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Legal Eagles

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I know @andy b. owns White's packers pointed toe, who else has bought packers?
@Legal Eagles ??
I don't see many pictures of Packers with pointed toe, it appears most of the folks wear BHs and SJs.
The 690 and 695 lasts simply do not work for my foot shape. To get wide enough in the ball, I either need to go way too long, or way to wide and my heel slips... alas, packers for me are not to be...
 

wordfool

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Make it stop! Just ordered another (my sixth) pair of White's and, I swear, this time it's my last. Fifth pair was ordered a week ago -- brown WF Bounty Hunters with vib100 sole for winter shit-kicker duty (hopefully they'll arrive fairly early next year in time for the worst winter weather). Sixth and final pair was more for fun and to fully even up my black vs brown White's balance -- brown bison SDs with commando half sole (and a request for the chunkiest-grained leather available). I opted for no toe cap to keep the price down a bit, but also to let the weirdness of the leather shine a bit more without other embellishments.

With so many pairs (White's and others) in rotation I can honestly say that I see no need for any more boots in my life for many more years. TBH I struggle to justify six pairs of Whites, but that's water under the proverbial bridge now!
 

chicagoan2016

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Make it stop! Just ordered another (my sixth) pair of White's and, I swear, this time it's my last. Fifth pair was ordered a week ago -- brown WF Bounty Hunters with vib100 sole for winter shit-kicker duty (hopefully they'll arrive fairly early next year in time for the worst winter weather). Sixth and final pair was more for fun and to fully even up my black vs brown White's balance -- brown bison SDs with commando half sole (and a request for the chunkiest-grained leather available). I opted for no toe cap to keep the price down a bit, but also to let the weirdness of the leather shine a bit more without other embellishments.

With so many pairs (White's and others) in rotation I can honestly say that I see no need for any more boots in my life for many more years. TBH I struggle to justify six pairs of Whites, but that's water under the proverbial bridge now!
Enjoyed your post!
Share a little detail about your White's boots, what kind of leather, color, sole type etc.
 

Netvine

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What do you suppose is the best way to deep clean and disinfect the inside of oil tan White’s? Is it the whispered baking soda method? I dont have an odor problem just very dirty.
 

Legal Eagles

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What do you suppose is the best way to deep clean and disinfect the inside of oil tan White’s? Is it the whispered baking soda method? I dont have an odor problem just very dirty.
If it is dirty, clean the inside with saddle soap, just like the outside... the baking soda "swish" is more for musty odors and dried perspiration... finish with a light coat of the conditioner of your choice... the inside is leather too, and needs care just like the outside!

Out of curiosity, why do you refer to the baking soda swish as "whispered"? Is it a secret? If so I will let the cat out of the bag...

"To clean the inside of your boots, mix a heaping tablespoon of baking soda into approximately 12 ounces of water. Slosh the mixture around inside the boot, making sure to wet all inside surfaces and then pour the mixture into the other boot and do the same, then dump it out, don’t let it set. Allow the boot to completely dry as the drying action will leach the acids, caused from sweat, out of your boots. This process should eliminate any musty smells that may have developed over time." - Nick's Boots

This is something I might do once per year... but always condition inside afterward as the baking soda can dry the leather.
 
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ExtraitdeMinimalist

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Make it stop! Just ordered another (my sixth) pair of White's and, I swear, this time it's my last. Fifth pair was ordered a week ago -- brown WF Bounty Hunters with vib100 sole for winter shit-kicker duty (hopefully they'll arrive fairly early next year in time for the worst winter weather). Sixth and final pair was more for fun and to fully even up my black vs brown White's balance -- brown bison SDs with commando half sole (and a request for the chunkiest-grained leather available). I opted for no toe cap to keep the price down a bit, but also to let the weirdness of the leather shine a bit more without other embellishments.

With so many pairs (White's and others) in rotation I can honestly say that I see no need for any more boots in my life for many more years. TBH I struggle to justify six pairs of Whites, but that's water under the proverbial bridge now!
I’m at 5 White’s since early summer. Granted, two of those were pre loved and heavily discounted. It has to stop here for me. Five month ago, having just one pair was a dream.
 

Jimk4003

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If it is dirty, clean the inside with saddle soap, just like the outside... the baking soda "swish" is more for musty odors and dried perspiration... finish with a light coat of the conditioner of your choice... the inside is leather too, and needs care just like the outside!

Out of curiosity, do you refer to the baking soda swish as "whispered"? Is it a secret? If so I will let the cat out of the bag...

"To clean the inside of your boots, mix a heaping tablespoon of baking soda into approximately 12 ounces of water. Slosh the mixture around inside the boot, making sure to wet all inside surfaces and then pour the mixture into the other boot and do the same, then dump it out, don’t let it set. Allow the boot to completely dry as the drying action will leach the acids, caused from sweat, out of your boots. This process should eliminate any musty smells that may have developed over time." - Nick's Boots

This is something I might do once per year... but always condition inside afterward as the baking soda can dry the leather.
I like to use distilled vinegar and water mixed in a little spray bottle to clean the insides. Just an occasional quick spritz seems to do a good job of keeping mildew at bay, and the 'Nick's method' of sloshing baking soda and water around inside the boot and then dumping it out always seemed like overkill on anything other than a really feral pair of boots. I might be tempted to try it if I bought a pair of heavily used boots that I wanted to annihilate any of the previous owner's bodily secretions from though.

I'm also not sure that baking soda is something you would want to be using too regularly on leather. Plus, you can get a gallon of distilled vinegar on Amazon for pennies, and it's handy for cleaning your grouting too.
 

Legal Eagles

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I like to use distilled vinegar and water mixed in a little spray bottle to clean the insides. Just an occasional quick spritz seems to do a good job of keeping mildew at bay, and the 'Nick's method' of sloshing baking soda and water around inside the boot and then dumping it out always seemed like overkill on anything other than a really feral pair of boots. I might be tempted to try it if I bought a pair of heavily used boots that I wanted to annihilate any of the previous owner's bodily secretions from though.

I'm also not sure that baking soda is something you would want to be using too regularly on leather. Plus, you can get a gallon of distilled vinegar on Amazon for pennies, and it's handy for cleaning your grouting too.
I don't suppose a dilute solution of vinegar would hurt, but vinegar is acidic just like perspiration... the purpose then of the baking soda solution - being basic - is to neutralize and remove any acidity from the leather as a result of dried perspiration. I am not sure acid on acid would work for that...

I am just going by what my cobbler tells me, backed up by Nick's who I figure should know...
 

Jimk4003

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I don't suppose a dilute solution of vinegar would hurt, but vinegar is acidic just like perspiration... the purpose then of the baking soda solution - being basic - is to neutralize and remove any acidity from the leather as a result of dried perspiration. I am not sure acid on acid would work for that...

I am just going by what my cobbler tells me, backed up by Nick's who I figure should know...
Good points, though the fact that leather is itself slightly acidic is one of the reasons I'm not too keen on regularly putting basic baking soda on it. I think keeping the leather around it's inherently slightly acidic levels won't lead to any long term harm.

Both vinegar and baking soda will likely kill any bacteria and fungus that cause odours, but vinegar is closer to the natural acidity of leather, which is why I personally prefer it.

It's all just hypothetical, and I've never heard of anyone destroying their boots with baking soda, but we all have our own particular ways.
 

Netvine

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Thank You! I was too shy to suggest maybe the biggest part of the swish was to restore a morw neutral ph. I am guilty of exposing this brown oil tan leather to bleach and other acids, manmade and chemicals over the past few years. I clean mostly with lexol cleaner inside, to remove mud etc. The question than do i clean with baking soda swish once in a blue moon to help balance ghe acidity of workboots? Or is it as you say just the most gentle and responsible way to clean the interior(these are unlined btw). The intent is to sanitize, clean and keep these going for decades if possible. Lots of mud, lots of mildew regularly.
 

Netvine

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I have put hdlp on the inside at the end of the vamp in the past, to help prevent mildew, but have felt guilty about this.
 

Legal Eagles

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Good points, though the fact that leather is itself slightly acidic is one of the reasons I'm not too keen on regularly putting basic baking soda on it. I think keeping the leather around it's inherently slightly acidic levels won't lead to any long term harm.

Both vinegar and baking soda will likely kill any bacteria and fungus that cause odours, but vinegar is closer to the natural acidity of leather, which is why I personally prefer it.

It's all just hypothetical, and I've never heard of anyone destroying their boots with baking soda, but we all have our own particular ways.
I think that the fact the baking soda solution is fairly dilute, and is only swished around the boot, not allowed to sit, prevents too much chance of damage to the leather. Leather starts acidic, and gets more acidic with perspiration... a quick swish with baking soda neutralizes the acidity from the sweat without much changing the pH or harming the leather. There is a reason Nicks does not recommend letting the solution sit or soak in...

And I am not talking about doing this every week, only once a year or so... plus if you condition afterward, you are "undoing" any minor pH change due to the baking soda.

Of course use at your own risk, but I have been doing this for years with no apparent harm to the leather...
 
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