Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by gdl203, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    Yeah Varrena Poliform and Bulthaup are also very good.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012
  2. zissou

    zissou Senior member

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    Thanks for the advice. It is definitely solid maple. I've done a lot of stripping/sanding for repainting, but my problem is that I have no indoor/garage space to do the job. I'll check around town to see if there is a shop. Waterlox looks like a great product.
     
  3. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Perfect, that makes life easier. I've had a lot of success with waterlox, it's a great product.
     
  4. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Will have to try waterlox the next time I have a project that calls for an untinted finish.

    Today I started work on a project to make some IKEA unfinished pine shelving into something more attractive. The upright pieces got sanded down to 220 and then I put on the first coat of Watco Danish Oil in the black walnut color.

    Went with the method that was suggested to me which entailed keeping them wet with the oil for a while and then wet sanding with more oil and 400grit paper, letting dry/soak for a little bit, and then wiping off any excess. The wet sanding creates a slurry of oil and wood that is supposed to fill in the grain/small imperfections (of which the ikea wood has many).

    As expected with pine, the color's not as even or as deep as it could be but otherwise after just one coat, I am really liking the result. Looks way better than the previous unfinished pine furniture that I have just sanded and hit with some poly. Needs to dry and then get two more coats (last coat gets 600grit) and then we'll see how it looks. May be fine for bookshelf use at that point or might need some wax or even a poly coat.

    Then I just have to do the shelves with the light oak danish oil (which will be faster since they are just flat pieces).
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
  5. zissou

    zissou Senior member

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    ^Interesting technique, otc. I used to strip and wet sand old growth fir trim from my old Victorian house, and it sure did make for a smooth finish. Once I painted it with high gloss oil paint, it shone like a mirror.

    I actually decided to tackle the McCobb table refinishing job myself. I had the time this past week, so I figured why not. So far, I have stripped the old lacquer and sanded everything down with 120 grit. I'll come back through with 220 grit before oiling. There were a lot of nicks in the table, and I've managed to sand them all out. Man, my shoulders have been tired!

    I could not find Waterlox anywhere, so I am planning on using clear Deftoil Danish Oil Finish. It's a mix of Tung Oil and urethane, so it's a little more durable than just oil. Are there any other suggestions for prepping that you guys suggest prior to oiling? wiping with mineral spirits or just a tack cloth? Buffing the wood with leather?
     
  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    From a quick google, it sounds like the Deft product is pretty similar to the Watco version. If that is the case, I don't know how good of a surface it will leave for a tabletop. If you are kind to your table it will be ok, but it sounds like the waterlox provides a much more impervious surface. Maybe follow up with a coat of something else just on the tabletop?

    My method with the danish oil was pretty similar to what this woman is doing:
    http://wooditis.blogspot.com/2008/05/watco-danish-oil-come-oil-and-laugh.html
    combined with several other sets of written instructions detailing the wetsanding method. Basically I just went with what felt right to me for the size of piece I was working with.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
  7. zissou

    zissou Senior member

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    If I'm not mistaken, the Watco oil is just straight oil- no urethane, correct? The Deftoil will be a little more durable. Still, I was thinking of waxing it or even coming over the top with a couple coats of Deft's clear wood finish in matte or semi-gloss. I sanded out so many little nicks and dings that I don't want to have to do that again anytime soon.
     
  8. CalTex

    CalTex Senior member

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  9. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Zissou, I've tried many oils and find waterlox to be the only one that really holds up well.

    I prep tables with a 6" random orbit down to 220, if by hand I would take it to 320, then buff it out with 0000 steel wool prior to oiling. I clear the grain prior to oiling and also usually buff with a cotton cloth.

    CT. That setup is pretty sweet.
     
  10. CalTex

    CalTex Senior member

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    Do you think it would look weird in my living room?

    I will be living in a small condo in a year or two and I don't plan on buying new furniture.
     
  11. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I've never seen your living room, post a pic.

    There is a lot of mid-century and modern housing in Cali so I imagine it could look great in the right house. I've sat in them, they're very nice, and it's not out of place in a living room.

    It was originally designed as an indoor/outdoor lounge seat for the J Irwin Miller house, which is about as mid-century as it gets.

    It's go well with pretty much anything Saarinen, Mid-Century Danish or Eames without looking the least bit out of place.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  12. otc

    otc Senior member

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    After one coat, I am liking the result of this finish a lot. Makes me wish I had used this on my bed (which was also unfinished pine, albeit slightly higher quality stock) instead of just sanding it and using wipe-on poly.
     
  13. zissou

    zissou Senior member

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    OK then. Woodcraft in the big city stocks Waterlox, so I will go get some this week. By 'clearing the grain' do you mean blowing the pieces with compressed air?

    CalTex- Herman Miller is 15% off at sit4less.com today.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Sometimes i just use a tack cloth.

    15% of at DWR also, and I can hook you up on HM.
     
  15. zissou

    zissou Senior member

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    ^I'm glad I listened to your advice on using Waterlox. What a nice product! I have four thin coats on so far, and I'll probably to a light sanding to knock down any raised grain or dust (not much) before the final one or two coats. Thankfully, we have had a stretch of warmer weather, so I can apply it outside, and let it cure in my shed with a heater going. I was able to get about 90% of the blemishes out, and it's looking beautiful at this point!

    How long do you usually let it cure before using the piece of furniture? I'm not in a huge rush to use it, so I will try to give it a couple weeks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012

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