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Delicious Wines

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by itsstillmatt, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Terlato cab is pretty good.
     
  2. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    some of their american wines are very good. they own many wineries now.
     
  3. coolpapa

    coolpapa Senior member

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    i'm with my little round buddy on this one. but we may be talking at cross-purposes. Are California wines generally a good bargain? no. But are there good bargains in California? Sure. And are those bargains usually blends? I think so.

    I agree with this. There are some good cheap blends from CA and what generally makes them good is that they aren't "California-ized" what with wood chip treatments, etc. I remember when BV Rutherford was $12 and was an awesome wine, along with Beringer Knights Valley, and Mondavi Napa. All were solid, well made wines that were great expressions of Napa cab without being oaked to death, or with 16% alcohol. Ahh, those were the good old days. These days when I'm looking for value, I look to Italy and France.
     
  4. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    A local wine shop turned me onto a rose Cremant d'Alsace from Allimant Laugner made from 100 percent pinot noir that is really delicious. Only $20. It looks like K&L has it for mail-order, too.

    --Andre
     
  5. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    A local wine shop turned me onto a rose Cremant d'Alsace from Allimant Laugner made from 100 percent pinot noir that is really delicious. Only $20. It looks like K&L has it for mail-order, too.

    --Andre


    nice, underappreciated category.
     
  6. Mark from Plano

    Mark from Plano Senior member

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    Picked up a Tavel Rose tonight. Will be looking for an opportunity to quaff my ass off.
     
  7. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

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    Picked up a Tavel Rose tonight. Will be looking for an opportunity to quaff my ass off.

    I love how incredibly dry these are.
     
  8. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    nice, underappreciated category.

    LOL thanks. I actually read that article right after I posted, and went "Doh!" But, yeah, definitely underappreciated.

    --Andre
     
  9. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

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    I've been drinking mostly (only?) Portuguese wines from the Douro and Dao regions lately. Fantastic QPR, every time.
     
  10. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    I've been getting a lot of mileage out of cheap New Zealand Sauv Blancs, especially in warm weather (which I had tonight with my wine in Dallas). There is a strong family resemblance from bottle to bottle -they all seem to taste of green apple and fresh dill.

    You should also try their Pinot Noir, Otargo region ones are drinking very well at present.

    Myself had a bottle of Bay of Fires Tasmanian Pinot Noir, last night wonderful on the palate a gem to drink.

    Gravel Pit Shiraz Viognier not too plumby or jammy as I have found some S/V of late, very easy drinking wine with a lot of depth, good back palate. Other wise Laughing Magpie a consistently good S/V.
     
  11. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    I've been drinking mostly (only?) Portuguese wines from the Douro and Dao regions lately. Fantastic QPR, every time.

    I've recently learned that even in Pennsylvania (where wine & liquor is sold only at state stores), a pretty decent Douro only costs about $10.
     
  12. braised

    braised Senior member

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    OK, we're on summer wines.

    Rose is good, but when the heat comes I love the southern French wines made from the regional grapes. Think Colombard and Ugni Blanc.

    Domaine La Salette, although cheap at under $10 a bottle, is light and bright. And more than $30 the last time I saw it, Domaine Ott rings in as the heavy weight in the category. You can have the Rose, I want the Blanc de Blanc (Semillon and Ugni Blanc).

    B
     
  13. eg1

    eg1 Senior member

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    When I look for cheap reds, I generally stick to Italy and South America. YMMV.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    While I just about completely agree with Manton on the whole CA = single varietal thing and that the AOC was a codification of tradition, not the other way 'round as someone has posited, I would note that the Paso area is making some very good Rhone style blends.
     
  15. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?
     
  16. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?
    I think this but I don't have much experience with them.
     
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?

    I think it is a form of short hand. As some of you know better than I, 21 grapes are sanctioned for use when Rhone is looked at in total. However, many areas have a far smaller number of grapes proscribed for use, with I think, even a few appellations only allowing one grape. Then subdivide that roughly into northern (Syrah based) and southern (Grenache based) and you have a butt load of different blends going on.

    So my suspicion is it's used as short hand for, "A blended wine that could be made from these grapes in Rhone" but eliminates potential consumer confusion over all the different grape varietals that could be used.

    I've also noticed a fairly recent trend where a brand identification is being attempted for the so-called "GSM" wines, make of Grenache, Syrah, and Mouvedre.

    IMO, it would seem to me the Paso area would be tailor made for making lush, southern Rhone type blends. The Booker and Saxxum I've tasted support this.
     
  18. Mark from Plano

    Mark from Plano Senior member

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  19. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    It's all about the garrigue. [​IMG]
     
  20. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    lame question I suppose - but what exactly does "rhone style blend" mean? Is it just code for using syrah and grenache as major components in the blend, or do the flavor profiles have a tendency to mimic the Hermitages, Cote-Roties, and Chateaneufs of the Rhone region?

    i'm not exactly sure what the question means, really. no offense. certainly rhone grhapes, but also, i think, a certain rhone style as well. there are cali syrahs that taste nothing like rhone and don't play that game at all. the question then becomes whether the "rhone rangers" are making rhone wines that have failed (don't taste the same as the originals), or whether they're making wines -- some of them pretty good -- that are "inspired by" the flavors of the rhone. just as cabs may be "inspired by" bordeaux, but don't taste just like them, and pinots are "inspired by" burgundy, without tasting just like them. or, for that matter, american "italian" food (even the "authentic" stuff) and "french" food isn't exactly the same.
    rather than asking whether it tastes like Rayas, it's probably more interesting to ask whether it tastes good.
     

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