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Crittendon - How does it fit

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by itsstillmatt, May 16, 2008.

  1. riverrun

    riverrun Senior member

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    Despite the discount price, I'd find myself hesitant to pay so much for a suit made in China.
    With all of the questions here on what to wear for an interview, a suit of this quality, in this price range seems to be in a certain sweet spot.
    Appreciate you being the guinea pig matt - thanks for the review and photos. It sounds like critt may well hit an 'objective' quality/retail price sweet spot. As the comments by Doc and others suggest, even in a generally quality-focused community, that is not identical to a sweet spot in the market. Generally, suits of a level where hand work is even an issue (usually 1500+ retail, often much more) are firmly luxury goods. On balance, I have a feeling Critt's lower retail price may be more of a commercial hamper than advantage in this market. My own totally subjective reaction to the cut is that the lapels and quarters look great, whereas the arms and armholes look like they could be better. But maybe I'm just comparing to what iammatt usually posts.
     
  2. nioh

    nioh Senior member

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    Overall, I think it looks to be cut a size too large or on the larger side. What I mean is, the sleeves seems to be too full and the armholes seem to start quite low. Also, the skirt seem to be flaring a bit too much in the unpinned version. Naturally RTW are made to fit a wide range of body types, but I'd rather see different models for different body types than an generic model to fit all.. Basically, I don't like it that much on you, but would probably consider, especially since you seem to be impressed with the construction and finish, it to be a better fitting coat on one with a bigger build.
     
  3. The Doctor

    The Doctor Senior member

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  4. grimslade

    grimslade Senior member

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    Matt, thanks a lot for doing this and taking the time to post it.

    I think it looks OK. But the sleeves look huge to me--full, or large diameter, not just a bit long. Larger than they need to be, and it leaves the wholel thing feeling just a trifle off. Not horribly so and not worse than most of the RTW stuff priced at or below this level. But not quite right either.
     
  5. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade. Fullness of the sleeves used to rank up there will roll of the lapel when men where taught how to distinguish the quality of a suit. There are good reasons to want fullness in the sleeve, so that will probably come back before too long.

    Unless these people are going for a chunk of the Polo market, and I don't think they are, then I doubt the armholes are a problem here--except for the individual buyer, who may want such things.
     
  6. horton

    horton Senior member

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    The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade. Fullness of the sleeves used to rank up there will roll of the lapel when men where taught how to distinguish the quality of a suit. There are good reasons to want fullness in the sleeve, so that will probably come back before too long.

    Unless these people are going for a chunk of the Polo market, and I don't think they are, then I doubt the armholes are a problem here--except for the individual buyer, who may want such things.


    I'm not sure I agree with this statement. A high armhole, perhaps counter-intuitively, allows for more arm movement. Thus, I don't see it as mere "fashion". For example if you were to raise your arm above your head the high-arm-hole-sleeve would be more likely to stay in place or closer relative to your wrist, whereas a lower-arm-hole-sleeve would ride up your arm. This is just to illustrate the point not to suggest that you buy a suit because of the way it looks while hailing a cab.

    I also think a high arm hole is a pretty good indicator about the manufacturer or tailor's dedication to fit; do they want a suit that fits a wider range of body types hoping for more sales, or are they willing to sacrifice that for the possibility that the suit will look that much better on a smaller population of consumers.

    For Matt's jacket I agree with many of the above comments that the sleeves seem too full and too low. It looks better pinned, and it seems surprising how little waist suppression there is unpinned.

    It may be a great value at present, but if I were to offer a suggestion to the makers it would be to trim things up a bit. The people/consumers who will appreciate whatever handwork and fabric will also appreciate a more tailored fit.
     
  7. Sator

    Sator Senior member

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    The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade.
    If so, why do my 90 - 120 year old frock coats and morning coats have high arm holes? Ditto for quality RTW from the 1950s. Ditto for my modern bespoke coats.
     
  8. neyus

    neyus Senior member

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    High armholes are a feature of most suits made in the first half of the last century. It allows greater movement and from an aesthetic perspective it permits a longer line along the sides of the coat up to the armpits.
     
  9. Sator

    Sator Senior member

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    from an aesthetic perspective it permits a longer line along the sides of the coat up to the armpits.

    This definitely helps to make you look taller.
     
  10. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    OK, ok, not the high armhole then, for all I know; but for sure there have been times when full sleeves were regarded as luxurious, stylish, fashionable, etc., and a hallmark of any luxury suit. We can have another thread on the history of arms and sleeves some other day.

    All I want to do is suggest that there's nothing wrong with the sleeves on this fine evening suit that Matt is modeling.
     
  11. texas_jack

    texas_jack Senior member

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    OK, ok, not the high armhole then, for all I know; but for sure there have been times when full sleeves were regarded as luxurious, stylish, fashionable, etc., and a hallmark of any luxury suit. We can have another thread on the history of arms and sleeves some other day.

    All I want to do is suggest that there's nothing wrong with the sleeves on this fine evening suit that Matt is modeling.


    I have a Alexandre bespoke suit from the early 1960s and while the arm hole is small the sleeve is quite full and then it tapers to the cuff. It drapes really nice when I bend my arm.
     
  12. Sator

    Sator Senior member

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    OK, ok, not the high armhole then, for all I know; but for sure there have been times when full sleeves were regarded as luxurious, stylish, fashionable, etc., and a hallmark of any luxury suit.
    I'm sure you are right but that was a hell of a long time ago: [​IMG] Many 18th century silk habites were also much more loosely cut. Ever since Beau Brummell, the ideal in menswear has been one of perfect fit. Through most of the 19th century they took this to even greater extremes than we do today: [​IMG]
     
  13. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    Those pictures are hilarious, Sator, but I'm not thinking of such radical examples. The full sleeve has been admired more recently - mid C20 - 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, and in conservative RTW manufactuers into the 80s and 90s. Early in that period, American consumers were suspicious of RTW jackets that were too short or too trim; the perception was that manufacturers were skimping on the cloth to make a good profit for the price. Salesmen had complicated arguments about how a fuller sleeve gave you greater freedom of movement, comfort when you raised your arms, etc., much as we have the same for the high armhole. And consumers were concerned that close-fitting suits would shrink too much if they were soaked in the rain. "Slim fit" was not a plus in RTW until maybe the 70s, and that was pretty short-lived at that point, I think. Certainly the average luxury RTW suit of the 1980s is not characterized by a tight fit down the arm.

    The armhole height and construction may or may not be related; I don't know enough to say. We like to see shirring at the top of the sleevehead, yes? Is that not a sign of greater fullness in the sleeve? Regardless, I think sleeve fullness was not often regarded as a sign of inferior quality in RTW until more recently.
     
  14. Brad

    Brad Senior member

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    Thanks for posting pics, Matt. The lower sleeve seems a but wide, but the upper sleeve looks pretty standard to me for RTW. That's an easy fix, though. Other than that, I think it has a nice silhouette. I would definitely buy at that price-point.
     
  15. haganah

    haganah Senior member

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    I'm sure the quality is great. The shoulders look nice. I have the same problem with this as I do with Oxxfords though...they're made for more rotund men.
     
  16. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Senior member

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    The pinned version goods quite good, not bad for the unpinned one. The fit issues mentioned by others are quite easy to fix.
     
  17. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member

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    Very nice. I'm not sure that the 3-button style with patch pockets mates well with the rope stripe, but it would work well with a linen, or maybe flannel suit. And many lightweight sport jacketings.

    IIRC, the body is a bit longer than on Matt's Rubinaccis, but none the worse for that. If the sleeves are adequately full and the armholes sufficiently tight, this could be a great find. And no, I don't care at all that it was not made by Italians.
     
  18. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

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    Thread doesn't know where it is sewn
    That is profound, I've been shaken to my core. [​IMG]
     
  19. Ambrosi

    Ambrosi Senior member

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    I took two pictures of the fit of the Crittendon jacket (actually part of a suit) I reviewed earlier. For the first picture, I pinned the back a bit to give it the after tailoring effect, and for the second I shot it as is. Obviously, the sleeves are too long, and the coat is slightly too long for my taste as well. The shoulders have quite a nice shape, and the overall look of the jacket is very, very nice. I am interested to hear your comments, as I am seriously surprised and impressed.

    Pinned to look like it would as worn:
    [​IMG]
    Unpinned:
    [​IMG]




    the tie that wearing in this picture is really beautiful ...[​IMG]
     

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