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Crease "bloom" w/Saphir

Cary Grant

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Gang,

I recently started using Saphir wax on my shoes.

Unlike when using Kiwi, I now get that pale white "bloom" on the creases of my shoes upon first wearing. ( I also condition with Lexol, FYI).

I use a very thin coating and brush off.

??? Advice?
 

Eccentric

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A little saphir seems to go a long way, so if you are using the ammount that you were with kiwi, it could be too much, hence the excess, but I really don't know.
 

DandySF

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I had a similar experience when using a neutral color wax. What color are you using? When I switched to a tan wax the problem went away. Of course I first had to strip off the neutral wax before applying the tan wax.
 

kaxixi

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+1. I use less Saphir per application than did Kiwi.
 

Cary Grant

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Thanks for the replies, I'm blending two very light tan colors.

I'll keep an eye on the amount I use. I'd say I was using less just given the Safir is "harder" but I'll try a very light application next time.
 

Dmax

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In my experience, once Saphir wax hardens, it will crack on any area of the shoe subject to creasing. I would recommend using it mostly on the toe and quarter areas, which tend to stay fairly rigid and use Saphir cream elsewhere. I think Kiwi may never harden to the same degree, being some sort of wax-cream hybrid, which means it does not crack in areas subject to creasing as much, though the crease prone areas will never maintain a good shine using any wax.
 

vitaminc

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had the same experience. it cracks so often/fast around creases now i only put it on the toe caps and heels (black shoes btw). don't think saphir work as well as, say, kiwi, for mirror shines.
 

Cary Grant

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Huzzah! Success!

Thank you everybody for your feedback. I no longer have any issues with "bloom" and the shoes look great.

I actually started following the 3-step process Ron recommended: 1) Lexol, 2) cream (used Meltonian), 3) Saphir.

And to make certain I used as little is possible, I held the cloth about a foot from an open tin just to let it "get a good look at it" then polished.


I gave the boots a thorough brushing after stages one and two and some brief rubbig with a chamois. Voila!
 

Chips

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I keep a small piece of silk cloth on me at all times when I'm wearing my dress shoes ( basically all the time) to use when I get a chance, to bend down and buff away any bloom, and to take care of any scuff marks. Once more briefly when I get home, and my shoes go for several weeks before needing a complete polishing.

I used to do it after every wear. So, now I'm saving time, and the shoes look great all the time, especially my cordovans.
 

vitaminc

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Originally Posted by Cary Grant
Huzzah! Success!

Thank you everybody for your feedback. I no longer have any issues with "bloom" and the shoes look great.

I actually started following the 3-step process Ron recommended: 1) Lexol, 2) cream (used Meltonian), 3) Saphir.

And to make certain I used as little is possible, I held the cloth about a foot from an open tin just to let it "get a good look at it" then polished.


I gave the boots a thorough brushing after stages one and two and some brief rubbig with a chamois. Voila!


are you able to get a mirror shine off saphir with that process?
 

SirSuturesALot

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Originally Posted by Cary Grant
Huzzah! Success!

Thank you everybody for your feedback. I no longer have any issues with "bloom" and the shoes look great.

I actually started following the 3-step process Ron recommended: 1) Lexol, 2) cream (used Meltonian), 3) Saphir.

And to make certain I used as little is possible, I held the cloth about a foot from an open tin just to let it "get a good look at it" then polished.


I gave the boots a thorough brushing after stages one and two and some brief rubbig with a chamois. Voila!


Any chance you might be able to share the 3-step process Ron recommended?
 

Golf_Nerd

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Originally Posted by vitaminc
are you able to get a mirror shine off saphir with that process?

pictures?
 

Cary Grant

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Originally Posted by vitaminc
are you able to get a mirror shine off saphir with that process?

I'm not trying for a mirror shine with these wingtip boots but I'll say the shine was pretty good as is. I'd bet on a nice wholecut with some layers and spitshine you'd do quite well. As Ron says below.

Ron's process is here. Specifically post #15.

Herer it is clipped from the larger post.

The Process

Your shoes should be polished and/or conditioned at least a couple times a month…each week, ideally. Even if you don’t do this yourself, drop a pair off at your local shoe repair shop or stop by a shine stand as often as possible. You can even purchase a set-up and give it to your favorite cobbler/bootblack and ask that they use these products to care for your shoes.

If you choose to polish/clean/condition your shoes yourself, start by applying a liberal amount of one of the conditioner/cleaners mentioned above. Allow a few minutes and promptly rub briskly with a cotton or felt rag. The shoe bags that often come in the box with ‘better’ shoes are ideal for this…simply cut into large strips for your polishing use.

Next, apply the appropriate shoe cream to areas that are showing the most wear. It is not necessary for the colors to match exactly (except for black, obviously), but to either blend in, or to highlight at your choosing. For example, a ‘cognac’ colored shoe might see ‘tan’, ‘mahogany’, ‘light brown’ or ‘mid-brown’ polishes; or maybe all four. Experiment.

After the cream hazes over, apply another coat of cleaner/conditioner and let sit for a few minutes. Take a high quality horsehair brush (the best are from Frank-Brushes, in Germany) and brush along the sides and across the vamp (top to the tip).

Next, apply your choice of wax/paste polish and, again, allow to haze over. After 5 minutes or so, brush off as before.

Finally, re-apply one more coat off cleaner/conditioner, allow to dry for a minute or two, and brush again. You can stop now, or continue to a ‘spit-shine’ step, which really just involves taking and old necktie (or nylon hose), misting a little water onto your shoe, and rapidly buffing with the silk rag.

The heat from the quick motion combined with a little water will ‘build’ another protective layer onto your shoe. A final step, though one I do not really recommend for most, is to use a ‘edge dye’ (we simply use leather dye from Fiebings) to dye the sole/welt edge and trim. This is tricky, and it is easy to ruin an upper if you do not do this carefully with the included dauber, so I would leave this to the cobbler, but the leather dye is readily available from Fiebings.
 

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