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Do Cedar blocks/hangers work for moths?

CustomWorks

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How effective are cedar blocks / hangers for moths?? Worth the investment? And if so, where would be the best place to buy them and are they all the same?
 

chasingred

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I place cedar blocks in satchels and just hang them with my clothes. Some garment bags also have a small pocket inside for cedar blocks, which is great for making sure moths don't eat your suits.

Be careful, however, I've heard that cedar blocks can sometimes stain clothes. Not sure how true that is, but it's worth considering.
 

sonlegoman

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They work by hiding the smell of the wool/cashmere that moths are naturally attracted to to lay their eggs (they would normally lay eggs on an actual animal, not a sweater). The eggs then hatch and the larvae eat at the fibers. They do not repel moths and moths are not repulsed by the smell of cedar. If the moth by chance finds your sweaters, then they'll find it an lay their eggs. I guess the idea is to reduce the chances of finding the smell of animal fibers.
 

CustomWorks

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Originally Posted by sonlegoman
They work by hiding the smell of the wool/cashmere that moths are naturally attracted to to lay their eggs (they would normally lay eggs on an actual animal, not a sweater). The eggs then hatch and the larvae eat at the fibers. They do not repel moths and moths are not repulsed by the smell of cedar. If the moth by chance finds your sweaters, then they'll find it an lay their eggs. I guess the idea is to reduce the chances of finding the smell of animal fibers.

AH! useful thanks..

do you know if they are attracted to colgone/perfume like smells?
 

porcelain monkey

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That is an interesting explanation of cedar, but my understanding is that there is no real evidence as to why it works in keeping moths out, but it does. What it does not do is kill the eggs if they are already there. For what it's worth, my pest control guy told me that cedar is effective.
 

sonlegoman

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Originally Posted by CustomWorks
AH! useful thanks.. do you know if they are attracted to colgone/perfume like smells?
They are invertebrates with simple neural systems. They smell things like sweat, blood, and animal smells. If these were flower-based insects, then yes. But they are not. Crickets will also eat through anything, even wool, silk, cotton. They are attracted to molasses since they will also eat anything sweet. Some moths dislike lemon peel. Quick online search shows lavender and mint appear to repeal moths. Not sure how true that is.
Originally Posted by porcelain monkey
That is an interesting explanation of cedar, but my understanding is that there is no real evidence as to why it works in keeping moths out, but it does. What it does not do is kill the eggs if they are already there. For what it's worth, my pest control guy told me that cedar is effective.
It does not repel moths. Simply masks the smell of wool and animal fibers. Go into a cedar forest and you will probably find moths and insects as long as there are occasional deer, sheep, animals, etc.
 

CustomWorks

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Originally Posted by chasingred
I place cedar blocks in satchels and just hang them with my clothes. Some garment bags also have a small pocket inside for cedar blocks, which is great for making sure moths don't eat your suits.

Be careful, however, I've heard that cedar blocks can sometimes stain clothes. Not sure how true that is, but it's worth considering.


I heard they could stain as well, wonder why that is..
 

sonlegoman

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Originally Posted by CustomWorks
I heard they could stain as well, wonder why that is..

Some of these poorly made products are artificially stained to produce a nice color. I bought a few and they stained especially when the shirt was still damp. I wouldn't use cedar hangers. Just put cedar blocks.
 

CustomWorks

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Originally Posted by sonlegoman
Some of these poorly made products are artificially stained to produce a nice color. I bought a few and they stained especially when the shirt was still damp. I wouldn't use cedar hangers. Just put cedar blocks.

Where do you place your cedar blocks in your closet? Assuming these things may stain, i'm guessing none of the blocks actually touch your sweaters?
 

sonlegoman

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mothballs are toxic if exposure is long enough. It is in essence an artificial chemical. What is wrong with lavender?
 

CustomWorks

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Originally Posted by sonlegoman
mothballs are toxic if exposure is long enough. It is in essence an artificial chemical. What is wrong with lavender?

any recommended brands for the blocks?? or are they all the same?

btw, where do u place your blocks if you said they could potientally stain, im assuming they don't touch any of your clothes then?
 

F. Corbera

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The only thing that works reliably is to (1) have clothes cleaned, (2) have tailored clothes properly handpressed, and (3) store in air-permeable but sealed covers, like a good garment bag.

Otherwise, brushing regularly comes close.
 

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