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gomestar

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I realize I'm totally lame for asking guests not to rest their wine on the couch, or on the side chairs, or on the rocking chair.
 

otc

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You don't have to wait until you are 30 to teach your friends the manners that their parents forgot to teach them.

Buy a good bed and mattress. Mattress that is comfortable, some sort of platform bed that can hold up to years of..."abuse".

Nothing wrong with IKEA if you are careful about what you pick. Since your new place isn't that large, you have to realize that some of the items you buy simply might not work at your next place.

Some of the IKEA sofas are actually pretty good...and that is something where the size could change depending on your next place. An 80" Karlstad might be as big as you can go now...the Isunda Gray fabric is pretty nice (as are the Korndal fabrics IIRC), and if you change the legs out to something not-ugly, you have a pretty solid piece for a little over $500.

Do you have much room for a dining table? That's another thing that would grow rapidly as you gain more space. The PS 2012 table is pretty sturdy and nice...with the drop-leafs out, you can still fit a bunch of friends around it for dinner or board games.

You'll find that you can spend a lot more money at somewhere like Crate & Barrel or West Elm...without really getting anything nicer.
And as long as you don't go 100% IKEA, and stay away from the ubiquitous junky pieces (I'm looking at you LACK tables), you aren't going to look like one of their showrooms.
Stick to the pieces that use solid wood or make smart use of MDF+veneer (it has its place)...the things that use torsion boxes just don't last forever, and their finishes don't hold up well.
Don't let people sit on your coffee table.
 

gomestar

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Nothing wrong with IKEA if you are careful about what you pick. Since your new place isn't that large, you have to realize that some of the items you buy simply might not work at your next place.


yeah, start with Ikea pieces, then replace bit by bit as you get more $$. CB2 has solid stuff that's a tad more expensive.

the only meh thing about some Ikea pieces (not talking about quality of construction, which can be meh) is that, in my experience, a lot of Ikea storage pieces are meant to be built, and then stay built. Our somewhat flimsy 96" shelving units were going to remain as is, and there's no way we'd be able to get them out, so they'd need to be broken down ... and they aren't supposed to be broken and re-assembled, so in the trash they went.

Our CB2 glass and metal bookshelves, on the other hand, came right apart, moved easily, and then assembled to go right back up (they are my favorite sub-$300 shelves out there)
 
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otc

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the only meh thing about some Ikea pieces (not talking about quality of construction, which can be meh) is that, in my experience, a lot of Ikea storage pieces are meant to be built, and then stay built. Our somewhat flimsy 96" shelving units were going to remain as is, and there's no way we'd be able to get them out, so they'd need to be broken down ... and they aren't supposed to be broken and re-assembled, so in the trash they went.


I go one step further and use wood glue when assembling anyone's ikea furniture on any of the doweled joints (usually they don't call for glue). Also, go back to any IKEA piece after a month of use and give the bolts an extra tightening as they will have settled.

But that only works for pieces that you can move whole in the future. The ikea dresser I have had since college is still going strong...but I would expect it to disintegrate if I actually had to disassemble anything.


I'd heard (maybe here) that one should stay away from IKEA sofas. I have no experience with them.


I'm sure it depends on the sofa...but a bunch of my friends have had pretty solid luck with the Karlstad. The frame is constructed of a mix of plywood and hardwood (no MDF that I recall seeing), and the bottom cushions appear to hold their shape even after a few years of frequently cramming 4 people on to a 3-person couch. The back cushions get a little frumpy, but they are constructed with fiberfill like pillows...if you don't want to fluff them occasionally, replacing with foam inserts or tufting them will keep them in shape.

In fact...I just bought one myself. I despise my current couch but don't really know what I want to replace it with. So I picked up a Karlstad that appears to be in good physical shape with a faded cover for like $60. There are a few companies that make replacement upholstery for ikea furniture with better fabric...so as soon as the swatches come in, I will be getting rid of my hated sofa.
 

Dapp

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Thanks for all the good information guys, really appreciate it.

@archetypal_yuppie : I'm moving to downtown Seattle.

I think I'm going to spend the most on the bed / mattress since I'll take that with me when I move again to a new apartment / city. I've seen some decent looking ones on CB2 and Room & Board, but I don't know if there's better quality for similarish price range.

@otc : Thanks for the Karlstad recommendation. I'll check that out. I've had an IKEA bed for the last 4 years of school and never had an issue with it. But there's no point in shipping a $300 bed across country. I won't have room for a dining table in my current layout which, if nothing else, saves money. But I'll keep your suggestion in mind whenever I upsize down the line.
 

LeatherBoot

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There are simple solid hardwood beds made in the USA mattress stores sell for $500-$600. R&B and CB2 don't really sell any great looking beds and if you don't have a lot to spend you would be better off spending more money on a quality mattress and less on the bed itself.

The other option worth considering is a flexible slat base bed where the base does all of the work instead of the mattress. I have one from SwissFlex and it's the best bed I have ever had. They are compatible with any standard bed and can be used on their own. The ones without motors are relatively affordable.



If you are a side sleeper you get a lot of flexibility in the shoulder area.
 

Jr Mouse

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I used to Hate IKEA, but have come around. They have some decent beds and tables for the price. I actually did an IKEA hack for a nightstand in my bedroom that's worked well. Bought two LACK tables and glued the top of one to the bottom of the other to make a cube.

I'm considering one of their beds to replace mine when I move in April. Just for something to hold me over for a few years till I decide to invest in a much nicer one.
 

GreenFrog

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There are simple solid hardwood beds made in the USA mattress stores sell for $500-$600. R&B and CB2 don't really sell any great looking beds and if you don't have a lot to spend you would be better off spending more money on a quality mattress and less on the bed itself. The other option worth considering is a flexible slat base bed where the base does all of the work instead of the mattress. I have one from SwissFlex and it's the best bed I have ever had. They are compatible with any standard bed and can be used on their own. The ones without motors are relatively affordable. If you are a side sleeper you get a lot of flexibility in the shoulder area.
I'm a side sleeper. How does that slat work? I would think that any mattress thicker than 2"would take the brunt of the pressure, not the slats under that specific pressure point themselves.
 

LeatherBoot

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My apologies for this picture but it's the only one I could find from the company:



It's basically a suspension slat bas where the shoulder area in particular has a lot of flexibility. Their matresses too have special areas for the shoulder should that you don't put too much pressure on the shoulder.

I also have the 4 motor version that moves about not unlike a hospital bed:



Here is a 3D video were they drop some balls on it.

0.jpg
 
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Medwed

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Ikea pillow top mattress on the floor is the best sleep I've had recently. For those preferring raised bed put 2-3 inch low-density memory foam topper on the firmest inner spring and you will be sleeping well.
Unless someone makes a mattress that helps regulate your body temperature while you asleep I am not spending my money on new "sleeping tech" gimmicks.
 

Piobaire

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My new apartment is small (~650 ft^2) and I'm willing to use a significant portion of that money on big items (bed, couch, and maybe shelving/storage).


They make platform beds that have hinges at the head of the bed such that the mattress and platform open up to reveal storage space. Given how small your apartment is, and 12.5k to spend on furniture, I would consider one of those.
 

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