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DIY Indian food

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Dewey, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    Can anyone recommend a cookbook for Americans making Indian food?

    Not Native American food but Indian food: saag paneer, aloo gobi, lamb sagwala, etc. I'm especially interested in the meateater dishes & the ones that use dairy products. But I love the vegetables too and will read anything that's highly recommended. Thanks.
     
  2. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    The Madhur Jaffrey books are supposed to be quite popular.

    I dont cook much Indian at home as I like a range of dishes during a meal and find it a bit of a pain to prepare so many things.

    I think technique plays a large part in the cooking, so might be worth watching some of the videos on you tube for preparing spices / etc...

    K
     
  3. oscarthewild

    oscarthewild Senior member

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    + 1 on Madhur Jaffery

    Sameen Rushdie (Salmans sister) is also pretty good.

    Once you have the flavours down, the Julie Sahni recipes have pretty good directions too.

    -
     
  4. SantosLHalper

    SantosLHalper Senior member

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    I've had great success with Classic Indian Cooking by Julie Sahni. Not much experience with the Jaffrey books, but friends have recommended them as well.
     
  5. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    I have this Madhur Jaffrey's book and use it a lot. The directions are easy to follow, the ingredients, techniques and cookware are adopted to what is available in the US and there is a good overview of spices. [​IMG]
     
  6. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    Thank you styleforum -- these are great leads & they are all much appreciated.
     
  7. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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  8. feynmix

    feynmix Senior member

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  9. Cupcake

    Cupcake New Member

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  10. clarksdb

    clarksdb Senior member

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    Indian food is just bad. If you want to taste really good South Asian food then I suggest Pakistani food (biryani, nihari, haleem). SO DAMN GOOD.
     
  11. akatsuki

    akatsuki Senior member

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  12. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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    Biryani, originated in South India. Well done.
     
  13. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    I love how you bumped a three-year-old thread to correct a one-year-old misatke.
     
  14. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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    It's good to correct mistakes, regardless.

    Besides, you don't mess with our food.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2011
    1 person likes this.
  15. sellahi22

    sellahi22 Senior member

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    Would it make sense to draw the line between Muslim and non-Muslim rather than Pakistani vs Indian? The meat dishes I've had as "Pakistani" restaurants, particularly of the ghetto cab driver variety in SF/NYC or Tayyabs or Lahore Kabab House in London, have been far superior to anything I've had at any Indian places, low end or high end. Also I frequent a takeaway owned by a big fat Sikh guy that serves Halal meat, which surprised me because I thought Sikhs are forbidden to eat Halal or Kosher meat. The guy said that he is only down with South Asian food done in the Pakistani style, and that other South Asians don't understand meat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
  16. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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    Sikhs are not allowed to eat halal meat.

    Tandoori style chicken for instance was invented by a Hindu Punjabi called Gujral who cooked meats in the clay oven instead of the usualy flat breads. This is a very popular dish in the USA while curries are most popular in the UK. Also curries are typical Indian dishes and have not been introduced by 'foreigners' in history.

    Now, the Indian style from Hyderabad and the Mughlai cuisine are very popular in the west. Both cuisines reached their peak in India. Sure Mughal style cuisine was introduced by central Asians but Indian style spices were added, and their culinary level reached their peaks in India. Then there's a similar style which is called Awadhi cuisine from the city of Lucknow which is also regarded in high respect for their meats cooked slowly. These 3 types are copied many times by Pakistani restaurants, while basically originated or perfected in India in the cities or places mentioned.
     
  17. sellahi22

    sellahi22 Senior member

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    I have no arguments with your history, just saying that I have been more impressed by restaurants claiming to cook either in the Pakistani (esp Lahori) style or the Mughlai style (which also has a Muslim heritage) than restaurants associated with any other part of the Subcontinent. South Asian is far and away my favorite ethnic cuisine, and I make a point of checking out the top South Asian spots, high end and low end, in any city I visit. I haven't had anything as delicious as Tayyabs orLahore Kabab House in London, and the closest are a few Pakistani taxi driver takeaways in SF, NYC, and Chicago. Just my humble opinion.
     
  18. IndianBoyz

    IndianBoyz Senior member

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    The top UK South Asian restaurants are run by Indians, but hey, if you like Lahori food, good for you. Pakistani food has not Muslim heritage besides the obvious Mughal style influence. Basically there isn't much difference, but you seem to be a muslim ofcourse you're going to favour them as you need to eat halal food.
     
  19. sellahi22

    sellahi22 Senior member

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    Have some Muslim blood but not South Asian, and don't care about Halal or not. Just stating my opinions on the best South Asian food I've tried. What are the "top UK South Asian restaurants" in your view? I guess the Michelin starred ones (Amaya, Tamarind, etc) are probably Indian-owned, but frankly I find posh Indian food to be really boring. The cuisine is just not suited to that sort of presentation (Oysters with curry sauce, etc).

    The best Indian restaurants IMO are the vegetarian ones (paneer, dal, spinach, eggplant) or street food ones (dosas, chat, samosas). Also, Indian places tend to be better at creamy sauces like Chicken Makhni, but I'm not a fan of those dishes in any event.
     
  20. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    I have the Sahni book and it is great, only thing is it focuses more on Northern Indian cuisine which is quite different from Southern. I prefer the searing hotness of the southern Indian cuisine. I have one of Jaffrey's books and it is great, because it has dishes by region, so you can see how the flavors vary around the country. My favorite is a South Indian cookbook though, forget the name. If you are wanting to try a sampling of different regions, go with one of Jaffrey's for starters.
     

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