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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by gdl203, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. steveoffice

    steveoffice Distinguished Member

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    bought some ch24 chairs over the weekend.

    i briefly considered the cushions, which looks pretty ridiculous and pretty pricey (600 for set of 4).
     

  2. TheFoo

    TheFoo THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Cushions ruin the chair.

    The paper cord is actually pretty easy to keep clean. It is wax coated so will repel some minor staining. Just make sure you have soap flakes around so you can emergency clean.

    In worst case, you can always have the paper cord redone. Not expensive to do so.
     

  3. TheFoo

    TheFoo THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Will checkout Weigelt.

    Saying I like Wegner is like saying one likes the Beatles, but I think it's worth noting that the PP Mobler-produced designs of his are next level. You are probably are aware, but since they were his long-standing prototype maker, they inherited almost the entirety of his high-end portfolio. Wegner designs produced by other Danish makers tend to be for his lower-end, more mass-produced pieces (such as the Wishbone chair).

    Horses for courses. "Exotic" and "more flair" are very much the opposite of what most of the Danish designers were going for. I don't like my furniture to be so precious or attention-getting, I suppose. The nice thing about soaped oak is that it ages very gracefully and is easy to maintain.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019

  4. Bromley

    Bromley Senior Member

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    Desiderata! "Gigogne" Coffee pot, creamer, and sugar by Christian Fjerdingstad (1926).
    IMG_5666.JPG
     

  5. Medwed

    Medwed Distinguished Member

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    Yea, but you are not in big leagues until you start ordering your furniture bespoke. Knoll reupholstering saga does not count.

    :nest:
     

  6. TheFoo

    TheFoo THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Not sure I care what league I’m in, but most bespoke furniture is ugly as f*ck. Good craftsmanship and good design are two separate things.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2019

  7. Medwed

    Medwed Distinguished Member

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    You are telling me you never had an itch to custom order piece of furniture simply because there was nothing on the market that would fit your requirements? If it turns out ugly , well we have no one to blame but.
     

  8. Bromley

    Bromley Senior Member

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    Really? That's like saying most custom clothing is ugly and then avoiding bespoke tailoring altogether. That's a perspective I could understand, but from what I've seen you write, I don't think that's been your approach or style.

    There are a lot of furniture makers out there focusing on superior craftsmanship and design. The companies you've mentioned do really nice work with great design, but their stuff has a kind of factory-made look and feel. It doesn't have a heartbeat. Like a fused canvas vs. a hand padded one. This kind of stuff is mostly nuance that probably goes unnoticed by the majority of people considering furniture, but you seem like someone who would care about that kind of thing.
     

  9. Gus

    Gus Stylish Dinosaur Dubiously Honored

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    Talking with my wife about our next home and how we will mix Corbusier, Navajo, Mission Oak and a pair of comfortable reading chairs. We seem to be coming back to the fact that we love all kinds of modern, period, antiques, etc., but for real comfort you kinda want a cozy recliner chair. Is there any such thing besides a Lazy Boy????
     

  10. Medwed

    Medwed Distinguished Member

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    Knoll on vintage market has various cozy chairs. Antique market has English Wing-chairs, but you lucky if they don't need reupholstering.

    P.S. I would never have anything by LeCarbusier in my home for several reasons: Too many copies, too cliche, too uncomfortable and the main thing is I HATE Lecarbusier! He is an amateur architect who by virtue of being media whore had outsize influence on architecture of mid 20th C. He is Andy Warhol of architecture. The horrid ugliness of 1950-60-70 apartment buildings around Europe is his influence. He once proposed a serious plan of leveling all Haussmannian buildings along Champs Elysees and replacing them with his usual atrocities for the working class.
    Even Swiss realized what a POS he was and kicked him off their 10 Frank banknote to be replaced with a picture of a dark tunnel, symbolic indeed.
     

  11. steveoffice

    steveoffice Distinguished Member

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    i like his counsin's stuff
     

  12. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Distinguished Member

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    That "horrid ugliness" freed many people from the slums of C19th factory towns and tenements. If you had any real knowledge of the social history of twentieth century architecture and town planning, you'd know this, and you'd also know that the reason for the failure of many of these large-scale schemes was nothing to do with Le Corbusier, it was a combination of: overly rapid building (because of the devastation of war); a failure to invest enough in design and materials - basically, local and national governments in many cases, cut corners; disregarding or playing down vital elements of modernist principles most particularly the need for business space, shops and services for residents so that these blocks were just stacks of appartments; disregarding maintenance and the costs of operating and maintaining such buildings.

    However there are really good examples of how modernist architecture works for mass housing, when enough time, care and investment is put into design, materials and maintenance. In London, for example the fabulous Barbican estate:
    [​IMG]

    or the Dunboyne Road Estate:
    [​IMG]

    and Lulot Gardens:
    [​IMG]

    Both of the latter are in Camden, which was one local authority in Britain that paid particular attention to the design and care of its estates.
     

  13. Bromley

    Bromley Senior Member

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    Can't speak to their comfort, but some of the Stickley recliners out there may fit your criteria.
     

  14. Medwed

    Medwed Distinguished Member

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    Thank you for your all or nothing argument supported by 3 pictures. The thing is, occasional decent mid century building development is antithesis to LeCrbusier principals of communal living and architecture. Ugly monotonous blocks of flats with tiny windows, low ceilings and bare concrete walls is what has been built by the millions in his name. It was "Modern" and thus had to replace the old. In some cases beautiful 19C historic centers were destroyed and replaced with new 'PURPOSEFUL' architecture for masses popularized by LeCarbuisier and other protestant anal-retentive loudmouths.
    Most of the destruction took place after WWII. Budgets were small and instead of giving old building to tenants in exchange for maintenance and renovation money were siphoned into building companies that in turn eagerly erected millions of ugly monotonous blocks of flats while pocketing the profits. Actually it is not over this principal live and well in Eastern Europe. EU funds are diverted into new construction instead of preservation and renovation of historic centers. So you are correct it is not only LeCarbuisier it is him and stealing.
    Factory buildings and tenements? I think you are talking about architecture of England and applying it to the whole Europe. If I was from UK I don't know how I would feel about 1950s ugly tenements that replaced utter ugliness of those proletariat rowhouses that UK is famous for. Ugliness replaced with different ugliness, who cares?
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019

  15. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Distinguished Member

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    Actually there are similar experiences in many parts of the world, not least North America. This isn't about some weird nationalism, I was just examples of which I have personal experience. And in fact in Scandanavia, where I also have some experience, modern social housing has been far more successful than in the UK, for example. Again, in Japan, where I have experience, probably less (although it depends on the area).

    The point is that people who moved into these new modern apartments did not think they were ugly - you can watch films about not the top examples I posted above, but the ordinary estates that are now regarded as eyesores and you will see the amazement and joy of ordinary people in their new homes. They were clean, spacious, generously proportioned, with access to facilities and services that people previously did not have. I don't think that many people can conceived of the levels of poverty that ordinary people lived with in the pre-WW2 period, even up to the 1960s.

    So who cares? Actually, lots of people. And frankly, I care much less about what overprivileged people like you think about these people and places. To me the most offensive ugliness is the ugliness of poverty, unemployment, poor nutrition. No-one who knows anything about the social history involved would say that nothing changed and everything is the same. It's not. But it should have been, could have been, much much better. And that's not about superficial aesthetic judgements, it's about the other things I mentioned: design, care, maintenance etc. There's nothing fundamentally wrong with modernist architecture thinking at all that love, commitment and funding wouldn't put right.
     

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