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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata

lordsuperb

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That Murphy bed has a fake medieval aesthetic that is incorrigible and I would not make any attempt to “complement” it with anything.

I would stick to very minimalist furnishings when working with a small room. I like your wall colour though and would assume you have no intention of repainting it.

I think people suggesting you add extra clutter with a credenza/corridor table next to your dining table are mad. A very simple round or square mirror would be fine there:


Floor length makes no sense as the table will be blocking the lower half.

Sure, get artwork instead if you want but I never buy a piece of art just to fill a space.

Yeah, no intentions of repainting the walls or adding more clutter to the space. The only clutter that I will add to the space is a side table and smaller lamp to go alongside the new couch. I know the pattern on the murphy bed isn't for everyone but it was my own design and I'm happy with how it turned out. I'll stay away from the full length and go with a wider portrait mirror or multiple mirrors that are smaller in size.

3x

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Longer Portrait
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gdl203

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I feel that the only place you could put a full length mirror is in place of the triple-stacked (bookcase?) piece you have between the two windows. We have one of those and it's pretty solid stuff but I don't think it would fit on your interior aesthetic right now.
 

Van Veen

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I wouldn’t call adding furniture that makes sense in the space “clutter.” In fact I would say the space is currently under-furnished.
 

gdl203

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I’ve had a least one lease that required x% of the floor space to be covered by rugs, I assume to minimize noise from walking.
That's actually pretty boilerplate language in NYC, both for lease riders in older buildings, and in co-op rules. I can't remember any NYC apartment I've lived in that had hardwood floors and did not have the requirement to cover xx% of floor surface with rugs or carpet.
 

lordsuperb

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I feel that the only place you could put a full length mirror is in place of the triple-stacked (bookcase?) piece you have between the two windows. We have one of those and it's pretty solid stuff but I don't think it would fit on your interior aesthetic right now.
I get what everyone is saying about the full length mirror. That furniture piece is pretty nifty as it holds my liquor and wine bottles. Do you think it takes up to much space?

I wouldn’t call adding furniture that makes sense in the space “clutter.” In fact I would say the space is currently under-furnished.
I would like to add another chair to the space where the murphy bed is located, but I haven't found a foldable chair that suits my aesthetic.
 

brianoh

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Does anyone have any tips on how to hire carpenters/cabentry for commissioned projects? I'm looking for a kitchen island in some neat wood with waterfall joints with open cabinets. I've sent some requirements to ppl on etsy local to me (Brooklyn) and what they've asked for is ludicrous IMO. Greatly appreciated!
 

lordsuperb

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Does anyone have any tips on how to hire carpenters/cabentry for commissioned projects? I'm looking for a kitchen island in some neat wood with waterfall joints with open cabinets. I've sent some requirements to ppl on etsy local to me (Brooklyn) and what they've asked for is ludicrous IMO. Greatly appreciated!
Greenleaf Nibert services the New York area.

 

lordsuperb

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I wouldn’t call adding furniture that makes sense in the space “clutter.” In fact I would say the space is currently under-furnished.
Folding chair?
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Sling Chair

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Van Veen

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I get what everyone is saying about the full length mirror. That furniture piece is pretty nifty as it holds my liquor and wine bottles. Do you think it takes up to much space?
I'll be diplomatic and say "it's not my style."
 

Kaplan

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Of the three chairs you've posted:

The first one looks like it belongs outside.

The Butterfly Chair is nice, but you can find a better version without the scar looking stitching (like this one).

The Cuba MG501 I especially like (I'm still awaiting delivery of one ordered some time ago).
 

Van Veen

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I am patting myself on the back a bit by posting this, but I can't resist. I just stumbled on this article that makes the exact same points I did last week, and is written by architects, not just a design fan like me.

"There is a subset of iconic furniture pieces that were originally designed not to be special or exclusive, but on the contrary, they were designed to be fabricated from a conventional kit of parts and assembled with straight-forward methods. These pieces were designed precisely to be practical to society at large and affordable for the lay-person. Decades after their creation, and for reasons that are rarely discussed, these furniture pieces are now sold at prices disproportionate to their original intent. Maybe these designs met a secret aesthetic code that warranted a higher price tag. Maybe the companies that own the rights to these original designs have limited the production precisely to create more demand and higher expense. Or maybe the production, marketing and retailing of these pieces has strayed from the intended path. While it’s difficult to determine the reasons, one thing is clear to us about this subset of designs: The finished products of these “authentic” furniture pieces don’t meet the design code of the originals; they have become expensive and exclusive. In this case, it can actually be the more cost-effective and more rapidly produced replicas that meet the original design intent. It’s often the copies that are manufactured efficiently on an assembly line and sold to the masses at sensible prices."

"When design is created precisely to be distinctive or limited, we’re advocates of the more expensive originals, or at the very least, opponents of cheap replicas. But there is an important distinction to identify with designed objects when the original intent of the design is undermined by current day methods, marketing, or costs. Taking something that can be easily fabricated with simple materials and common methods and making it exclusive, elite, and expensive gets a thumbs down from Team BUILD. We’ve covered furniture in this post only to illustrate a point, but this distinction applies to design of all sorts. There are times when the knock-off can actually be more genuine than the original."
 

Loathing

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The author makes the same screaming logical mistake that you did. The original intent of some MCM furniture was indeed to be affordable, but it was also intended to be high quality. You have to satisfy both criteria. Buying a low quality replica doesn’t fulfil the original intent any more than buying a ruinously expensive version that painstakingly matches the original quality.

The point is that you can no longer get that quality at an affordable price becuase the world has changed dramatically since then.
 

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