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Discussions about the fashion industry thread

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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I’ll take automation seriously when they can automate a bespoke quality suit.
A member on this board is actually working on just that. I saw some photos of the results and it's impressively good.
 

King Calder

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Fascinating. This guy just did an interview on the Odd Lots Bloomberg podcast which was really interesting.

this is to say, there seems to be low hanging fruit that policmakers should be doing to try to help here, that clearly isn’t happening. So not all just about consumer demand.
 
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cb200

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Weird and amazing that this happened so fast after the tweets and recommendation made.
 

Zamb

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that bar sounds kind randomly too high?
No,
Because im
Not interested in basic clothing that is easy to replicate. Of course there are certain things like making Patterson cutting large amounts of garments that it makes perfect sense to automate.
I’m a stickler for efficiency and support that as long as it does not diminish the quality of the aesthetic beauty of the product.
A bespoke suit is a good example of something that needs human skill that isn’t easy to replicate with a machine.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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A bespoke suit is a good example of something that needs human skill that isn’t easy to replicate with a machine.
We were just having this convo in another thread about pad stitching.



Pad stitching by hand



Pad stitching by machine


 
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clee1982

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No,
Because im
Not interested in basic clothing that is easy to replicate. Of course there are certain things like making Patterson cutting large amounts of garments that it makes perfect sense to automate.
I’m a stickler for efficiency and support that as long as it does not diminish the quality of the aesthetic beauty of the product.
A bespoke suit is a good example of something that needs human skill that isn’t easy to replicate with a machine.
kind talking pass each other.

I'm sure there are things can't be done automatically (for now), but there are a lot can be done. Point being bespoke is not a representative of the garment/textile industry, don't think automation is a threat to bespoke/artisans product yet, but if automation is a threat to 80% of the guys who are currently being employed in the textile industry then that sounds disruptive enough to me, then we go to the creative destruction argument, and how much is machine helping thus increase output vs. outright replacing etc., though point being measure automation on bespoke as an overall "threat' to the labor in that industry is probably kind not what I'm thinking about
 

Zamb

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kind talking pass each other.

I'm sure there are things can't be done automatically (for now), but there are a lot can be done. Point being bespoke is not a representative of the garment/textile industry, don't think automation is a threat to bespoke/artisans product yet, but if automation is a threat to 80% of the guys who are currently being employed in the textile industry then that sounds disruptive enough to me, then we go to the creative destruction argument, and how much is machine helping thus increase output vs. outright replacing etc., though point being measure automation on bespoke as an overall "threat' to the labor in that industry is probably kind not what I'm thinking about
I’m not against automation. I can make buttonholes by hand. My good friend GBS does on all of his clothes.
I make all my buttonholes by machine.
If a machine offers the quality and efficiency that is better than humans, without compromising the aesthetics of the product, then machine it is.
I’m just simply saying that from my experience and research, one of the reasons automation has not taken root in fashion is that soft goods are not easy to automate.
Also the areas where you can, you loose a lot of the aesthetic beauty that makes the thing special.
 

cb200

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Interesting story about "ghost brands" in apparel. Points to an odd consequences of lowering costs to branding and merchandising online. Easy to show a simulation of a real brand (whatever that might mean, but I think that's sort of in question) with little cost and see if it can draw in some dollars.

The artist / author Jenny Odell is mentioned. If you haven't read it and have time, I'd recommend her article on free watches.

 

Zamb

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Interesting story about "ghost brands" in apparel. Points to an odd consequences of lowering costs to branding and merchandising online. Easy to show a simulation of a real brand (whatever that might mean, but I think that's sort of in question) with little cost and see if it can draw in some dollars.

The artist / author Jenny Odell is mentioned. If you haven't read it and have time, I'd recommend her article on free watches.

many of them are buying "blanks" doing "drop shipping" and all kind of nonsense
I dont remember the name of the company, but there was a huge hoopla about a year ago of a company selling puffer jackets that it was found out you could get the exact same ones on aliExpress for about a third of the price and not with their label
 

JohnAAG

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The story behind the Rogue Territory Supply Jacket is an interesting example of this. James Bond wore it in the new movie and it was featured in some of the promotional photos, so it was identified by Bond fans pretty quickly and the info was shared around. As a result, RgT saw a healthy growth in interest in their company from lots of new potential customers.

Pretty soon after (mid 2019) a copy shows up on Amazon from some brand called Maden for $89. It's there for a 3 or 4 months before it gets pulled. But it continues be offered on Ebay for around $52. And on AliExpress for $42.

And now the same jacket is back on Amazon for $88.99 from some company called Omoone. Same product pics, but they've blurred out the neck tag.

Some pics for comparison
Original RgT
RgT jacket.jpg


On Amazon
Amazon jacket 1.jpg
Amazon jacket 2.jpg


On Ebay
Ebay Jacket.jpg


AliExpress
AliExpress Jacket.jpg



I see this kind of thing all the time and not just with clothing. For example, a lot of the furniture you see on Wayfair (and other places like Raymor and Flanigan) can be found for less on AliExpress. It happens with luggage, electronics, garden furniture, etc. It's the whole FBA model that's now being used almost everywhere online.
 

smittycl

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The story behind the Rogue Territory Supply Jacket is an interesting example of this. James Bond wore it in the new movie and it was featured in some of the promotional photos, so it was identified by Bond fans pretty quickly and the info was shared around. As a result, RgT saw a healthy growth in interest in their company from lots of new potential customers.

Pretty soon after (mid 2019) a copy shows up on Amazon from some brand called Maden for $89. It's there for a 3 or 4 months before it gets pulled. But it continues be offered on Ebay for around $52. And on AliExpress for $42.

And now the same jacket is back on Amazon for $88.99 from some company called Omoone. Same product pics, but they've blurred out the neck tag.

Some pics for comparison
Original RgT
View attachment 1692460

On Amazon
View attachment 1692461 View attachment 1692462

On Ebay
View attachment 1692463

AliExpress
View attachment 1692464


I see this kind of thing all the time and not just with clothing. For example, a lot of the furniture you see on Wayfair (and other places like Raymor and Flanigan) can be found for less on AliExpress. It happens with luggage, electronics, garden furniture, etc. It's the whole FBA model that's now being used almost everywhere online.
Seems like by now Internet-savvy folks should know when something is too good to be true.
 
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JohnAAG

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Seems like by now Internet-savvy folks should know when something is too good to be true.
The article @cb200 shared gives a good overview of the strategy. But this isn't anything new and it certainly didn't start with Instagram becoming popular (although I have no doubt it helped accelerate the trend). You can find anything you can think of on Alibaba and setting up a drop shipping company is pretty easy. So it all comes down to the marketing and the channels you want to use. I had an acquaintance that was doing the whole FBA thing back in 2008 or 09.

Edit to add: you can get that RgT jacket rip-off on Alibaba for as low as $24.50/unit if you buy in bulk.
 

Reginald Bartholomew

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Maden are one of the many Americana-ish clothing manufacturers based in and mostly selling to China, on the low cost end of the Bronson/Sauce Zhan thing, who have been trying to make inroads into other markets. Their stuff is cheap but actually surprisingly well made. Generally they are shit at design, and as a result their knockoffs or closer to straight repro stuff are the best things they make. They have made similar waxed cotton looking things in the past (I have handled a waxed cotton puffy parka they made that was far too well made for it's absurdly low cost), so it probably wasn't hard for them to pivot to knocking it off.
 

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