• We would like to welcome American Trench as an official Affiliate Vendor. American Trench is a Philadelphia based outerwear, apparel, and accessories brand, making all of its products in the United States at (mostly) family owned factories. . Please visit the American Trench thread and welcome them to the forum.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

brokencycle

Stylish Dinosaur
Moderator
Joined
Nov 21, 2008
Messages
23,818
Reaction score
22,454
spec sheet says 2700k , that's the very warm side of the spectrum but it sounds like it's not built-in so you could presumably tailor with another temperature
Its interesting how people perceive light differently. I would not consider 2700K "very warm." It is warm, but I don't put anything cooler than 3000K in my house because I find anything cooler to be unpleasant. A lot of the lighting I have in the house is actually warm on dim LEDs, so at full brightness they are either 2700K or 3000K, but they dim down to 2000-2200K.
 

ValidusLA

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2019
Messages
3,088
Reaction score
4,303
Anyone have a cocktail shaker that they love both for looks and for functionality?
 

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
14,898
Its interesting how people perceive light differently. I would not consider 2700K "very warm." It is warm, but I don't put anything cooler than 3000K in my house because I find anything cooler to be unpleasant. A lot of the lighting I have in the house is actually warm on dim LEDs, so at full brightness they are either 2700K or 3000K, but they dim down to 2000-2200K.
here's a detail from my bathroom , two light sources the one is 2700k led prob equivalent of ~40w , the mirror runs 6000k and dimmable it gets used for even fill ... candlelight gets rated at like 1800 iirc

IMGP6514.JPG

the design of that taccia lamp goes back to filament bulbs but updated for led i suppose .

Screen Shot 2022-05-19 at 9.40.41 AM.png

i might agree that most *warm* led lamps seem somewhat colder than filament , maybe that's why i seem to gravitate to warmer shades and metals to help glow up the effect
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
22,132
Reaction score
15,042
Its interesting how people perceive light differently. I would not consider 2700K "very warm." It is warm, but I don't put anything cooler than 3000K in my house because I find anything cooler to be unpleasant. A lot of the lighting I have in the house is actually warm on dim LEDs, so at full brightness they are either 2700K or 3000K, but they dim down to 2000-2200K.
Yeah, 2700K is "normal" for the most part. Just called "soft white" and what you normally expect to get if you don't specify. 5000k is called out as "Daylight".

You occasionally see specialty bulbs go lower like Edison-look bulbs that might go down to 2000-2200, or you get the weird 3000k bulbs.

That said, I also generally dislike daylight bulbs. You mostly don't use your lights when the sun is at peak brightness...you use them when the sun is setting (or gone) and the daylight will look out of place. I hate when I drive by a house that is just pouring out daylight at 10pm. You also generally don't want all the extra blue from a 5000k bulb when you are going to bed.

But really, most important is to not mix and match. Your eyes will adjust to anything in that range for the most part...but if you have some fixtures mismatched, you'll notice the weird colors.

Except for something like a bathroom or closet...you might want access to both color temps so you can see how colors would look during the day vs during the night/indoors.
 

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
14,898
Yeah, 2700K is "normal" for the most part. Just called "soft white" and what you normally expect to get if you don't specify. 5000k is called out as "Daylight".

You occasionally see specialty bulbs go lower like Edison-look bulbs that might go down to 2000-2200, or you get the weird 3000k bulbs.

That said, I also generally dislike daylight bulbs. You mostly don't use your lights when the sun is at peak brightness...you use them when the sun is setting (or gone) and the daylight will look out of place. I hate when I drive by a house that is just pouring out daylight at 10pm. You also generally don't want all the extra blue from a 5000k bulb when you are going to bed.

But really, most important is to not mix and match. Your eyes will adjust to anything in that range for the most part...but if you have some fixtures mismatched, you'll notice the weird colors.

Except for something like a bathroom or closet...you might want access to both color temps so you can see how colors would look during the day vs during the night/indoors.
worth making a distinction between the source and effect , for instance lighting a painting i'm probably not going to want 2700k regardless of the rest of the room lighting .
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
22,132
Reaction score
15,042
I dunno...this random article from Sothebys on the first page of google results says they prefer a high-CRI 2700k bulb:


For the home though, it should really just match the rest of the lighting since that's what your eyes are used to. You will see apparent color shift if you use a different temperature bulb on the painting than on everything else your eyes see in the room. Having a high CRI is much more important. You could make subtle changes in color temp if the art doesn't quite look right in your space (like if the artwork is a bit too red-brown to match your space, you could brighten it up by lighting it with a 3000k spot, but that's fundamentally an attempt to *change* the appearance)

I paid extra for some fancy high-CRI bulb for my dining-table pendant to get the best colors on my food.
 

cross22

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2009
Messages
5,778
Reaction score
3,338
If you are willing to install some dimmers just get warm dim light bulbs and have it both ways.
 

Gibonius

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
21,571
Reaction score
27,502
But really, most important is to not mix and match. Your eyes will adjust to anything in that range for the most part...but if you have some fixtures mismatched, you'll notice the weird colors.
My neighbors have one room that's Bright White and it sears my goddam eyes every time they have it lit up at night. But just the one room.
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
22,132
Reaction score
15,042
I've replaced most of the bulbs, but when we moved in there was a weird blend.

It was actually a TRIPLE combo because they had a bunch of these stupid Halogen-inside-a-normal-bulb bulbs (the ones that skirt the laws on incandescents since a 60w equivalent uses "only" 43w). Those were like 3000k. Luckily 3000 is close enough to 2700 that it isn't as noticable...

I still have daylight bulbs in the microwave lights above the range...I've just been too lazy to figure out what I need to buy to replace them, but I hate it whenever they are on. Also daylight in the walk-in closet (mostly laziness since we rarely turn it on, but also means you can compare clothing just by stepping in and out).

Oh, and daylight in the garage because that's what the big super bright garage bulbs came in.
 

ValidusLA

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2019
Messages
3,088
Reaction score
4,303
My nextdoor neighbor has two lights by the street on either side of his path that leads to his door.

Identical fixtures. One bulb bright white. One bulb warm.

Drives me insane. I've never said anything. It's been this way for years. Tempted to go change myself, but not sure if his Ring will pick me up.
 

Gibonius

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
21,571
Reaction score
27,502
I've replaced most of the bulbs, but when we moved in there was a weird blend.

It was actually a TRIPLE combo because they had a bunch of these stupid Halogen-inside-a-normal-bulb bulbs (the ones that skirt the laws on incandescents since a 60w equivalent uses "only" 43w). Those were like 3000k. Luckily 3000 is close enough to 2700 that it isn't as noticable...

I still have daylight bulbs in the microwave lights above the range...I've just been too lazy to figure out what I need to buy to replace them, but I hate it whenever they are on. Also daylight in the walk-in closet (mostly laziness since we rarely turn it on, but also means you can compare clothing just by stepping in and out).

Oh, and daylight in the garage because that's what the big super bright garage bulbs came in.
I needed an LED strip to go over my fireplace, and I got those ridiculously expensive programmable Hue ones just so that I could dial the white color temperature to the exact value I wanted.



Turns out it's also kind of fun to do ridiculous disco party colors sometimes. So that's a plus.


My nextdoor neighbor has two lights by the street on either side of his path that leads to his door.

Identical fixtures. One bulb bright white. One bulb warm.

Drives me insane. I've never said anything. It's been this way for years. Tempted to go change myself, but not sure if his Ring will pick me up.
I'd legit be going over there with a hammer and shattering the bright white. I can't stand that shit.

Put on a face mask first. Who would know?
 

ValidusLA

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2019
Messages
3,088
Reaction score
4,303
I needed an LED strip to go over my fireplace, and I got those ridiculously expensive programmable Hue ones just so that I could dial the white color temperature to the exact value I wanted.



Turns out it's also kind of fun to do ridiculous disco party colors sometimes. So that's a plus.




I'd legit be going over there with a hammer and shattering the bright white. I can't stand that shit.

Put on a face mask first. Who would know?
Tempting. I live on a cul de sac up a hill. Not a lot of randoms or vandalism.

I should borrow my bros truck, get some lumber and "accidentally" back into the light.
 

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
14,898
I dunno...this random article from Sothebys on the first page of google results says they prefer a high-CRI 2700k bulb:


For the home though, it should really just match the rest of the lighting since that's what your eyes are used to. You will see apparent color shift if you use a different temperature bulb on the painting than on everything else your eyes see in the room. Having a high CRI is much more important. You could make subtle changes in color temp if the art doesn't quite look right in your space (like if the artwork is a bit too red-brown to match your space, you could brighten it up by lighting it with a 3000k spot, but that's fundamentally an attempt to *change* the appearance)

I paid extra for some fancy high-CRI bulb for my dining-table pendant to get the best colors on my food.
super enjoying this convo .

considering that ideal studio easel light is natural daylight through north facing windows ( and prior to 20th century basically any studio art would have likely been made in diffuse high kelvin light ) i'd argue that it is the warmer temp lighting that is altering the work . i'd also agree about the cri - post some pics of deliciously colored food !

as for sothebys , it's a sales room . i'd rather look to conservationists and museums . museums incidentally have moved away from black-box concept rooms ( where art viewing is a controlled experience with no incidental influence ) to mix natural (high kelvin) light with typical leds for conservation purposes . mixed kelvins ! i'd bet most museums are running between 3000k and 4000k but i'd also imagine it's case-by-case and considers the work itself etc .

 
Last edited:

Desi

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2009
Messages
2,234
Reaction score
386
My neighbors have one room that's Bright White and it sears my goddam eyes every time they have it lit up at night. But just the one room.
it me. I'm running a daylight bright in my small kitchen. It's wild.
 

Mujib

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
561
Reaction score
62
super enjoying this convo .
Me too. Thanks to everyone for all the great info. Now I'm thinking I have a lot of bulbs to replace.

The lamp looks much brighter in double00's post than in some of the pics I've seen. Also, the glass isn't as transparent when the lamp is on. Much nicer.

I don't know about the silver option though. I think the black and bronze contrast better against the chrome.
 

Featured Sponsor

What's the biggest deciding factor for you when making a clothing purchase?

  • Style of an item

  • Price of an item

  • Material of an item

  • Brand


Results are only viewable after voting.

Forum statistics

Threads
476,902
Messages
10,185,138
Members
214,111
Latest member
wevecise
Top