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Delicious Wines

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by itsstillmatt, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. highball

    highball Senior member

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    O'Reilly's Pinot Gris - $16

    This wine is made by Owen Roe under their private label, great value and incredibly drinkable. Not only does the QPR make me happy but it brings back memories of my visit to Owen Roe in the summer of 2009 which was a great experience. Highly recommend it for those visiting the Willamette.


    Have you had any of the O'Reilly's Pinot Noirs? I have a bottle of the '07 and the '09 right now just waiting to be drunk. I tasted the '06 i think it was a couple years back and it was amazing for the price but I've heard the subsequent vintages were not quite as good. Guess i will find out soon enough...
     


  2. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Hermann J. Wiemer Fingerlakes Riesling. Also sub-$20. Single vineyards are around $35.
     


  3. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    Hermann J. Wiemer Fingerlakes Riesling. Also sub-$20. Single vineyards are around $35.

    +1
     


  4. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Good cru Beaujolais is very pleasurable, or even lower-ranked Beaujolais from a fine year. And we've had a few recently.

    One of the categories that is not only delicious on its own terms but also great if you care to think about it is Mosel Riesling Spatlese. I prefer the slightly racy years, like 2001. Mozart wine! If I catch myself taking self-inventory at the end of the year, it's really the only wine that makes me think I haven't been drinking enough.

    JJ Prum makes a very reliable line of Rieslings. Wehlener Sonnenuhr and Graacher Himmelreich seem to be his biggest products. Scharzhofbergers in general are very fine, and Egon Muller's Scharzhofberger is especially worth looking for, although it will cost you.
     


  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    I've been getting a lot of mileage out of cheap New Zealand Sauv Blancs, especially in warm weather (which I had tonight with my wine in Dallas). There is a strong family resemblance from bottle to bottle -they all seem to taste of green apple and fresh dill.

    +1.
     


  6. james_timothy

    james_timothy Senior member

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    DiSefano wines from Washington State: each time I approach them with some skepticism, and each time I think: this is just great. The latest was a 2006 Meritage that was all about freshness and vitality. $15.
     


  7. Axelman 17

    Axelman 17 Senior member

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    Have you had any of the O'Reilly's Pinot Noirs? I have a bottle of the '07 and the '09 right now just waiting to be drunk. I tasted the '06 i think it was a couple years back and it was amazing for the price but I've heard the subsequent vintages were not quite as good. Guess i will find out soon enough...

    Have not had the O'Reilly's pinot noir, definitely would be curious how it is. That said, I have enjoyed a number of the Owen Roe reds that I have tried including Sinister Hand and Ex Umbris.
     


  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I've been getting a lot of mileage out of cheap New Zealand Sauv Blancs, especially in warm weather (which I had tonight with my wine in Dallas). There is a strong family resemblance from bottle to bottle -they all seem to taste of green apple and fresh dill.

    I have a similar reaction to most Albarino (different flavor profile of course).
     


  9. Kyoung05

    Kyoung05 Senior member

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    Good cru Beaujolais is very pleasurable, or even lower-ranked Beaujolais from a fine year. And we've had a few recently.

    One of the categories that is not only delicious on its own terms but also great if you care to think about it is Mosel Riesling Spatlese. I prefer the slightly racy years, like 2001. Mozart wine! If I catch myself taking self-inventory at the end of the year, it's really the only wine that makes me think I haven't been drinking enough.

    JJ Prum makes a very reliable line of Rieslings. Wehlener Sonnenuhr and Graacher Himmelreich seem to be his biggest products. Scharzhofbergers in general are very fine, and Egon Muller's Scharzhofberger is especially worth looking for, although it will cost you.


    +1. Riesling pairs wonderfully with spicy food, i.e. Thai, which makes it all the better.
     


  10. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    been gone for a few days with the flu. thanks for the kind words. there's always a tension when this kind of discussion begins between hyper-intellectualizing and "whatever you like is good" and i think we've avoided that well. it's funny. great wine can be an intellectual experience on the level of any great art. but i think what's happened lately (ahem, 20 years or so) is that the market has become so focused on buying what they think of as great art, without really understanding what greatness is, that things have gotten skewed. i taste so many supposedly "great" wines these days that kind of run down the checklist of greatness attributes -- ripeness, extraction, richness, depth of fruit -- but that don't seem to add up to much. going back to pleasurable -- smile-able -- wines is a reminder of what balance means.
    my list: cru beaujolais (again, if you haven't bought in 09s, do ... immediatley). chianti normale, barbera (perhaps most of all), chinon, riesling (maybe most of all) sancerre (i love reverdy ... bought it the first time because i instantly wanted to write a detective novel where the hero was named hypolite reverdy). but my everyday, all-time pleasurable whites come from California -- I love the alsatian-style whites from Navarro in the Anderson Valley, and it seems that no matter who i pour them for, they do to. gewurtz, pg, sauvignon blanc, riesling ... these are lovely wines, made by terrific people and they cost less than $20 a bottle.
     


  11. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    great wine can be an intellectual experience on the level of any great art. but i think what's happened lately (ahem, 20 years or so) is that the market has become so focused on buying what they think of as great art, without really understanding what greatness is, that things have gotten skewed.
    the only wines I've had that I'd attach this level of greatness have all been old. Age, IMO, adds a distinct character that cannot be replicated. Perhaps I'm off in my thinking (I'd add Dagueneau to an exceptions list).
     


  12. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    age will qualify a wine that has the necessary attributes, but it's not going to do anything for a wine that doesn't. and great wines don't necessarily age (just as aged wines aren't necessarily great).
    i think dageneau is a perfect example of a wine that should be drunk fairly soon that definitely qualifies as great. nicolas Joly is another. old rieslings can certainly be great, but so can young ones, check out loosen. and i think most champagnes should be drunk young, though the exceptions are certainly stunning.
    i guess partly it comes down to what do you mean by "great"? i would put a vietti barbera scarrone up against any red wine of the same vintage and you tell me which one you like the best
     


  13. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    all valid points. I haven't had a Joly in a while, now I need to become reacquainted.

    I've had plenty of great wines, but in my post I was thinking about a few indelible examples.
     


  14. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    I've had plenty of great wines, but in my post I was thinking about a few indelible examples.

    that's a good point. context is important. but i think it's really important to remember that stand-up tastings (the way most of us first experience a wine we're going to buy) are not necessarily the best ways to judge a wine.
     


  15. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    that's a good point. context is important. but i think it's really important to remember that stand-up tastings (the way most of us first experience a wine we're going to buy) are not necessarily the best ways to judge a wine.

    Yes- especially given how those wines are served, the atmosphere and the lack of food pairing, frankly, as I tend to be on the side of "it's how it pairs with food that matters". I've yet to open and enjoy a bottle with no accompaniment. <- which is probably an interesting threak unto its own.
     


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