/white shirt/subtle tie is going to stand out or be remembered.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handkerchief_code

    I hope this doesn't single-handedly destroy your signature item for you.


    [​IMG]

    I'm aware of it. But I carry them as a practical item, and it's really only seen when it's being used, unless I don't get it fully shoved in the pocket. I keep 'em folded up pretty nicely and ironed, handkerchiefs in 8th sized squares and bandannas in folded in half diagonally from the same configuration, so they're neat and easy to get into the pocket all the way. I do that so they lie nice and flat and the edges are lined up, making it easy to flip from fold to fold so I don't have to blow in the same pocket twice.

    But they don't come out unless they're being used, and I don't tend to frequent gay bars, so I don't think I really run a risk of being misunderstood.
     
  10. softy

    softy Senior member

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    They only look chunky if you are used to wearing metal or rimless frames only. I don't consider mine to be in the chunky category -- there are far, far thicker frames out there that are hipster-ish and fashion-forward.

    I grew up watching my father and other folks wearing similar frames and to me, there is a certain nostalgia involved with wearing acetate frames. I did wear metal frames for a few years but got tired of the look. Unlike metal, it is easy to miss (as in choose a bad one for your face) with acetate. However, there are a LOT of nice ones out there and the right one will give your face a distinguished look. If you are switching from metal, there is ofcourse that period where you think it looks odd and everyone comments. After a while, you get used to it and you distinctly see the difference when you wear a metal/rimless frame. Both styles have their advantages and disadvantages and overall you should choose one that goes well with your style of dress and personality. If you don't like acetate, then so be it!


    I agree on all counts. I don't dislike it as a sweeping rule, I just prefer it done well on other people than on me. Maybe, as you say, I have yet to find great acetate ones that sway me. Of course I think acetate is very nice on sunglass styles. I have sunglasses in this fashion and find them fine, but I wouldn't want the same on my face.

    I tend to use color more than most and consequently like to play down ornamentation on my face. Also, I prefer the way light (say something platinum colored) metal has a clarifying and brightening effect on the face than does a darker acetate frame.

    Of course I'm suspectible to being swayed and open to experiment. That's why I asked -- there is something appealing about your C&G frames that doesn't invoke the usual revulsion I get from stuff that's in fashion right now. We're seeing a resurgence in this because it's easier to achieve a "bold" look but, as you say, hard to execute well. I think that metal requires a similar process to do well. I'm not saying I'm there, but that's my thought process.

    Maybe I need to go shopping!
     
  11. TheWraith

    TheWraith Senior member

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    Also there is something very agreeable about a gentleman with an umbrella or a walking stick.

    +1

    I often go out with my walking stick size umbrella. Sometimes I use my black, silver handled walking stick, though not so much lately.
     
  12. srivats

    srivats Senior member

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    I agree on all counts. I don't dislike it as a sweeping rule, I just prefer it done well on other people than on me. Maybe, as you say, I have yet to find great acetate ones that sway me. Of course I think acetate is very nice on sunglass styles. I have sunglasses in this fashion and find them fine, but I wouldn't want the same on my face. I tend to use color more than most and consequently like to play down ornamentation on my face. Also, I prefer the way light (say something platinum colored) metal has a clarifying and brightening effect on the face than does a darker acetate frame. Of course I'm suspectible to being swayed and open to experiment. That's why I asked -- there is something appealing about your C&G frames that doesn't invoke the usual revulsion I get from stuff that's in fashion right now. We're seeing a resurgence in this because it's easier to achieve a "bold" look but, as you say, hard to execute well. I think that metal requires a similar process to do well. I'm not saying I'm there, but that's my thought process. Maybe I need to go shopping!
    It took me quite a while before I found a pair that I really liked. If you are interested, start with Warby Parker - they have unlimited free home try-ons, 5 frames at a time with free return shipping. Zero cost to you. Some of the frames they have are great. I have their Pierce model as backup frames ... great deal for $95 (I paid extra for high index lenses). The only bad thing is that they have only one size in a model -- more often than not, I found that I'd need a different size in a model I liked. Classic Specs is another similar option with more conservative frames. They do have the sidewinder model I wear. If you want more info, PM me. Mine are Shuron btw, not Cutler and Gross [​IMG]
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I don't really think that that would do it. It may be nice for you, but a signature item, to me, is something that registers with people. It's something they notice rather than something they don't notice. .

    I am not sure - I often look around and think that nobody is wearing a plain white shirt. I think that a person that always wore a white shirt and a solid dark tie would would be noticible, for instance.
     
  14. tweedtie

    tweedtie Member

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    Actually my watch is always with me, my lighter and my cigar case!Attachment 65548
    [​IMG]
     
  15. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    I wear a monochromatic navy blue outfit about 80% of the time. Usually blue pants, white shirt, with or without a blue sweater.
     

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