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Deep question on Work & Life

longskate88

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Preface: I'm a student, looking toward being a CPA, but questioning my career choice, money, and work/life in general. What are your thoughts on how your work affects you personality? If you have a boring accounting job, do you become boring? On the flip side, does a boring job actually motivate you to be adventurous and exciting outside of work, craving excitement to offset the dull work environment? What do you do the day you wake up and realize you hate your job? What if that's EVERY morning? What are some good jobs with which one can escape the rat-race or gain some satisfaction? I picture being a police officer, firefighter, nurse, etc. as being emotionally rewarding, moreso than a business related job. Does anyone know a good place to take one of those Job Placement tests, that pick good careers for you? Are they accurate? I'm feeling pretty
right now, I hope to start a serious discussion with some words of wisdom. Thanks guys
I see/know too many people working jobs they hate to make money to buy things they don't need to try and fill the void caused by dissatisfaction with their life/job/whatever. (quote Fight Club, LOL). Is that how the world works? To sum it all up, I think I'm a passionate, happy person currently. Is the world after college the soul-crushing, numbing machine it can seem to be at times from this side of the fence?
 

Taxler

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Think of your first job as a gateway to the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. Cultivate your interest, build relationships within the business world, and when the opportunity presents itself, move on to something more preferable.
 

Joffrey

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Don't put too much thought into your first job. First do you like accounting in general? If so, you will be fine. Get that first job, meet people, make some money and focus on getting experience. Stick around for 1-2 years then make your next move.

Me? I stuck through a job I hated for two years before switching a few weeks ago. The pay sucked and the company is a joke. The only things that made it tolerable were that I was very good at it, I liked the field (international trade policy) and I had cool co-workers: we were all within a few years of each other and had a good time on and off work hours. I don't regret the time spent because I was able to trade up the experience I gained into a much stronger position and I had the opportunitiy to make friends with some good people. If I left a year earlier, [with hindsight] I wouldn't be able to say the same. Plus having two years of stability after graduating college looks great on the resume.
 

Roger Mellie

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The question that would be more important to me is how my personality will suit the job I am in. Networking, leadership and communication were all things that held me back because I didn't have the right personality for the field I chose. Not what you asked, but worth considering.
 

Joffrey

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I really don't see why personality would matter in accounting. At the entry level (in a big firm) you won't be getting clients so if you are shy and a bit a awkward that won't be a big deal for the forseeable future.
 

longskate88

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Originally Posted by Jodum5
I really don't see why personality would matter in accounting. At the entry level (in a big firm) you won't be getting clients so if you are shy and a bit a awkward that won't be a big deal for the forseeable future.

I was actually hoping to combine some sort of interaction with people into the accounting job, since I do like to talk to people. I'm more worried about staying sane when sitting at a desk for 10 hours a day.

In a normal accounting firm, can you wear an iPod while at your desk? Dumb question, but I'm very serious about it, it might help pass the time while working, you know?
 

nate10184

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Especially in this economy take the sure thing and make some money. Build a capital base for the first year or two (ie don't go blow your paycheck at the bars every month) and then you will be able to operate from a position of financial strength if you decide you hate it. I think accountants make decent $ so you shouldn't have a problem doing this.

Additionally doesn't accounting give you a lot of freedom in deciding where you live? If you work with fun people in a fun place I don't think a boring job is going to ruin your life. Take a job in a college town like Austin and I guarantee you won't hate life.
 

longskate88

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Originally Posted by Taxler
Think of your first job as a gateway to the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. Cultivate your interest, build relationships within the business world, and when the opportunity presents itself, move on to something more preferable.

Thanks. I think people at my age get to thinking that they'll have that single job for the next 30 years, and it gets overwhelming. I think the accounting degree will be versatile enough to allow some movement, hopefully.

If all else fails, I'll lift some weights for a few months and go join the CHP or city police
 

Joffrey

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My last job allowed us to wear headphones while working. I loved it because I could drown out the other folks' conversations and such. I don't it so much at my new job [yet]. Plus it does look a little silly.
 

Droog

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All I can say is that you shouldn't feel trapped, now or in middle age. You don't want to be one of those men who lives a life of quiet desperation.

I had a similar dilemma. I was on a full fellowship to be a clinical psychologist in a prestigious program, had gotten the masters, and was a half year into my Ph.D. I had never wanted to be an academic but, rather, was inclined to being a psychotherapist. When I started to do psychotherapy in grad school, I realized it wasn't for me, and I was tired of school anyway.

I then had an epiphany over the course of a couple minutes that went something like: "I hate this. . . . I don't have to do this. . . . Then what will I do? . . . Join the army."

The next day I went to my local recruiter and enlisted for officer candidate school about six months later. One of the best decisions I ever made. I stayed in for 22 years.

Strangely, I have been able to apply my psych training usefully and tangibly in my army and now current position in the defense industry.
 

longskate88

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Originally Posted by Droog
All I can say is that you shouldn't feel trapped, now or in middle age. You don't want to be one of those men who lives a life of quiet desperation.

I had a similar dilemma. I was on a full fellowship to be a clinical psychologist in a prestigious program, had gotten the masters, and was a half year into my Ph.D. I had never wanted to be an academic but, rather, was inclined to being a psychotherapist. When I started to do psychotherapy in grad school, I realized it wasn't for me, and I was tired of school anyway.

I then had an epiphany over the course of a couple minutes that went something like: "I hate this. . . . I don't have to do this. . . . Then what will I do? . . . Join the army."

The next day I went to my local recruiter and enlisted for officer candidate school about six months later. One of the best decisions I ever made. I stayed in for 22 years.

Strangely, I have been able to apply my psych training usefully and tangibly in my army and now current position in the defense industry.


Thanks for the story! I might end up doing the same thing, except to the police dept. The pay will be similar to accounting in the CHP, and it seems like a satisfying career with good benefits.

It might not be the career my family or GF want to see, but in the end I don't want to have lived someone elses life.

I've gone on ride-alongs with the PD, I think the next step is to intern at an accounting firm, that should be the thing to knock me off the fence.
 

Bhowie

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Originally Posted by Droog
All I can say is that you shouldn't feel trapped, now or in middle age. You don't want to be one of those men who lives a life of quiet desperation.

I had a similar dilemma. I was on a full fellowship to be a clinical psychologist in a prestigious program, had gotten the masters, and was a half year into my Ph.D. I had never wanted to be an academic but, rather, was inclined to being a psychotherapist. When I started to do psychotherapy in grad school, I realized it wasn't for me, and I was tired of school anyway.

I then had an epiphany over the course of a couple minutes that went something like: "I hate this. . . . I don't have to do this. . . . Then what will I do? . . . Join the army."

The next day I went to my local recruiter and enlisted for officer candidate school about six months later. One of the best decisions I ever made. I stayed in for 22 years.

Strangely, I have been able to apply my psych training usefully and tangibly in my army and now current position in the defense industry.



The great thing about this forum is that everyone is from such different backgrounds. It's nice to see so many different points of view and hear interesting life stories.
 

HatMagnet

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Originally Posted by Droog
All I can say is that you shouldn't feel trapped, now or in middle age. You don't want to be one of those men who lives a life of quiet desperation.

I had a similar dilemma. I was on a full fellowship to be a clinical psychologist in a prestigious program, had gotten the masters, and was a half year into my Ph.D. I had never wanted to be an academic but, rather, was inclined to being a psychotherapist. When I started to do psychotherapy in grad school, I realized it wasn't for me, and I was tired of school anyway.

I then had an epiphany over the course of a couple minutes that went something like: "I hate this. . . . I don't have to do this. . . . Then what will I do? . . . Join the army."

The next day I went to my local recruiter and enlisted for officer candidate school about six months later. One of the best decisions I ever made. I stayed in for 22 years.

Strangely, I have been able to apply my psych training usefully and tangibly in my army and now current position in the defense industry.



Good post Droog! I did much the same thing after having jobs I absolutely hated,one day I went over to the army recruiter's office on my lunch hour and after thinking it over I signed up the next day. I retired after 20 of the best years of my life and was lucky enough afterwards to get a job with the Fire Department which what I always wanted to do anyway. Now I look forward to going to work and I'm much happier at 48 than I ever was in my 20's.
The point to this rambling is this longskate88, don't be discouraged by the way things may appear right now,you've got a hell of an interesting journey ahead of you,take the time to enjoy the experiences happening now and the ones to come. Life tends to get better as it unfolds.
 

grimslade

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It depends.
 

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