DB Tuxedo - Flapped or Jetted Pockets?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Quirk, Aug 16, 2006.

  1. Quirk

    Quirk Senior member

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    I was evaluating my old tuxedo recently for the first time in a while, and found I no longer appreciated the jetted pockets. When I did a search here, I was extremely surprised to find that the few comments I found indicated a distinct preference for jetted vs. flapped pockets on a tuxedo. But on this DB for example (it's not mine), I think the flapped pockets look far better than jetted would.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Am I alone on this?
     
  2. thinman

    thinman Senior member

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    I believe "The Rules" specify that only jetted pockets are appropriate on a tuxedo. I'm willing to be corrected by those with more knowledge/experience than I.
     
  3. Edward Appleby

    Edward Appleby Senior member

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    Why couldn't one just tuck the flap pockets?

    Although, in abstract, I do agree that jetted looks better simply because it's sleeker. Same reason you don't get ticket pockets on DJs.
     
  4. kitonbrioni

    kitonbrioni Senior member

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  5. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't care for jetted pockets in general, but am a traditionalist when it comes to dinner jackets. As such, no flaps.
     
  6. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Dinner jacket pockets do not have flaps unless they also have notched lapels. In other words, a style no-no.
     
  7. summej2

    summej2 Senior member

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    Dinner jacket pockets do not have flaps unless they also have notched lapels. In other words, a style no-no.

    My American RTW dinner jacket is from 1932 and is in all respects standard: peak lapel, no vent, with the exception of it having flapped pockets. This may, however, be due to its being only a # 2 or 3 grade suit and flapped pockets being cheaper to manufacture.
     
  8. Quirk

    Quirk Senior member

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    Interesting. Rules notwithstanding, I'm a little surprised that so many people feel that the pictured DJ would look better with jetted pockets. Flapped pockets just seem more 'classic' to me for some reason. Particularly on a DB, where they lend some visual counterbalance to the prominent lapels. I can understand the premise of seeking the sleekest possible look, but in that instance, I think I'd probably just opt for an SB.

    Anyway, thanks for the opinions.

    My American RTW dinner jacket is from 1932 and is in all respects standard: peak lapel, no vent, with the exception of it having flapped pockets. This may, however, be due to its being only a # 2 or 3 grade suit and flapped pockets being cheaper to manufacture.

    Flapped pockets really are cheaper to manufacture? Why is that? Tuck it in, and you essentially have a jetted pocket, so how does a jetted pocket actually require more workmanship than a flap? [​IMG]
     
  9. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    For the sake of argument...

    [​IMG]

    The full shot was too dark to work with.

    BTW, my DB peacoat with huge lapels has non-flapped pockets, and I've never thought it looked odd.
     
  10. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    You can always have them removed.
     
  11. Quirk

    Quirk Senior member

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    For the sake of argument...

    [​IMG]

    The full shot was too dark to work with.

    BTW, my DB peacoat with huge lapels has non-flapped pockets, and I've never thought it looked odd.


    Nice. Send your resume to Reuters. [​IMG]
     
  12. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Nice. Send your resume to Reuters. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Israeli tuxedo with both flapped AND jetted pockets! Film at 11.
     
  13. summej2

    summej2 Senior member

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    Flapped pockets really are cheaper to manufacture? Why is that? Tuck it in, and you essentially have a jetted pocket, so how does a jetted pocket actually require more workmanship than a flap? [​IMG]


    Flapped pockets need not be besom pockets (i.e., with a welt around the opening) and thus require less time to make, whereas a jetted pocket is always (at least as far as I have seen) a besom pocket.
     
  14. Quirk

    Quirk Senior member

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    Flapped pockets need not be besom pockets (i.e., with a welt around the opening) and thus require less time to make, whereas a jetted pocket is always (at least as far as I have seen) a besom pocket.

    Ah, flap with no welt. *Yikes!* Anyway, thanks for the explanation.
     

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